Wii

Classic Controller Pro Announced for North America

by Andy Goergen - January 25, 2010, 7:27 am PST
Total comments: 72

The modified controller will be bundled with Monster Hunter Tri.

Today Capcom and Nintendo announced that the Classic Controller Pro, the redesigned version of the current Classic Controller, will be bundled in North America with Monster Hunter Tri. The controller was previously only available in Japan and Europe. The game is set to launch in America sometime after April 1, 2010 but no firm launch date has been announced.

The Classic Controller Pro bundled with Monster Hunter Tri will be black, however both black and white versions will be available at retail separate from the bundle at a suggested retail price of $19.99. The Monster Hunter Tri bundle will be available for $59.99, and without the controller for $49.99.

The Classic Controller Pro is compatible with all games that support the original Classic Controller, however it does not feature analog shoulder buttons like the original classic controller. Any games that support the analog shoulder buttons of the Classic Controller would not function in exactly the same way as on the Classic Controller Pro.

The Classic Controller Pro differs from the original model in that it has been remodeled with stacked shoulder buttons and analog sticks that sit further apart from each other. The controller also contains side grips making it sit more comfortably in your hand.

THE PERFECT BUNDLE FOR HUNTING SEASON: MONSTER HUNTER® TRI AND WII CLASSIC CONTROLLER PRO

Bundle Will Bring the Highly- Anticipated New Controller and Popular Franchise Together for the Ultimate Monster Hunting Experience on the Wii System

SAN MATEO, CA, and REDMOND, WA, - January 25, 2010 - Capcom® Entertainment, a leading worldwide developer and publisher of video games, and Nintendo of America today announced an exciting new bundle featuring one of the most highly anticipated titles for 2010, Monster Hunter® Tri, and combining it with the new Classic Controller Pro™ for the Wii™ system. The Classic Controller Pro's more traditional control configuration will give gamers the ultimate Monster Hunting experience when the bundle becomes available in North America this April at a suggested retail price of $59.99.

"Monster Hunter Tri has made a huge splash in the Japanese market, and we're confident the bundle with the Classic Controller Pro will give fans in North America plenty to get excited about," said Steve Singer, Nintendo of America's vice president of Licensing. "Gamers of all kinds enjoy playing games on Wii. Monster Hunter Tri delivers an incredible new experience on Wii, while the Classic Controller Pro gives players even more control options for their favorite Wii games."

The new Classic Controller Pro includes a second row of shoulder buttons and ergonomically friendly grips. The Classic Controller Pro plugs directly into the Wii Remote™ controller, and until now, has been available only in the Japanese market.

The Classic Controller Pro will be compatible with more than 450 Wii, WiiWare™ and Virtual Console™ games. The Classic Controller Pro bundled with Monster Hunter Tri will be black, while both black and white versions of the controller will also be available separately at a suggested retail price of $19.99. The game will also be available without a controller at a suggested retail price of $49.99.

Making its North American debut on Wii this spring, Monster Hunter Tri is one of the most strikingly beautiful titles developed for Nintendo's Wii system. Pushing the hardware to the limit, Monster Hunter Tri depicts a living, breathing ecosystem where humans co-exist with majestic monsters that roam both dry land and brand new sub-aqua environments – a first for the series. Offering the player varied control configurations to suit their style of play, players can choose between the Classic Controller Pro, Wii Remote™ and Nunchuck™, or Classic Controller™ to slay the monsters that inhabit the world.

The Monster Hunter series has sold over 11 million units worldwide and has become a social phenomenon in Japan giving rise to training camps, dedicated festivals and numerous licensed products. According to Media Create, Monster Hunter Tri sold 520,000 units in its first week of release in Japan and became the leading title sold across all platforms for the week of its release.

For more information about Monster Hunter Tri, please visit: http://press.capcom.com

ABOUT CAPCOM

Capcom is a leading worldwide developer, publisher and distributor of interactive entertainment for game consoles, PCs, handheld and wireless devices. Founded in 1983, the company has created hundreds of games, including best-selling franchises Resident Evil®, Street Fighter®, Mega Man® and Devil May Cry®. Capcom maintains operations in the U.S., U.K., Germany, France, Tokyo Korea and Hong Kong, with corporate headquarters located in Osaka, Japan. More information about Capcom can be found on the company web site, www.capcom.com.

Talkback

broodwarsJanuary 25, 2010

Hmm...I would have appreciated the thing being $15 instead of $20, but whatever.  We're finally getting the damn thing, which is good enough for me.

Incidentally, what games on the VC or Wii support analog shoulder buttons?  Smash Bros. Brawl, I suppose, but I can't think of many others.

Broodwars, I tried to do some quick research on exactly that for this news post, but couldn't find any results.  Anyone got that info?  I'm curious.

PaleMike Gamin, Contributing EditorJanuary 25, 2010

They need to somehow make Classic Controller Cube game compatibility work to coincide with this release.  That would be wonderful.

As it stands now, if I decide to get Monster Hunter, I'll probably get the bundle... otherwise I probably won't bother.

I do not regret spending $30 to get a Japanese CCPro back in October.

Regardless, I'm glad that this is coming stateside, though I can't say I'm surprised in the manner it is coming out. If I decide to get Monster Hunter, I'll most likely get the bundle, but that is a big IF.

KDR_11kJanuary 25, 2010

Quote from: broodwars

Hmm...I would have appreciated the thing being $15 instead of $20, but whatever.

MSRP is 30€ here, I only paid 25 because Toys'r'us had it cheaper.

kraken613January 25, 2010

Finally! I never got around to importing one.

UltimatePartyBearJanuary 25, 2010

Quote from: Pale

They need to somehow make Classic Controller Cube game compatibility work to coincide with this release.  That would be wonderful.

Without the analog shoulder buttons, it's not really a GC controller anymore, so I don't see why that would coincide with the CC Pro's release.  It really bugs me that Nintendo would take away functionality like that.

MaxiJanuary 25, 2010

I knew this was coming stateside. Great news!

SuperMario4EverJanuary 25, 2010

Finlay CCP is coming stateside cant wait 2 bye it

PaleMike Gamin, Contributing EditorJanuary 25, 2010

Quote from: UltimatePartyBear

Quote from: Pale

They need to somehow make Classic Controller Cube game compatibility work to coincide with this release.  That would be wonderful.

Without the analog shoulder buttons, it's not really a GC controller anymore, so I don't see why that would coincide with the CC Pro's release.  It really bugs me that Nintendo would take away functionality like that.

You're right that my pathetic attempt at linking the two is pretty much nullified by this, but I don't see why the shouldn't still do it.  Just make the triggers equate to a full press of the analog button and let people still use a cube controller for the few games that actually require analog triggers.

Ian SaneJanuary 25, 2010

It's cool that we're finally getting this in North America.

Though I probably won't get one.  I don't really use my classic controller much at all.  I don't buy VC games and of my Wii game collection it appears that every game either requires the use of the remote (Nintendo loves making us hold the controller sideways for example) or supports the Gamecube controller which usually I would rather use.  I got a classic controller early on, under the assumption that that would be the way I would often prefer to play.  But in practice it's pretty much been useless.  I WOULD use it if games like NSMB Wii supported it but it doesn't.

StratosJanuary 25, 2010

I'm pleasantly surprised.

I bought a regular CC but getting a second one would be nice if I want to play multiplayer on certain VC games.

TJ SpykeJanuary 26, 2010

Quote from: broodwars

Hmm...I would have appreciated the thing being $15 instead of $20, but whatever.

Consider that the regular Classic Controller is $20, and this one is better, there wasn't a snowball's chance in hell of it being less than $20.

broodwarsJanuary 26, 2010

Quote from: TJ

Quote from: broodwars

Hmm...I would have appreciated the thing being $15 instead of $20, but whatever.

Consider that the regular Classic Controller is $20, and this one is better, there wasn't a snowball's chance in hell of it being less than $20.

I know.  Just wishful thinking considering I find all the peripherals for all the consoles to be dramatically overpriced.

Great--this gives me a good excuse to buy a second Classic Controller for my 2-player VC games (and there are a few).

Mop it upJanuary 26, 2010

I don't own a Classic Controller because it doesn't look very comfortable, but the Pro version seems to fix that. I wasn't aware that the original Classic Controller had analogue shoulder buttons, and I never heard of any game that actually used them, probably because games which support the Classic Controller also allow for other controller options.

...In fact, other that Luigi's Mansion and Super Smash Brothers Melee, I can't think of a GameCube game that used the analogue shoulder buttons, and the two I mentioned didn't use them creatively.

NinGurl69 *hugglesJanuary 26, 2010

The Rogue Squadron games, Burnout 2, and Mario Sunshine, and Wave Race: Blue Storm, and Wind Waker, and Eternal Darkness, and F-Zero GX, and Battalion Wars, and and and and

Most players don't notice cuz they're the kind of weaklings who only know how to spam Left/Right on the stick in Mario Kart and forget the space in between can be used for gentle steering.

TJ SpykeJanuary 26, 2010

Mop, did you ever play games on the SNES? The Classic Controller feels pretty much like a SNES controller, and it's pretty much required if you want to play Super Mario World on VC (the button layout on the GCN controller makes it almost impossible to play SMW).

Mop it upJanuary 26, 2010

Quote from: TJ

Mop, did you ever play games on the SNES? The Classic Controller feels pretty much like a SNES controller, and it's pretty much required if you want to play Super Mario World on VC (the button layout on the GCN controller makes it almost impossible to play SMW).

I have an SNES and Super Mario World (plus pretty much every other SNES game the VC offers that's worth having) so I've no need to play Super Mario World on the VC. The SNES controller is usable but it just doesn't compare to any controller with handles.

Quote from: NinGurl69

The Rogue Squadron games, Burnout 2, and Mario Sunshine, and Wave Race: Blue Storm, and Wind Waker, and Eternal Darkness, and F-Zero GX, and Battalion Wars, and and and and

I forgot about the Burnout games, they used it for acceleration, though it wasn't necessary.
I don't recall Super Mario Sunshine using it for the waterpack, but I might not have tried it.
How was it used for Zelda: Wind Waker and Battalion Wars?

NinGurl69 *hugglesJanuary 26, 2010

Mario can control the power of his squirt.

Wind Waker and BW and ED use the soft trigger for lock-on, while the full trigger click will change targets without leaving the lock-on mode.

Burnout used analog for acceleration and braking.

KDR_11kJanuary 26, 2010

Also a full press in Sunshine locked you in place and let you control the aim while a partial press would let you run while squirting.

The CC is useful for Megadrive and C64 games too, e.g. The Last Ninja binds its weapon and inventory functions to CC buttons (they are bound to the F keys in the original)

It is technically impossible to enable Classic Controller support in GameCube games. So it's not worth debating.

I just got a Pro from Play-Asia; cost me about $40 after shipping, which sucks, but at least I don't have to wait until April to enjoy the thing. It feels so good that I may eventually buy another one at the normal price. Thank goodness NOA finally got around to announcing the Pro, and the price is totally reasonable and expected. I'm especially glad to see they are both bundling it with MH3 and selling it separately in both colors.

Sooooooooo want.

ShayminJanuary 27, 2010

I think this just dropped MH3 on my radar, if only because I can justify it as a $30 Pro + $30 MH3.

As someone who imported one of these and has spent time using this, let me assure anyone on the fence about this that you definitely want one. If you ever use the Classic Controller, this is totally worth it, an improvement across the board. I don't think I could ever go back to the original Classic Controller, which now needs to be given a stupid/clever nickname (a la DS Phat) to denote its inferiority.

CalibanJanuary 27, 2010

I hope I can trade in the old classic controllers...

Quote from: insanolord

a stupid/clever nickname (a la DS Phat) to denote its inferiority.

The DS Phat is NOT inferior!

Chozo GhostJanuary 27, 2010

I HATE HATE HATE the classic controller, which is a clone of the sucky PS2 controller setup. The analog stick should always be given top consideration. The D-PAD MUST ALWAYS BE SECONDARY. The gamecube controller and the xbox controller got this right. Sony was the only tards who didn't get it.

But now for some reason which makes no sesne at all, Nintendo has abandoned their perfect GC controller setup and copied the Sony controller, which is a low for Nintendo. Stooping to a new low when it has some sort of advantage is one thing, but Nintendo didn't need to do that and this is worse than what they already had with the GC controller.

All they needed to do was make a blue-tooth GC controller for the Wii and everything would have been good. The Classic Controller was absolutely not necessary at all.

Ian SaneJanuary 27, 2010

Quote:

I don't think I could ever go back to the original Classic Controller, which now needs to be given a stupid/clever nickname (a la DS Phat) to denote its inferiority.


Classic Controller Am?  Am being amateur in relation to Pro.

Quote:


The analog stick should always be given top consideration. The D-PAD MUST ALWAYS BE SECONDARY. The gamecube controller and the xbox controller got this right. Sony was the only tards who didn't get it.


I used to think this but I have since completely changed my mind.  D-pad centric is correct.  Why?  Because it's easier to use an analog stick in the non-central position than it is to use a d-pad.  Reaching over to the side to use a d-pad is practically unusable but reaching over to use an analog stick is barely harder at all (and we already do that with the second stick which no one complains about).  When I think of controller design I try to think of something that would work well with the vast majority of games throughout all of videogame history.  The Gamecube fails this test and the classic controller does not.  Sony's rather lazy method of just building onto what was already there has resulted in a very flexible controller.  The PS3 controller works perfectly with all Playstation games.  Nintendo's controllers can't make the same claim at all regarding all of their systems.  Hell, the Wii remote is worthless for anything not specifically designed for it.

If Nintendo didn't provide the classic controller the Gamecube controller would have been worthless for any SNES game because of the stupid face button layout (a classic example of fixing what was never broken).  The VC benefits from it.

NinGurl69 *hugglesJanuary 27, 2010

Are you forgetting something?  Humans have been reaching "to the side" to use the D-pad since the NES.  Nothing wrong with the GC D-Pad placement other than the limited surface area of the pad itself.  Tell me with a straight face that you would hold the GC controller the way you've always done (neatly wrapping the wings, thumbs pointing forward) if the D-pad and the left stick traded places.  That's crazy talk.  Don't tell me you have short-thumb syndrome or something.

Left/Right movement was greatly emphasized in 2D sidescrollers, so having the thumb point mostly sideways on the D-pad made sense.  Forward/Back movement was greatly emphasized in Nintendo's pioneering 3D games, therefore the Up/Down thumb direction has dictated the stick placement for 3 Nintendo generations (N64, Cube, Wii).

To hell with "to the side" analog sticks.

Quote from: Chozo

I HATE HATE HATE the classic controller, which is a clone of the sucky PS2 controller setup. The analog stick should always be given top consideration. The D-PAD MUST ALWAYS BE SECONDARY. The gamecube controller and the xbox controller got this right. Sony was the only tards who didn't get it.

But now for some reason which makes no sesne at all, Nintendo has abandoned their perfect GC controller setup and copied the Sony controller, which is a low for Nintendo. Stooping to a new low when it has some sort of advantage is one thing, but Nintendo didn't need to do that and this is worse than what they already had with the GC controller.

All they needed to do was make a blue-tooth GC controller for the Wii and everything would have been good. The Classic Controller was absolutely not necessary at all.

Generally I would agree with you, but the Classic Controller is a special case. I use the D-Pad on it way more often than the analog stick, and the way the D-Pad was on the GC controller was pretty bad.

Chozo GhostJanuary 27, 2010

Really though, I don't see why you need to use a D-Pad at all, ever. I know a lot of games on the VC were designed for the D-Pad, but what's wrong with just enabling the analog stick to do that job? All Nintendo had to do was build a controller with a stick that was analog for most games, but then resorts to the basic 4 cardinal direction digital functions for VC D-Pad games.

I KNOW this won't be a problem because I have a USB gamepad with the analog stick, and the stick can fill in just as well for D-PAD type games if necessary.

So what I'm saying is just eliminate the D-Pad entirely, once and for all. On the GC and most modern systems the D-Pad was seldom ever used as anything except as a way to quickly equip different items or switch weapons. Which made it basically just a glorified set of buttons, really. There's absolutely nothing about the D-Pad that couldn't be handled just as well with an analog stick running in a digital mode.

broodwarsJanuary 27, 2010

I use the D-pad more than the Analog Stick, but mainly because the Stick on the Classic Controller feels really loose (as in "GameCube C-Stick" levels of loose-ness).  If the one on the Pro feels much more solid, I may just revert to using that.  It also makes sense for the D-pad to be where it is on the CC since it is the primary control method for most of the games on the VC service.

As for the idea of removing the D-pad altogether in future Nintendo controllers, that makes no sense for me.  There are times when I need the exact-ness of a digital input, especially now that the D-pad tends to get used for toggling weapons/whatnot.

Ian SaneJanuary 27, 2010

Quote:

Are you forgetting something?  Humans have been reaching "to the side" to use the D-pad since the NES.


How the HELL did you ever hold an NES controller?  EVERYONE I know rests their thumb on the d-pad the entire time and the way they hold the controller the thumb naturally rests there.  No one reaches to the side on d-pad centric controller.

Quote:


So what I'm saying is just eliminate the D-Pad entirely, once and for all. On the GC and most modern systems the D-Pad was seldom ever used as anything except as a way to quickly equip different items or switch weapons. Which made it basically just a glorified set of buttons, really. There's absolutely nothing about the D-Pad that couldn't be handled just as well with an analog stick running in a digital mode.


Do you only play current games?  If you played games that were designed for digital input you would understand how incredibly imprecise and frustrating using an analog stick for the same purpose is.  And if you do play them and don't notice that doesn't mean that the problem doesn't exist.  I can't deal with it.  I don't consider fumbling with controls to ever be acceptable (which is why I give motion control such a hard time).

The irony is that if Nintendo went with just the remote without the nunchuk like they originally planned they would have chucked out the analog stick entirely in favour of the d-pad.  Nintendo now makes more d-pad games in the post-analog era than EVER.  So no wonder they made the classic controller d-pad centric.

NinGurl69 *hugglesJanuary 27, 2010

"How the HELL did you ever hold an NES controller?"

That's MY question.

StratosJanuary 27, 2010

Analog stick does not equal d-pad. I refuse to play games that way whenever possible.

Playing No More Heroes 2 last night made me see why they included CC support, it allows you to more comfortably play the retro mini games.

Mop it upJanuary 27, 2010

*imagines playing Tetris with an analogue stick*

*passes out from the sheer horror of the thought*

NinGurl69 *hugglesJanuary 27, 2010

I'd rather use the Wii pointer and pinch the blocks and rotate them with A+B.

TJ SpykeJanuary 27, 2010

Puzzle games are the ONLY games I think play better with a d-pad. For every other type of game a analog stick is much better. The analog stick should always have bigger focus than the d-pad on a controller precisely because fewer and fewer games are actually using the d-pad now.

The PS3 controller? Sony has always had the worst controllers in each gen (other than the Xbox "Duke" controller, but the Controller S was better than the DualShock 2). The Xbox 360 controller is perfect.

Chozo GhostJanuary 27, 2010

Actually, with Tetris you could probably adapt it to motion controls and basically control the falling blocks by tilting and turnign the wii-mote.

Ian SaneJanuary 28, 2010

Quote:

Actually, with Tetris you could probably adapt it to motion controls and basically control the falling blocks by tilting and turnign the wii-mote.


You could... and then you'd lose in record time.  That just sounds like a total recipe for remote throwing rage.

EasyCureJanuary 28, 2010

Great news, now I just have to decide if I give in and mix n match my wiimotes/CC's with black and white or not. I'll probably end up getting the MHT bundle, because I'll probably find it so comfortable that i'll go out and buy a second CCP, and give my OCC to a cousin who recently got a wii.

Quote from: Chozo

Actually, with Tetris you could probably adapt it to motion controls and basically control the falling blocks by tilting and turnign the wii-mote.

Tetris on the iPhone has an entirely touch-based (obviously) method of control using quick swipes to move and rotate the piece that works surprisingly well.

Mop it upJanuary 28, 2010

Quote from: TJ

The Xbox 360 controller is perfect.

Entirely subjective. It's a good controller but I still prefer the GameCube controller. For sheer comfort though, I find the Wiimote + Nunchuk to be the best, largely because of its disconnected design.

ZapJanuary 28, 2010

That makes no sense

BlackNMild2k1January 28, 2010

Quote from: Mop_it_up

Quote from: TJ

The Xbox 360 controller is perfect.

Entirely subjective. It's a good controller but I still prefer the GameCube controller. For sheer comfort though, I find the Wiimote + Nunchuk to be the best, largely because of its independent design.

there is that better?

Mop it upJanuary 28, 2010

That probably does work better. I was trying to think of a word to describe it but nothing was coming to me.

ZapJanuary 28, 2010

It's more comfortable because it's different?

Mop it upJanuary 28, 2010

Because I can rest my hands anywhere, they are not required to be held so close to one another.

ZapJanuary 28, 2010

OIC

NinGurl69 *hugglesJanuary 28, 2010

That said, Tales of Symphonia 2 was the most comfortable RPG I've ever played.

HANDS.  ANYWHERE.

Quote from: Mop_it_up

Quote from: TJ

The Xbox 360 controller is perfect.

Entirely subjective. It's a good controller but I still prefer the GameCube controller. For sheer comfort though, I find the Wiimote + Nunchuk to be the best, largely because of its disconnected design.

I agree about the Wiimote and nunchuk; I wish I had a 360 controller with each hand being separate like that.

Chozo GhostJanuary 28, 2010

The wiimote-chuck combo also makes things better for those who are left-handed, because you can swap the mote and chuck to either hand it will work just as well in one as in the other. Standard controllers are designed for the right handed, and there's no way to break them apart and shift things around.

Like Mop It Up said, the "disconnected" design is great. Whether you're left-handed, or just because you want to set either or both hands on an arm rest. That controller lets you do it, but standard controllers do not.

Chozo GhostJanuary 28, 2010

I also think that the wii-mote is probably the onlly controller in existence that can be played in one hand. I'm sure that works great for people who only have one hand that they can use.

Granted, one handed control will NOT work for games that require the nunchuck, but in every game that uses just the wiimote (minus the ones that force you to play it like an NES controller), you can use it with just one hand. So if I was wounded over in Iraq or something and lost my hand for whatever reason, I can be confident I can still play my Wii (to some extent). I wouldn't be able do that with any other console.

And who here has ever tried playing a game with a friend where one of you controls the wiimote and the other controls the nunchuck? That can lead to some interesting and possibly hilarious results. That's a good thing to play around with, and its only possible because as Mop It Up said, the wiimote/chuck is "Disconnected".

MaxiJanuary 28, 2010

I played Trauma Center:Second Opinion with me using the Wiimote and a friend using the Nunchuck. Pretty fun and challenging.

KDR_11kJanuary 28, 2010

Quote from: Chozo

I HATE HATE HATE the classic controller, which is a clone of the sucky PS2 controller setup. The analog stick should always be given top consideration. The D-PAD MUST ALWAYS BE SECONDARY.

I disagree. The PS2 pad is a SNES pad with a sticks taped on and the CC has the same reason for existing: It's meant primarily for SNES games with analog sticks taped on for modern game compatibility.

The reason I got the CCPro was because when I used the a-sticks on the regular CC I noticed that I had trouble providing the counterforce without handles.

NinGurl69 *hugglesJanuary 28, 2010

"The reason I got the CCPro was because when I used the a-sticks on the regular CC I noticed that I had trouble providing the counterforce without handles."

This is key.  However, I question whether a cheap plastic shell would've sufficed instead of buying an additional controller.

KDR_11kJanuary 28, 2010

Well, now I can play Contra 3 with two people in addition to having handles for 3D games.

Chozo GhostJanuary 28, 2010

NinGurl is right. You can grab cheap plastic shells for your CC to give it handles.

As I understand it, the CC Pro eliminates the shoulder buttons. That will make it a problem for certain games, particularly SNES games.

Quote from: Chozo

NinGurl is right. You can grab cheap plastic shells for your CC to give it handles.

As I understand it, the CC Pro eliminates the shoulder buttons. That will make it a problem for certain games, particularly SNES games.

I have three Classic Controllers: one plain, one with a plastic shell, and a Pro. The Pro is significantly better than the one in the shell. Also, the Pro only eliminates the analog functionality of the shoulder buttons, not the buttons themselves, and rearranges them so the ZL and ZR buttons are in a position where they are not impossible to use comfortably.

BlackNMild2k1January 28, 2010

Quote from: Chozo

NinGurl is right. You can grab cheap plastic shells for your CC to give it handles.

As I understand it, the CC Pro eliminates the shoulder buttons. That will make it a problem for certain games, particularly SNES games.

It doesn't eliminate the shoulder buttons, it gets rid of the analog in the shoulder button, but all the same buttons are still present.

Mop it upJanuary 29, 2010

Quote from: Chozo

The wiimote-chuck combo also makes things better for those who are left-handed, because you can swap the mote and chuck to either hand it will work just as well in one as in the other.

This is very true. For games which primarily use the pointer, I like to hold the Wiimote in my left hand and the Nunchuk in my right. For games that use motions, I like to hold the Wiimote in my right hand and the Nunchuk in my left.

Quote from: Chozo

I also think that the wii-mote is probably the onlly controller in existence that can be played in one hand.

Which leaves the other hand free to hold a drink.

KDR_11kJanuary 29, 2010

What about mouse-only games?

Ian SaneJanuary 29, 2010

Quote:

For sheer comfort though, I find the Wiimote + Nunchuk to be the best, largely because of its disconnected design.


I prefer the firmness of a one-piece controller myself.  It might just be because I'm used to it.  It reminds me of a steering wheel.  I just feel like I've got this thing in my grip and I'm in control.

Chozo GhostJanuary 29, 2010

Nintendo should create a plastic shell which "fuses" the wii and nunchuck together, and also adds in another analog stick. Then this could become the "classic controller".

If you have this plastic shell and then put your wiimote and chuck into it then you can create your own classic controller.

StratosJanuary 29, 2010

Didn't everyone come up with a theoretical controller that could lock together and separate depending on need many years ago? I seem to recall it being based off of a vague patent Nintendo got back even before the Revolution was referred to as the Revolution. I'm also guessing that patent became what is now the Nunchuck and WiiMote.

ShyGuyJanuary 29, 2010

A nunchuck splitter cable so you have a two nunchucks, one on each side with the wiimote held in the middle pointing forward for IR.

Chozo GhostJanuary 29, 2010

Add a few more buttons to the nunchuck and bluetooth capability and you don't even need the wiimote at all. Link two nunchucks together and you have the most kickass controller ever conceived.

Hell, I wouldn't mind even seeing games that you could play with just one wiimote. I would love to try out super mario bros or something like that this way.

Mop it upJanuary 30, 2010

Quote from: KDR_11k

What about mouse-only games?

I don't play PC games, but I have the mouse set up as left-handed. I can switch to the right-handed setup without a problem though.

EasyCureJanuary 30, 2010

Quote from: Chozo

I also think that the wii-mote is probably the onlly controller in existence that can be played in one hand. I'm sure that works great for people who only have one hand that they can use.

That could be done with older controllers if designed properly. EarthBound for SNES could be played entirely with just your left hand. Obviously if you were missing your left hand you'd be screwed, but its still a neat little part of the game. There's nothing in the game that you can't due just using the d-pad, L and select buttons. Except maybe ring the bell on the bike lol.

Quote from: Maxi

I played Trauma Center:Second Opinion with me using the Wiimote and a friend using the Nunchuck. Pretty fun and challenging.

Ha! Thats wimpy in-the-manual stuff. When I worked at the NWS me and this one guy, John, would spice up the Twilight Princess demo we had set up by playing it co-op whenever we weren't trying to beat eacthother in a mini-speed run (they had 3 tv's set up with TP). Its a weird experience having someone else control your sword and items while you move/evade for them and vice versa.

Quote from: Mop_it_up

Quote from: Chozo

I also think that the wii-mote is probably the onlly controller in existence that can be played in one hand.

Which leaves the other hand free to hold a drink.

Now THATS my kinda women! :P

SheckyApril 14, 2010

Quote from: Chozo

I also think that the wii-mote is probably the onlly controller in existence that can be played in one hand.

For the record, you can play Wave Race 64 one handed with the N64 controller.  I know several people who have an extra liking to this game simply due to this fact.  You can sit down and relax with your arms at your side and still play.

StratosApril 14, 2010

Quote from: Shecky

Quote from: Chozo

I also think that the wii-mote is probably the onlly controller in existence that can be played in one hand.

For the record, you can play Wave Race 64 one handed with the N64 controller.  I know several people who have an extra liking to this game simply due to this fact.  You can sit down and relax with your arms at your side and still play.

It's one of my favorite things about Podracer on the N64. Well...similar. There is a code to use two controllers at once and the controls for that rock.

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