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WiiDS

Dragon Quest Creator Praises Revolution

by Jonathan Metts - January 13, 2006, 12:15 pm PST
Total comments: 22 Source: Eurogamer

Yuji Horii comments on the controller's interactive potential.

At a London press event for the European release of Dragon Quest VIII on PS2, the creator of the RPG series mentioned his feelings about the Revolution controller. From Eurogamer:

I like the idea of interactivity with the hardware, so there, where you mention the Nintendo controller, it's a new interface, and it's exciting to have that reaction. You do something, and it reacts to you. It's human nature that to have some feedback from your actions it rewarding."

The Dragon Quest series is massively popular in Japan, but has not appeared on a Nintendo console since the Super Famicom days. It still makes occasional appearances on Nintendo's handhelds, including the recent release of Slime no Mori Mori 2 for the DS.

Visit Eurogamer at the link above for Horii's full quote and some additional information.

Talkback

KDR_11kJanuary 13, 2006

Doesn't surprise me. There IS a DQ spinoff that uses a sword controller you swing around, after all. He's probably thinking about making a proper (i.e. deep, long) game out of that.

Ian SaneJanuary 13, 2006

Always nice to hear encouraging words for a major developer. But we heard similar stuff about the Cube too and it usually didn't amount to anything. So feel good about the positive feedback but don't get your hopes up yet.

puduJanuary 13, 2006

Quote

Originally posted by: Ian Sane
Always nice to hear encouraging words for a major developer. But we heard similar stuff about the Cube too and it usually didn't amount to anything. So feel good about the positive feedback but don't get your hopes up yet.


Exactly what I was going to post.

Tuxedo.BondJanuary 13, 2006

That's right, more developers coming to their senses.

face-icon-small-smile.gif

ArtimusJanuary 13, 2006

The stuff about the Cube was less specific though. There was no advantage to being on the Cube, it was just a bit easier to develop. The thing people like about the Rev can't be got anywhere else.

DjunknownJanuary 13, 2006

Make the next DQ a Rev exclusive face-icon-small-tongue.gif Then there'll be something to be happy about.

Quote

Horii was in London to promote the European release of the eighth game in April, which has been renamed Dragon Quest: The Journey of the Cursed King for PAL territories, the number being dropped as this is the first Dragon Quest game to hit Europe.


WTF? You mean the European reigion hasn't officially had the Dragon Quest series up to this point? Wow, that's just....wow, I don't know...baffling?

MarioJanuary 13, 2006

Maybe there is some substance to that old "Dragon Quest EXPLODES on to Nintendo Revolution" rumor after all?

KDR_11kJanuary 13, 2006

You mean cheap DVD + highspeed drive?

couchmonkeyJanuary 14, 2006

People said more than just "the Cube is easy to develop for". Tons of developers were praising Nintendo for innovation and saying the GameCube was important to have because Nintendo was the one out of the three competitors that cared about the industry, etc. etc.

I agree that the Revolution is more of a true innovation than the GameCube ever was, and that will probably entice developers, but I have to agree with Ian on this one - it doesn't mean anything until they announce actual games.

ArtimusJanuary 14, 2006

Quote

Originally posted by: couchmonkey
People said more than just "the Cube is easy to develop for". Tons of developers were praising Nintendo for innovation and saying the GameCube was important to have because Nintendo was the one out of the three competitors that cared about the industry, etc. etc.

I agree that the Revolution is more of a true innovation than the GameCube ever was, and that will probably entice developers, but I have to agree with Ian on this one - it doesn't mean anything until they announce actual games.


No one called the GCN innovative! Good lord, what was innovative about it? None of the compliments pertained to the system's capabilities besides its development ease. GameCube focusing on games didn't affect which platform games were made for.

ruby_onixJanuary 14, 2006

The difference between the Cube and the Rev (in this regard) is that companies like Enix took a wait-and-see attitude, and the Cube didn't offer anything worth waiting for. The Rev is offering something that Enix clearly wants (sword control), and nobody else is even suggesting that they'll offer it.

If "Kenshin Dragon Quest" isn't a Revolution launch title (or at least well into high-priority development since before launch) then I'm going to be very surprised and disappointed. The only question is how much "substance" Enix is going to put into the game, and if it can compete with their typical RPG efforts.

If Enix puts their heart into Kenshin Dragon Quest, and it doesn't replace the regular Dragon Quest series, then the Revolution is going to be somewhat pointless. If it does replace the regular series, then Nintendo will be justified, and their victory (particularly in Japan) will be almost assured.

Michael8983January 14, 2006

The Cube being easy to develope for wasn't as much a strength as it should have been simply because it was released too late. If it was released at the same time as the PS2, we could have seen a major shift in developer support. The PS2 was a nightmare for developers and the GCN was a breeze. Developers would have obviously preferred the GCN and with both consoles starting on equal legs they could have convinced the publishers to go along with them. Problem is by the time the GCN was released the PS2 already had a massive lead and developers were finally getting the hang of developing for it.
Sony won't have nearly as large a head-start this time. Sure, MS does this time around but in the Japanese market that's a non-issue. Nintendo might have a real chance at winning back its homeland. Especially with the Revmote so perfect for RPGs.

IceColdJanuary 14, 2006

Digital click shoulder buttons face-icon-small-tongue.gif

KDR_11kJanuary 14, 2006

If Enix puts their heart into Kenshin Dragon Quest, and it doesn't replace the regular Dragon Quest series, then the Revolution is going to be somewhat pointless. If it does replace the regular series, then Nintendo will be justified, and their victory (particularly in Japan) will be almost assured.

It won't replace DQ, at least not without a lot of kicking and screaming from the fans. People buy DQ to get a NES-style jRPG, not some fancy new kind of RPG with minigames, action-laden battles, etc. Adding a manually controlled weapon to that would drive away the core fanbase of DQ. It'd be akin to giving Mario a waterpack that allows him to shoot and fly: It goes against the very reason people buy the game (in Mario's case, precision jumping and running which were severely compromised by the waterpack).

Dear KDR_11k. I like the Tanooki suit and Super cape. What about you? Considering Super Mario Sunshine is often considered "too hard," I don't think the '"compromised" difficulty level is why some dislike that game.

kirby_killer_dededeJanuary 15, 2006

Quote

Originally posted by: Mario
Maybe there is some substance to that old "Dragon Quest EXPLODES on to Nintendo Revolution" rumor after all?


That wasn't a rumor, I saw it, I swear! >_<

KDR_11kJanuary 15, 2006

TYP: The flying didn't distract as much from the game, most importantly because it wasn't used as often and required powerups. With FLUDD, the levels included many parts that noone would associate with Mario (especially the whole cleaning up slime stuff). I don't think anyone objected to the "secret" levels (though I think they could have used a few mid-level checkpoints) because what you did in those was going from point A to point B and dealing with hazards along the path, they complained about level goals like "race on a blooper" or "clean up all the slime" and that almost all levels were mandatory (no getting stars/shines out of order or leaving a world untouched).

kirby_killer_dededeJanuary 15, 2006

Hrm...anyone want to dig up that old thread that Mario mentioned? I can't seem to find it, spent half an hour.

nitsu niflheimJanuary 15, 2006

Quote

Originally posted by: KDR_11k
TYP: The flying didn't distract as much from the game, most importantly because it wasn't used as often and required powerups. With FLUDD, the levels included many parts that noone would associate with Mario (especially the whole cleaning up slime stuff). I don't think anyone objected to the "secret" levels (though I think they could have used a few mid-level checkpoints) because what you did in those was going from point A to point B and dealing with hazards along the path, they complained about level goals like "race on a blooper" or "clean up all the slime" and that almost all levels were mandatory (no getting stars/shines out of order or leaving a world untouched).



I objected to the secret levels, I found them out of place and should not have been required levels. I think they should have been optional for extra shine's, for the fact that they were out of place and completely against the rest of the game, and for me they were just plain ass annoying and the reason why I stopped playing the game. If It wasn't for that, I could have dealt with the rest of the game.

Bill AurionJanuary 15, 2006

It's Mario, so if anything it SHOULD be out of place... face-icon-small-smile.gif

Tangent: If any of you owns a PS2 and hasn't at least rented Dragon Quest VIII, get to it. Amazing game, so addictive. My game clock shows 105 hours and I'm not quite finished...that's the most I've played anything this generation except SSBM.

KDR_11kJanuary 17, 2006

It's said to be rather repetitive (even by RPG standards) so I'll rather stay away.

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