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Shigeru Miyamoto NOT Stepping Down from His Position at Nintendo

by Pedro Hernandez - December 7, 2011, 6:57 pm PST
Total comments: 67 Source: (Wired.com), http://www.wired.com/gamelife/2011/12/miyamoto-int...

UPDATE: While Miyamoto will be focusing on smaller projects, he will NOT be retiring from game development altogether.

UPDATE: A Reuters report refuted the news that Shigeru Miyamoto will be stepping down from his position at Nintendo. A spokesperson from Nintendo denied the allegations made on Wired's interview, saying that Miyamoto simply wanted to train the new generation. After the announcement, Nintendo's shares fell two percent and partially recovered after the denial.

Nintendo lead designer Shigeru Miyamoto will be stepping down from his position at Nintendo in order to work on smaller projects, Wired.com confirms.

Miyamoto mentioned in an interview on Wired.com that he has been mentioning that he will be retiring soon, and will step down from working on big titles like Super Mario 3D Land and The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword. “Inside our office, I’ve been recently declaring, ‘I’m going to retire, I’m going to retire,’” Miyamoto said. “I’m not saying that I’m going to retire from game development altogether. What I mean by retiring is, retiring from my current position.”

The reason as to why he is stepping down is because he hopes to work on smaller, more personal video game projects instead of titles that have up to a five-year development cycle.

Despite the decision, he has high hopes for the development teams he has taught throughout the years. “The reason why I’m stressing that is that unless I say that I’m retiring, I cannot nurture the young developers,” he said. “After all, if I’m there in my position as it is, then there’s always kind of a relationship. And the young guys are always kind of in a situation where they have to listen to my ideas. But I need some people who are growing up much more than today.” 

He concluded that he is looking forward to working with new, younger development teams.

Talkback

TrueNerdDecember 07, 2011

AHHHH! AHHHHHHHH! AHHHHHHHH! AHHHHH!

EnnerDecember 07, 2011

It's gotta happen sometime.


I wonder if this will mean he will be hands-on on Nintendo eShop games.

As I said in the other thread, I think this is going to be great, for Nintendo and for us.

joshnickersonDecember 07, 2011

Why are people upset about this? Miyamoto's going back to hands-on game development; in what way is that not awesome?

TrueNerdDecember 07, 2011

I must admit I overreacted when I first posted. I thought he was leaving entirely. I'm okay now.

TJ SpykeDecember 07, 2011

But on smaller games, he will not be involved in stuff like the next console Mario game. I am glad he will still be involved with games, but it's a little sad to see he won't be involved in the next AAA Mario or Zelda games.

joshnickersonDecember 07, 2011

Because we love the drama.

But I agree with you Mr. Insanolord. Though it's gonna be weird that the next big Mario game may not have his involvement, I look forward to see what little gems Miyamoto comes up with.

Dman15December 07, 2011

Is it sad that I almost cried until i read the article?
also joshnickerson, that just cheered me up. Thanks  :)

CaterkillerMatthew Osborne, Contributing WriterDecember 07, 2011

My daughter will be born out of the age of miyamoto.

martyDecember 07, 2011

Good for him

He helped make some games I liked and some games I thought were trash.

Chozo GhostDecember 07, 2011

What we need to worry about now is who will take his place. That's some pretty senior position he had, so we don't want some total dunce getting promoted to that. It could be devastating for the company.

SageprotectorDecember 07, 2011

I wish Miyamoto-san the very best in his future endeavors. At least he'll still be around. :3


As said before, this had to happen sometime.

I've been expecting this for years. He never seemed comfortable with the "super producer" kind of role. He lost the ability to focus on just one or two games at a time. And his production style, which is highly experimental and can turn on a dime at any point in the project ("up-ending the tea table") is not well-suited to gigantic, multi-year projects.

ShyGuyDecember 07, 2011

Miyamoto is the best ever :( 

This is a sign. The world ends in 2012.

Chozo GhostDecember 07, 2011

Quote from: Jonnyboy117

("up-ending the tea table")

Doesn't that make him kinda like Jesus?

StrawHousePigDecember 07, 2011

Quote from: Dman15

Is it sad that I almost cried until i read the article?

Not at all. The headline is total click bait.

Miyamoto has been one of very few to deeply affect the way we interact with technology, the way we see technology and entertainment, the way it becomes woven into our culture and our lives. He has a certain undefinable quality shared by the likes of Steve Jobs. Watching guys like that talk about something they want to show you is worlds different than when a salesman or other meat puppet tries to do it (I'm looking at you, Reggie!). He was in tune with the way a thing should be and luckily for us could get it done that way.

I'm as interested as anyone in what he may come up with, but this (losing the wide reaching direct influence of a creative giant) is still a blow to the future of gaming. Though I'm glad, or at least truly hope, that he'll be getting out with his health intact. To him I say cheers, thank you, and please keep in touch.

RasDecember 08, 2011

Kind of reminds me of how Lucas said he was walking away from blockbusters to focus on smaller, experimental films.  Not to compare Miyamoto to Lucas.  :D

I'll admit that I was stunned and saddened by the headline, but he's got some good people in place like Aonuma, Konno and Koizumi.  Maybe he'll start coming up with some great, new IPs for the Wii U era.

Chozo GhostDecember 08, 2011

Miyamoto is almost 60, but its not like the work he does is physically strenous, so there's no reason for him to have to retire anytime soon. I assume he also loves what he does, so even though he has tons of money he would probably want to stick around anyway and not retire. So hopefully we will get at least another 20 years worth of creativity out of him.

BlackNMild2k1December 08, 2011

Looks like lots of sites reported the story as the title of this one without the context, or a bunch of investors only read the headline and not the actual story (no surprise there).

But Nintendo issued a denial of retirement stating that

Quote:

"This is absolutely not true," said a spokeswoman for Nintendo. "There seems to have been a misunderstanding. He has said all along that he wants to train the younger generation.

"He has no intention of stepping down. Please do not be concerned."

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/12/08/us-nintendo-idUSTRE7B70C520111208

So it seems sensationalistic headlines and (LOL Didn't Read.meme) win the day.
Nintendo's shares have dropped 2% because of this story.

So cancel your Wii U pre-orders and sell your 3DS's, Nintendo is DOOOMED!! and there is no saving her now....

NWR_pap64Pedro Hernandez, Contributing WriterDecember 08, 2011

I'm not that sad or upset that he is stepping down to focus on smaller projects and let the newer development teams handle the games. If you guys paid attention for the last few years, his big games were mostly stuff like pets and sports, simple games with the focus being on the concept rather than the whole scope. Games like Super Mario Galaxy and such were mostly done by other development teams with his supervision. Even the newer Zelda games are done by different development teams. Miyamoto simply did this in steps rather than just going "WELP! IMMA GETTIN' OLD, SO I QUIT!", letting the smaller teams get to know him and how his development process goes.


I don't see this as the end of the world or even the end of an era. Miyamoto is simply a master that knows his limits and is know ready to pass the baton, but is doing it in a subtle way.

ShyGuyDecember 08, 2011

Miyamoto HAS no limits. Miyamoto and Batman.

My first reaction was horror, but when I read that he was just moving on from Zelda/Mario to work on new, smaller projects, it piqued my curiosity.  So do we expect to see e-shop/Wiiware games from Miyamoto now?

With the exception of the DS Zelda games, I believe that the Zelda and Mario series will be in capable hands.  They are too much of a established institution to crumble without him, and maybe him stepping down from this position will allow those development teams to own those franchises in new and unthought-of ways.

Maybe without all of the bloat from long development times and large teams, he can churn out quality games at a quicker rate.

MassimoDecember 08, 2011

I think this could be really exciting... I'm looking forward to seeing what he can do in this new position of "indie" developer inside Nintendo. I've always thought his talent was kind of wasted in the role of producer. He could be more creative working as a director. He said more than once that he likes working with small teams. And let's not forget that a game like "A link to the Past" is a "small" production by today's standards!

oohhboyHong Hang Ho, Staff AlumnusDecember 08, 2011

This a pretty sweet move on his part. Sure, he has made a lot of game since becoming a producer, but very few were personal to him and when he did placed is hand to make such a game, it showed how good he still is.

I can't wait to see what kind of table flipping ideas he has, now that he isn't constrained by his position while still having the resources.

Don't compare hm to Lucas, that man is a hack and will always be a hack.

StrawHousePigDecember 08, 2011

Well now this sounds exactly like what he's done for years already.

WIRED!!!  >:(

CericDecember 08, 2011

I'm with Dr. Metts. This has been coming for a very long time.  Miyamoto never seemed comfortable in his Super role.  Him moving to an official professoral role, teaching and experimenting, seems like a good fit for him.

On some other things bantered around here, just because a job isn't physically strenuous doesn't mean it can't take a toll on you just as hard if not harder.

martyDecember 08, 2011

Quote from: StrawHousePig

Well now this sounds exactly like what he's done for years already.

WIRED!!!  :@

I think it's a budget thing, mostly.

Miyamoto has burrowed himself deep enough that Nintendo would look foolish to get rid of him but he's probably not paying the bills for the amount of resources he uses.

martyDecember 08, 2011

Quote from: oohhboy

Don't compare hm to Lucas, that man is a hack and will always be a hack.

I think it's a pretty good comparison.

They both produced world shaping works when they had their backs to the wall and once the pressure was off, they couldn't recreate their earlier success.

CericDecember 08, 2011

Quote from: marty

Quote from: oohhboy

Don't compare hm to Lucas, that man is a hack and will always be a hack.

I think it's a pretty good comparison.

They both produced world shaping works when they had their backs to the wall and once the pressure was off, they couldn't recreate their earlier success.

The difference is that Miyamoto doesn't go around and try to butcher his work for kicks.
He also didn't make as many out of industry standards, THX for Lucas.

martyDecember 08, 2011

Quote from: Ceric

Quote from: marty

Quote from: oohhboy

Don't compare hm to Lucas, that man is a hack and will always be a hack.

I think it's a pretty good comparison.

They both produced world shaping works when they had their backs to the wall and once the pressure was off, they couldn't recreate their earlier success.

The difference is that Miyamoto doesn't go around and try to butcher his work for kicks.
He also didn't make as many out of industry standards, THX for Lucas.

Eh, itteration is videogame industry standard.  AND 3D classics would like to have a word with you, lol.

CericDecember 08, 2011

Quote from: marty

Quote from: Ceric

Quote from: marty

Quote from: oohhboy

Don't compare hm to Lucas, that man is a hack and will always be a hack.

I think it's a pretty good comparison.

They both produced world shaping works when they had their backs to the wall and once the pressure was off, they couldn't recreate their earlier success.

The difference is that Miyamoto doesn't go around and try to butcher his work for kicks.
He also didn't make as many out of industry standards, THX for Lucas.

Eh, itteration is videogame industry standard.  AND 3D classics would like to have a word with you, lol.

You came up with Iteration?  Iteration is a development in general standard.  Plus I haven't read anywhere that Miyamoto had any direct influences over the 3DS Classics.

Miyamoto is a gaming Icon but, he hasn't directly pushed any change outside of the Videogame industry.  Though I'm still waiting on my Miyamoto Edition Banjo to be created.

I'm sure I'm missing something and I'm waiting to hear it.  For Science!

Quote from: marty

Quote from: oohhboy

Don't compare hm to Lucas, that man is a hack and will always be a hack.

I think it's a pretty good comparison.

They both produced world shaping works when they had their backs to the wall and once the pressure was off, they couldn't recreate their earlier success.

The last game he directed was Ocarina of Time. Doesn't get much more world-shaping than that in my book.

Ian SaneDecember 08, 2011

I really love Miyamoto the game designer but never really cared for Miyamoto the executive producer type.  I don't like Nintendo's current direction and I hold Iwata and Miyamoto responsible.  Miyamoto is probably the best game desiger ever but he also suggests incredibly stupid ideas like going with cartridges on the N64.  He should stick strictly to games.

Though at this point I imagine the smaller projects he's working on are going to be lots of self-indulgent quirky titles that won't grab my interest.  He's getting old and it shows in the ideas he is interested in.  Stuff like Nintendogs and Wii Sports are the sort of ideas an older man would be interested in as they are slow paced and relaxed.  Even Pikmin, a brilliant game, was influenced by gardening which I have no interest in.  When he was younger he was making games based on the make-believe adventures he had in caves he explored as a kid.  It's the sort of influence that results in more exciting games.

At some point Nintendo can't use Miyamoto as a crutch.  If they're screwed without him then they're screwed and that is that.  I think new blood in Nintendo would be a good thing as they've become stale and new blood will instinctively want to do more creative things than just Mario and Zelda forever and ever.

The best era for Nintendo was when both Miyamoto and Yokoi were working for them and had similar roles.  The two were about equal in talent but different enough to provide variety to Nintendo's lineup.  Something like that again would be nice.  Miyamoto having his finger in every pot is good for quality standards but results in too homogenous of a style.

Luigi DudeDecember 08, 2011

Quote from: Ian

The best era for Nintendo was when both Miyamoto and Yokoi were working for them and had similar roles.  The two were about equal in talent but different enough to provide variety to Nintendo's lineup.  Something like that again would be nice.  Miyamoto having his finger in every pot is good for quality standards but results in too homogenous of a style.


What are you talking about?  Miyamoto is only involved in the EAD related Nintendo games.  Everything that's non EAD is run by completly different people with their own styles.  Just play something from an EAD studio and than play something from Nintendo's other top studio's like Intelligent Systems, Retro, HAL, SPD, Game Freak, or Monolith Soft (Xenoblades finally coming to America so you have no excuse) and you'll see there's still a lot of variety in Nintendo's lineup.

Ian SaneDecember 08, 2011

Miyamoto does involve himself with non-EAD projects.  He told Retro to switch Metroid Prime to first person (a great idea) and told Rare to shoehorn Star Fox into Dinosaur Planet (a terrible idea).  If a Nintendo dev is making a game and Shiggy has some bug up his butt about something in the design, it changes.

LithiumDecember 08, 2011

this is a good thing. with new people up top we're going to get fresh ideas, maybe even new I.Ps

ThanerosDecember 08, 2011

I also think this is great news! Hopefully he will make some new much needed IP's for Nintendo

Luigi DudeDecember 08, 2011

Quote from: Ian

Miyamoto does involve himself with non-EAD projects.  He told Retro to switch Metroid Prime to first person (a great idea) and told Rare to shoehorn Star Fox into Dinosaur Planet (a terrible idea).  If a Nintendo dev is making a game and Shiggy has some bug up his butt about something in the design, it changes.

Yes in the 90's until 2002, Miyamoto was the guy who overlooked a lot of games that were developed by second party developers in order to make sure things were going right.  The thing is, Miyamoto stopped doing this in 2002 and Kensuke Tanabe has been in charge of overlooking western made Nintendo games since.

So the charge that Miyamoto is effecting everything doesn't hold true anymore unless your talking about EAD studio related games.

martyDecember 08, 2011

Quote from: Ceric

Quote from: marty

Quote from: Ceric

Quote from: marty

Quote from: oohhboy

Don't compare hm to Lucas, that man is a hack and will always be a hack.

I think it's a pretty good comparison.

They both produced world shaping works when they had their backs to the wall and once the pressure was off, they couldn't recreate their earlier success.

The difference is that Miyamoto doesn't go around and try to butcher his work for kicks.
He also didn't make as many out of industry standards, THX for Lucas.

Eh, itteration is videogame industry standard.  AND 3D classics would like to have a word with you, lol.

You came up with Iteration?  Iteration is a development in general standard.  Plus I haven't read anywhere that Miyamoto had any direct influences over the 3DS Classics.

Miyamoto is a gaming Icon but, he hasn't directly pushed any change outside of the Videogame industry.  Though I'm still waiting on my Miyamoto Edition Banjo to be created.

I'm sure I'm missing something and I'm waiting to hear it.  For Science!

LOL, poor sentence construction on my part when using the term standard.  It's common (A Standard, if you will) for all software to get revisions (iterations) yes.  Movies are held to a different standard (ha) and it's not cool for them to get updates regardless if Lucas really had all these ideas that weren't realized because of limited technology.

People don't care that Super Mario All-Stars isn't the same as the orignials with an added save feature and updated graphics. 

StogiDecember 08, 2011

I don't know if I like this, but I can't say that I hate it either.

On the one hand, I'd love for him to get back to experimenting and developing on a smaller level. Hell that's how he started and that's why we love him. But on the other hand, who is going to take his place? What does it mean for all the IP's he has nurtured along the way? I don't like the idea of Miyamoto not touching Mario or Zelda. It's like Franz Shubert giving away his unfinished symphony.

But then the realist in me reminds myself that it had to happen eventually. So would I rather have him gone or simply back to where he started? The answer is obvious. So I wait, with bated breath, to see the future.

martyDecember 08, 2011

Quote from: NWR_insanolord

Quote from: marty

Quote from: oohhboy

Don't compare hm to Lucas, that man is a hack and will always be a hack.

I think it's a pretty good comparison.

They both produced world shaping works when they had their backs to the wall and once the pressure was off, they couldn't recreate their earlier success.

The last game he directed was Ocarina of Time. Doesn't get much more world-shaping than that in my book.

I'm sorry but that's just a subjective thing.  OoT might be a good game and if you like it a lot, that's cool with me, but it didn't propell the N64 to great heights and its sequel, which you might like as well, didn't set the world on fire either.  You'd think a great game would sell its sequel but that's not the case with OoT at all. 

Quote from: Ian

Though at this point I imagine the smaller projects he's working on are going to be lots of self-indulgent quirky titles that won't grab my interest.  He's getting old and it shows in the ideas he is interested in.  Stuff like Nintendogs and Wii Sports are the sort of ideas an older man would be interested in as they are slow paced and relaxed.  Even Pikmin, a brilliant game, was influenced by gardening which I have no interest in.  When he was younger he was making games based on the make-believe adventures he had in caves he explored as a kid.  It's the sort of influence that results in more exciting games.

I agree with Ian, I could see the titles he would make as the main director being too small in scope, and too quirky to have any real impact. Everyone wants him to return to being less of a producer and going back to being more on the director side, but I just don't think he would try to make the sorts of games that people want him to, or at least the majority would be interested in playing. If that happens people would start writing things about how he's no good at all and can't produce real games anymore, likely even questioning his 'talent' from past games he was involved with.


I would be very excited for him to actually create his own games again though, and I just hope that not all of them would be really small in scope. Maybe this new character he spoke of awhile ago could come out in a game next year?

Quote from: marty

Quote from: NWR_insanolord

Quote from: marty

Quote from: oohhboy

Don't compare hm to Lucas, that man is a hack and will always be a hack.

I think it's a pretty good comparison.

They both produced world shaping works when they had their backs to the wall and once the pressure was off, they couldn't recreate their earlier success.

The last game he directed was Ocarina of Time. Doesn't get much more world-shaping than that in my book.

I'm sorry but that's just a subjective thing.  OoT might be a good game and if you like it a lot, that's cool with me, but it didn't propell the N64 to great heights and its sequel, which you might like as well, didn't set the world on fire either.  You'd think a great game would sell its sequel but that's not the case with OoT at all.

What Oot did propel the N64 to great heights! That and Mario 64 are prime examples of being the best on the system, and pretty much everyone had at least one of them. Majoras Mask sold less because it came out late, and people did not like the concept as much such as the time limit. The general thinking at the time was that the game was a little too different to what people actually wanted.

Ian SaneDecember 08, 2011

People seem to forget that Majora's Mask REQUIRED the N64 expansion pack.  That might have limited its sales a bit.  Perfect Dark also used to get flack for not selling as well as Goldeneye and it essentially required the pack as well.  I never even thought of this until just now but that probably played a big part in the underwhelming sales of those titles.

Regardless of what OoT did for the N64, it influenced game design as a whole.  A lot of its unique features like Z-targeting and the context sensitive action button have become routine.

Quote from: marty

Quote from: NWR_insanolord

Quote from: marty

Quote from: oohhboy

Don't compare hm to Lucas, that man is a hack and will always be a hack.

I think it's a pretty good comparison.

They both produced world shaping works when they had their backs to the wall and once the pressure was off, they couldn't recreate their earlier success.

The last game he directed was Ocarina of Time. Doesn't get much more world-shaping than that in my book.

I'm sorry but that's just a subjective thing.  OoT might be a good game and if you like it a lot, that's cool with me, but it didn't propell the N64 to great heights and its sequel, which you might like as well, didn't set the world on fire either.  You'd think a great game would sell its sequel but that's not the case with OoT at all. 

Actually, it's not subjective at all. Ocarina of Time set the standard for that style of game, and you can still see its influence in games being made today (not just from Nintendo). The subjective aspects of it are irrelevant; it has had more of an impact on gaming than almost any game since (Halo and GTA III are probably in the same discussion, just in terms of influence).

If you bring the subjectiveness into it it's a landmark title that still gets called the greatest game of all time; I was talking to someone in one of my classes the other day who doesn't really play games much anymore, and when he does it's not on Nintendo platforms, but he still considered Ocarina of Time an all time great. The idea that Majora's Mask's relatively lackluster performance can be attributed in any way to Ocarina of Time is ridiculous.

martyDecember 08, 2011

Quote from: NWR_insanolord

Quote from: marty

Quote from: NWR_insanolord

Quote from: marty

Quote from: oohhboy

Don't compare hm to Lucas, that man is a hack and will always be a hack.

I think it's a pretty good comparison.

They both produced world shaping works when they had their backs to the wall and once the pressure was off, they couldn't recreate their earlier success.

The last game he directed was Ocarina of Time. Doesn't get much more world-shaping than that in my book.

I'm sorry but that's just a subjective thing.  OoT might be a good game and if you like it a lot, that's cool with me, but it didn't propell the N64 to great heights and its sequel, which you might like as well, didn't set the world on fire either.  You'd think a great game would sell its sequel but that's not the case with OoT at all. 

Actually, it's not subjective at all. Ocarina of Time set the standard for that style of game, and you can still see its influence in games being made today (not just from Nintendo). The subjective aspects of it are irrelevant; it has had more of an impact on gaming than almost any game since (Halo and GTA III are probably in the same discussion, just in terms of influence).

If you bring the subjectiveness into it it's a landmark title that still gets called the greatest game of all time; I was talking to someone in one of my classes the other day who doesn't really play games much anymore, and when he does it's not on Nintendo platforms, but he still considered Ocarina of Time an all time great. The idea that Majora's Mask's relatively lackluster performance can be attributed in any way to Ocarina of Time is ridiculous.

We'll have to agree to disagree then.

You can't really disagree with Oot's impact on video games. Both it and Mario 64 basically showed the world how to make 3D games work.

Quote from: marty

Quote from: NWR_insanolord

Quote from: marty

Quote from: NWR_insanolord

Quote from: marty

Quote from: oohhboy

Don't compare hm to Lucas, that man is a hack and will always be a hack.

I think it's a pretty good comparison.

They both produced world shaping works when they had their backs to the wall and once the pressure was off, they couldn't recreate their earlier success.

The last game he directed was Ocarina of Time. Doesn't get much more world-shaping than that in my book.

I'm sorry but that's just a subjective thing.  OoT might be a good game and if you like it a lot, that's cool with me, but it didn't propell the N64 to great heights and its sequel, which you might like as well, didn't set the world on fire either.  You'd think a great game would sell its sequel but that's not the case with OoT at all. 

Actually, it's not subjective at all. Ocarina of Time set the standard for that style of game, and you can still see its influence in games being made today (not just from Nintendo). The subjective aspects of it are irrelevant; it has had more of an impact on gaming than almost any game since (Halo and GTA III are probably in the same discussion, just in terms of influence).

If you bring the subjectiveness into it it's a landmark title that still gets called the greatest game of all time; I was talking to someone in one of my classes the other day who doesn't really play games much anymore, and when he does it's not on Nintendo platforms, but he still considered Ocarina of Time an all time great. The idea that Majora's Mask's relatively lackluster performance can be attributed in any way to Ocarina of Time is ridiculous.

We'll have to agree to disagree then.

I'm not going to agree to disagree with you, because you're simply wrong. Whether you like it or not, Ocarina of Time had a massive influence on the entire gaming industry.

Z Targeting alone changed 3D gaming irrevocably. That's one aspect of OoT.

ThePermDecember 09, 2011

oh Z targeting,  too bad tomb Raider had it first...

martyDecember 09, 2011

Quote from: NWR_insanolord

I'm not going to agree to disagree with you, because you're simply wrong. Whether you like it or not, Ocarina of Time had a massive influence on the entire gaming industry.

where?  Where are the OoT clones?  What mark did Oot leave?  I look around and don't see it.

Well sure, there haven't been many clones, but that's true of the whole Zelda series. For whatever reason, other developers haven't tried to copy it wholesale as much as some of Nintendo's other franchises.

EnnerDecember 09, 2011

For me, it's the little things. Nearly all third-person action games with melee combat feature some sort of button to lock on a target. Context-sensitive buttons (not sure if OoT was the first game to use it or made it better known). Auto-jumping that frees up buttons for other actions in games like Batman: Arkham Asylum and Assassin's Creed.

Ocarina of Time's influences are a bit harder to spot since there haven't deluge of action-adventure games. It seems the industry fad went from platformers to shooters.

Luigi DudeDecember 09, 2011

The reason there hasn't many Zelda clones is probably has to do with how the puzzles in Zelda games require a lot of work to make which is why nobody wants to clone them.  Zelda games are a combination of action and puzzle adventure games with large worlds to explore.  This is why even though Ocarina of Time helped revolutionize 3D gaming, there's barely any third party games similar to it.  The rest of the industry copied the action and large world parts, but doesn't care much about the puzzles.

Ian SaneDecember 09, 2011

It's funny that we're arguing about OoT because if you're talking about Miyamoto changing the world THAT game isn't the ideal example.  Shiggy made FUCKIN' SUPER MARIO BROS!!!  No troll can make any argument worth two shits that THAT game didn't have a huge impact on videogames!  Practically every game for the next ten years was a glorified clone of it.

The original incorrect point from which this argument spawned was that he implied that Miyamoto had lost his touch and that his later games couldn't live up to his early work, to which I responded by pointing out that the last time he directed a game he made Ocarina of Time, so that argument doesn't make sense.

Ian SaneDecember 09, 2011

How about using Super Mario 64 as an example then?  That's only two years older.

martyDecember 09, 2011

Quote from: NWR_insanolord

The original incorrect point from which this argument spawned was that he implied that Miyamoto had lost his touch and that his later games couldn't live up to his early work, to which I responded by pointing out that the last time he directed a game he made Ocarina of Time, so that argument doesn't make sense.

I don't know if you're dense or trolling or just don't understand english.

Quote from: ME]They

SMB was way more successful that OoT, No two ways about it.

Well then you're wrong the other way, because Lucas' later films were just as successful as his older ones, at least from a financial standpoint. So either way it's a bad analogy.

Also, comparing SMB and OoT that way is ridiculous, as they came out in completely different situations. You could make a good argument that no game has ever or realistically will ever be as successful as Super Mario Bros. was, and that's almost entirely because of the environment it came about in.

martyDecember 09, 2011

Quote from: NWR_insanolord

Well then you're wrong the other way, because Lucas' later films were just as successful as his older ones, at least from a financial standpoint. So either way it's a bad analogy.

Also, comparing SMB and OoT that way is ridiculous, as they came out in completely different situations. You could make a good argument that no game has ever or realistically will ever be as successful as Super Mario Bros. was, and that's almost entirely because of the environment it came about in.

HA, you have no argument to make.

Luigi DudeDecember 09, 2011

You know, this topic makes me feel bad for Takashi Tezuka.  The guy deserves just as much credit for all the games Miyamoto made since he was Miyamoto's partner in making all of them.  Hell Tezuka is just as high ranking at Nintendo with almost as much influence, but he's usually ignored by fans and the media.

Chozo GhostDecember 09, 2011

Quote from: Luigi

You know, this topic makes me feel bad for Takashi Tezuka.  The guy deserves just as much credit for all the games Miyamoto made since he was Miyamoto's partner in making all of them.  Hell Tezuka is just as high ranking at Nintendo with almost as much influence, but he's usually ignored by fans and the media.

Maybe its his own fault though. He needs to step out of the shadows and upend a few tea tables so that people take notice of him.

Luigi DudeDecember 09, 2011

Quote from: Chozo

Maybe its his own fault though. He needs to step out of the shadows and upend a few tea tables so that people take notice of him.

That is true.  From a lot of interviews Tezuka is a pretty shy and timid person, while Miyamoto is the complete opposite.  Of course this is probably a good thing when you think about it since if Tezuka had the same personality, they probably would have fought all the time and Tezuka would have eventually left the company, which would have resulted in some of Nintendo's greatest games not being anywhere as good as they were because he wouldn't have been around to help make them.

Still though, I feel bad for the guy.  A rumor comes out that Miyamoto might retire and the world goes crazy, but if Tezuka was to ever officially announce he was retiring, everyone would be like, "who's he"?  Dude's literally the most famous unknown game designer.

Chozo GhostDecember 10, 2011

Sounds like he is the Teller to Miyamoto's Penn.

ThePermDecember 10, 2011

Quote from: Luigi

You know, this topic makes me feel bad for Takashi Tezuka.  The guy deserves just as much credit for all the games Miyamoto made since he was Miyamoto's partner in making all of them.  Hell Tezuka is just as high ranking at Nintendo with almost as much influence, but he's usually ignored by fans and the media.

unless he likes it that way. and he give Miyamoto a lot of shit about it. "hey here come your fans, mwahahaah"

Tezuka ninja vanishes.

Mop it upDecember 10, 2011

Quote from: Luigi

You know, this topic makes me feel bad for Takashi Tezuka.  The guy deserves just as much credit for all the games Miyamoto made since he was Miyamoto's partner in making all of them.  Hell Tezuka is just as high ranking at Nintendo with almost as much influence, but he's usually ignored by fans and the media.

Sounds like he's the inspiration for Luigi.

StogiDecember 10, 2011

Quote from: ThePerm

Quote from: Luigi

You know, this topic makes me feel bad for Takashi Tezuka.  The guy deserves just as much credit for all the games Miyamoto made since he was Miyamoto's partner in making all of them.  Hell Tezuka is just as high ranking at Nintendo with almost as much influence, but he's usually ignored by fans and the media.

unless he likes it that way. and he give Miyamoto a lot of shit about it. "hey here come your fans, mwahahaah"

Tezuka ninja vanishes.

Hahaha just what I was thinking.

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