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Square-Enix Announces E3 Line Up

by Daniel Bloodworth - May 4, 2004, 8:55 pm PDT
Total comments: 27 Source: Square-Enix Press Release

Well, so far it looks like all we get is Kingdom Hearts for GBA.

SQUARE ENIX U.S.A., INC. TO UNVEIL MULTI-FACETED LINE-UP AT THE ELECTRONIC ENTERTAINMENT EXPO, MAY 12 – 14

New Titles Highlight Company’s Objective of Versatile and Portable Entertainment in All Categories

LOS ANGELES, Calif., (May 3, 2004) - Square Enix U.S.A., Inc. (“Square Enix U.S.A.”), publisher of Square Enix™ interactive products in North America, today announced its Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) line-up of new video game releases for multiple gaming platforms as well as other forms of entertainment. All of the titles will be on display at the Square Enix U.S.A. booth (#624) in the South Hall of the Los Angeles Convention Center.

“The products we are showcasing at this year’s E3 will exemplify some new and interesting directions for SQUARE ENIX,” said Jun Iwasaki, president and C.E.O. of Square Enix U.S.A. “A variety of games will be available for demos, and we’re very excited about some surprises we have in our line-up. Not only are we exploring different types of RPGs, we’re also looking to build upon some of our original content, our most popular franchises, and applying them into other forms of media. The future of entertainment will encompass more than presenting content in a singular format such as in a movie, videogame or comic book; the new entertainment experience will cross platforms and media.”

Console Games

FRONT MISSION® 4

FRONT MISSION 4 marks the debut of the popular mech-based strategy game series on the PlayStation®2 computer entertainment system. Utilizing the technological capabilities of the system, FRONT MISSION 4 brings you the newest chapter in the best-selling series. While boasting an enhanced battle system, outstanding new graphics and dramatic voiceovers, FRONT MISSION 4 maintains the strategic gameplay that has won acclaim from both gamers and press worldwide. As in the previous games, players can fully customize their wanzers, or mech units, with a variety of powerful weaponry and parts. In addition, new tactical features such as the “Link System” bring a new dimension of strategy to the game.

Set in 2096, FRONT MISSION 4 opens as an unidentified group of wanzers assaults and destroys an E.C. German base. The player’s point of view switches between two main characters that find themselves trapped within a dangerous global conspiracy. Elsa, a new recruit in the E.C.'s Durandal corps, is sent to Germany with her team to investigate the attack. The story then shifts to Darril, a U.C.S. Army sergeant in South America. He and his company are sent to Venezuela after its governor declares independence from the U.C.S. Though Darril's squad seems far more interested in slacking off than fighting a war, their plans for early retirement are put on hold after they witness a fateful plane crash in the jungle.

FRONT MISSION 4 will be released June 15, 2004. This title is rated “T” for Teen. More information about FRONT MISSION 4 can be found on the official game site at www.square-enix-usa.com/games/fm4/.

STAR OCEAN™ Till the End of Time™

The first PlayStation 2 installment in the acclaimed science fiction RPG series, the Director’s Cut version is considered to be the culmination of the developer’s true vision. STAR OCEAN was originally released with two versions in Japan. The development time was extended for the North American release in order to incorporate the extra features of the Director’s Cut, the only stateside release of the title. STAR OCEAN builds on the first-rate concepts of earlier games in the series and leverages the technological capabilities of the PlayStation 2 to surpass them. In addition, the larger data capacity of the Director’s Cut allows for multiple added extras providing the most complete game package possible. Incorporating the new features with gorgeous, extended cinematic sequences and an unparalleled real-time battle system, including a new VS. mode, STAR OCEAN is sure to attract a new group of admirers and thrill the longtime fans of the series.

STAR OCEAN’s protagonist, Fayt Leingod brings his family and childhood friend, Sophia Esteed to the Federation-managed resort planet Hyda for a long-deserved vacation. Their dreamy holiday turns into a nightmare when Hyda is attacked by an unknown space military. In the heat of the attack, Fayt is separated from Sophia and his family and begins an emotional quest into the unknown to find his loved ones.

STAR OCEAN will be released August 2004. This title is rated “T” for Teen.

FULLMETAL ALCHEMIST™ and the Broken Angel

Square Enix U.S.A. is proud to bring the action-adventure RPG Fullmetal Alchemist to the PlayStation 2 in Spring 2005. Developed by Racjin, Fullmetal Alchemist is the story of two brothers, trained in the ways of alchemy, who find themselves on the adventure of their lives as they seek the mysterious Philosopher’s Stone.

The story begins as Edward and Alphonse Elric hop a train to the capital city of Central. But an impromptu hijacking forces them into an all-out brawl against a rebel military faction. Fortunately, Edward has more than a few tricks up his sleeve with a variety of alchemy skills; he can transmute everyday objects into powerful weapons. After the hijackers are defeated, a shocking new twist is revealed, sending the brothers’ path askew and leading them to their wildest quest yet...

Fullmetal Alchemist is scheduled for release in Spring 2005 and will carry an ESRB rating of “T” for Teen.

FINAL FANTASY® XII

Our story takes place in a world called “Ivalice,” in an age when magic was commonplace and airships plied the skies – the Archadian Empire, seeking to strengthen its base of power, had been invading and subjugating its neighboring lands one by one—a fate which befell the small Kingdom of Dalmasca. Archadia’s invasion and the subsequent death of the Dalmascan king prompted the Princess Ashe, the sole surviving heir to the Dalmascan throne, to take up arms against the invaders.

In her struggle to oust the occupying Archadian forces and restore freedom to her people, Ashe must watch as many of her allies pay the blood price for that freedom. Though tempted to abandon all hope in the face of the Empire’s might, her determination keeps her from succumbing before what would seem to be inevitable defeat. Then she meets Vaan, an urchin from the Dalmascan capital of Rabanastre. Vaan dreams of one day becoming a sky pirate, escaping the Empire on his airship. Vaan, Ashe, Vaan’s friend Penelo, the sky pirate Balthier, his partner Fran and many more are on an adventure through Ivalice that traces the mysteries behind the Archadian Empire’s invasion.

Bringing with it a wide array of new gameplay elements, FINAL FANTASY XII will change the way players think about the FINAL FANTASY series. Numerous possibilities abound within each scenario, allowing for a less linear, more unique experience for each player. The game also supports Dolby Pro Logic II both in-game and during movie sequences, immersing the player in the middle of the action. True to the series’ tradition of progress and change, FINAL FANTASY XII will move the role-playing genre forward and establish itself as another landmark title for SQUARE ENIX.

FINAL FANTASY XII is scheduled for release in North America in 2005. This title has not yet been rated by the ESRB.

KINGDOM HEARTS® II

It has been a year since the events of KINGDOM HEARTS. Sora and friends are joined by a vibrant new cast of characters, including the king himself. Together, they will face countless dangers in worlds both familiar and brand-new. It seems the Heartless still exist. A new villain also awaits – but is it an old foe behind the mask, or a new menace? This mystery and others will be solved as the story unfolds in a grand adventure. KINGDOM HEARTS has sold over 4 million units worldwide and continues to gain popularity with fans of both DISNEY and SQUARE ENIX across the planet.

KINGDOM HEARTS captured the imagination of gamers young and old by combining classic DISNEY properties and implementing new characters and worlds with SQUARE ENIX’s renowned style. The tale is brought to life by an all-star voice cast. Fans will revisit this beloved story and come to care for a new troupe of characters in KINGDOM HEARTS II.

The release date for KINGDOM HEARTS II will be announced at a later date. This title has yet to be rated by the ESRB.

Handheld

For Game Boy® Advance

KINGDOM HEARTS® CHAIN OF MEMORIES

KINGDOM HEARTS CHAIN OF MEMORIES for the Game Boy Advance bridges the gap between KINGDOM HEARTS and KINGDOM HEARTS II, continuing Sora’s tale where the original left off. One night, after traversing endless grassy fields, Sora comes to a crossroads. His mind swims as he recalls his lost friends. They were supposed to return home at journey’s end…but this was not to be. A man emerges from the shadows and speaks to Sora: “Ahead lies what you seek…but to claim it you must lose something dear.” When the man vanishes, only a single path remains. At the end of that path lies a castle, and inside that castle stretches a vast nothingness. Sora’s memories lay fragmented before him, swirling and spiraling upwards to a great adventure. What will Sora gain, and what will he lose?

By implementing elements never before seen on the Game Boy Advance, KINGDOM HEARTS CHAIN OF MEMORIES promises to deliver an unsurpassed gaming experience to players. New features include high-quality movie event sequences and a card-based battle system. As the latest collaboration between DISNEY and SQUARE ENIX, KINGDOM HEARTS CHAIN OF MEMORIES for the Game Boy Advance will continue to expand the series’ fan base and appeal to gamers of all types.

KINGDOM HEARTS CHAIN OF MEMORIES is scheduled for release Fall 2004. This title has yet to be rated by the ESRB.

Online

FINAL FANTASY® XI Chains of Promathia™ (Expansion Pack)

New areas such as Movalpolos and the Tavnazian Archipelago will be available through the expansion titled “Chains of Promathia.” This expansion pack continues the adventure in award-winning FINAL FANTASY XI, the first cross-platform, cross-continent MMORPG. The first online title in the world-renowned series has quickly become one of most popular MMORPG to date, boasting a community of 500,000 players and 1.2 million active characters from Japan and North America combined.

The subterranean city of Movalpolos was dug and built by a tribe of Goblins referred to as the Moblins. Due to the nomadic nature of most Goblins, it is extremely rare for any of these beastmen to reside together in one place, making this community extremely unique.

The Tavnazian Archipelago is made up of tiny islands off the west coast of Quon, once home to the proud nation of Tavnazia. The remnants of the beastmen army remain in control of the archipelago, and until now, it was thought that none of the former inhabitants had survived.

FINAL FANTASY XI Chains of Promathia is scheduled for release Fall 2004. This expansion has yet to be rated by the ESRB.

Other Entertainment

FINAL FANTASY® VII ADVENT CHILDREN™

Two years after the events of FINAL FANTASY VII, the ruins of Midgar stand as testament to the sacrifices that were made in order to bring peace. However, the world will soon face a new menace. A mysterious illness is spreading fast. Old enemies are astir. And Cloud, who walked away from the life of a hero to live in solitude, must step forward yet again...

FINAL FANTASY VII ADVENT CHILDREN is a fully developed, CG-work sequel to FINAL FANTASY VII, the seminal 1997 PlayStation hit. Through approximately 60 minutes of beautifully crafted DVD content, FINAL FANTASY VII ADVENT CHILDREN revisits the rich universe and memorable characters of FINAL FANTASY VII two years after its dramatic conclusion. Technological advancements bring a visually stunning new look to the city of Midgar and its residents.

FINAL FANTASY VII, originally released in Japan for the PlayStation console on January 31, 1997 (September 7, 1997 in North America), redefined the standard for role-playing games (RPGs) and has since achieved record-shattering sales of over 9 million units worldwide. Fans have long requested a true sequel, and with FINAL FANTASY VII ADVENT CHILDREN, their wishes are granted.

The release date for FINAL FANTASY VII ADVENT CHILDREN will be announced at a later date.

Mobile Entertainment Content

SQUARE ENIX MOBILE brings the same level of technological and visual excellence that gamers have come to expect from SQUARE ENIX products to handsets and other mobile platforms. SQUARE ENIX hopes to shape the future of mobile entertainment as the company addresses a growing and international wireless audience in Japan, the United States, Europe, China and Taiwan.

SQUARE ENIX’s mobile phone content has already enjoyed widespread popularity in Japan. Released in March 2004 in Japan, FINAL FANTASY® and DRAGON QUEST for NTT DoCoMo’s new 3G phones (the 900i series) will be available for demonstration at the SQUARE ENIX booth. These titles are heavily featured in the 900i marketing campaign and come preinstalled on some handsets. Other mobile content available for demonstration include a 3D modeling sample of Cloud (main character, FINAL FANTASY VII), SQUARE ENIX Gallery (a collection of downloadable wallpapers available through AT&T Wireless’ mMode™ service) and Brave Shot™, a fast-paced shooting game available through the Verizon Wireless Get it NowSM service.

Visitors at the SQUARE ENIX booth will be in for a surprise to see the latest development from SQUARE ENIX MOBILE: BEFORE CRISIS – FINAL FANTASY VII. The trailer will be premiering at E3, providing an exclusive look at a game that could possibly take mobile entertainment to a whole new level.

THQ's E3 Line Up

THQ's shown up at the party with their E3 offerings!

THQ Unveils Blockbuster Lineup at 2004 Electronic Entertainment Expo

From Hollywood's Hot Holiday Releases to New Original Console and PC Content, THQ Showcases Videogames Targeting All Segments of the Expanding Gaming Audience

CALABASAS HILLS, Calif. - May 4, 2004 - THQ Inc. (Nasdaq:THQI), the #2 independent videogame publisher, today announced plans to debut several of its highly anticipated console, PC and handheld releases at next week's Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) in Los Angeles. Console gamer content including Destroy All Humans(TM), The Punisher(TM), WWE(TM) Day of Reckoning(TM) and Full Spectrum Warrior(TM) will be available for demonstration along with brand new PC titles S.T.A.L.K.E.R.: Shadow of Chernobyl and Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War. THQ will also present the most expansive mass-market product portfolio in the industry, including games based on "The Incredibles," "The Polar Express," and "The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie," three of the biggest feature films scheduled for holiday 2004. These titles and others will be available for hands-on demonstrations in the THQ booth, #1024, in the South Hall of the Los Angeles Convention Center May 12-14.

"Our 2004 portfolio caters to every segment of the game playing audience," said Brian Farrell, president and CEO, THQ. "Games like S.T.A.L.K.E.R.: Shadow of Chernobyl, Destroy All Humans, Dawn of War and Full Spectrum Warrior are already winning critical praise and gaining traction at retail. Additionally, we have an expansive portfolio of games based on premiere mass-market brands including 'The Punisher' along with highly anticipated holiday feature film releases, such as 'The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie,' 'The Incredibles,' and 'The Polar Express.' In addition, THQ Wireless is also unveiling sports applications for wireless devices at the show."

THQ's E3 Lineup includes games in every genre, including:

>From the Silver Screen:

The Incredibles - Following the success of the Finding Nemo videogame, which shipped more than five million units worldwide, The Incredibles is the second offering in THQ's three property deal with Disney and Pixar. The Incredibles tells the story of a family of undercover superheroes that are trying to live a quiet, suburban life, but are forced back into action in order to save the world. The game is expected to launch simultaneously with the film, which will hit theaters on November 5, 2004. The Incredibles videogame will bring action and adventure to the PlayStation®2, Xbox(TM), GameCube(TM), PC/Mac, and Game Boy® Advance systems this fall.

The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie - Based on the highly anticipated November 2004 release of "The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie," this action platform game is being developed by Heavy Iron Studios, creators of the critically acclaimed SpongeBob SquarePants: Battle for Bikini Bottom, released in October 2003. The SpongeBob character continues to hold the #1 Q-score rating for kids aged 6-14 and is the most watched animated show in TV history by kids. The franchise also has all-ages appeal, with 30% of viewers between ages 18-49. Scheduled for PlayStation 2, Xbox, GameCube, Game Boy Advance and PC this fall.

The Polar Express(TM) - Based on the tent-pole holiday release from Warner Bros. Pictures, The Polar Express, directed by Robert Zemeckis and starring Tom Hanks, brings the magic of Christmas to life in beautiful CG animation. The game is being developed by THQ's Australian studio and will ship for PlayStation 2, GameCube, Game Boy Advance and PC in conjunction with the film release this holiday season.

For the Hard Core PC Gamer:

S.T.A.L.K.E.R. Shadow of Chernobyl - Boasting some of the richest graphics ever delivered on a PC, S.T.A.L.K.E.R.: Shadow of Chernobyl brings to life the actual Chernobyl terrain in the year 2012 - six years after a mysterious second explosion rocks the landscape. As a "stalker" exploring the vast "Exclusion Zone" to procure artifacts for the black market, players must survive mutant creatures, dangerous anomalous areas, competing "stalkers" and a military charged with quarantining the 30 square kilometer area. Developed by GSC Game World and powered by the all-new X-ray engine, S.T.A.L.K.E.R.: Shadow of Chernobyl is scheduled for release on the PC this fall.

Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War - From "Game of the Year" developer Relic Entertainment, Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War takes strategy gaming to new cinematic, visceral heights. Set in a universe ruled by brutal warfare, four ancient enemy races collide with a single objective - annihilation of all others. Named to PC Gamer's "Top 10 Games of 2004" list and garnering PC Gamer's April issue cover feature, Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War is scheduled for release on the PC this fall.

Core Titles:

Full Spectrum Warrior - Based on a training tool developed for the U.S. Army to reinforce training at the Infantry level, Full Spectrum Warrior is the most realistic portrayal of urban warfare via true squad-based gameplay. After garnering many critical accolades including Best of E3, magazine covers such as OXM, a perfect score from Maxim, as well as Playboy's June Game of the Month, the much-anticipated Full Spectrum Warrior is scheduled for release on the XboxTM in early June and on PC this fall.

The Punisher - Developed by THQ's Volition studio, The Punisher is based on the ever-popular Marvel comic book series. The game is built for players to enter the mind of the Punisher. More than just shooting, it will be important for players to walk into a room and think 'What would The Punisher do?' Features like character interrogations and highly interactive environments add a layer of depth that truly set this game apart. The Punisher is scheduled for release on PS2 and Xbox in early 2005.

WWE Day of Reckoning - Developed by Yukes, WWE Day of Reckoning features the WWE's top Superstars including, Kurt Angle®, Chris Benoit® and Triple H®. Players will transform a rookie's dream into a Superstar's reality as they fight their way to the top of WWE programming in an all-new story mode filled with deception and betrayal. WWE Day of Reckoning from THQ and JAKKS Pacific is scheduled for release on the GameCube this fall.

Destroy All Humans! - Developed by Pandemic Studios, creators of Full Spectrum Warrior, Destroy All Humans! turns players' conventional expectations of playing the human defending against an alien invasion to now allow them to play the alien hell bent on infiltrating and taking over all of humanity. Destroy All Humans! delivers an open ended world where the player can rain down destruction from his UFO or land at any point to walk among the humans as the 3rd person alien subverting and terrorizing all of humanity. Packed with humorous science-fiction mythology and tons of conspiracy theory. Players will soon discover that it is better to be the superior being. Scheduled for release on the PlayStation2 and Xbox in early 2005.

THQ will also showcase Tak 2: The Staff of Dreams, the next installment in THQ and Nickelodeon's million-unit selling original Tak franchise. Additionally, THQ and Nickelodeon will unveil their first game for the PlayStation 2 Eyetoy(TM), Nicktoons (working title), in which popular Nickelodeon characters interact in multiple Nickelodeon cartoon environments.

THQ Wireless will demonstrate several new games on the latest mobile devices, including Olympics 2004, Midway, NFL, NHL and a baseball title. For more information on THQ's 2004 E3 lineup, visit www.thq.com.

Talkback

MelanicMay 04, 2004

Well, FFXII and Kingdom Hearts doesn't mention any particular console.

Plus, FFXII does support Dolby Pro Logic 2, so it seems possible to have a GC release.

I like grasping at straws....

Ian SaneMay 04, 2004

Well I guess there's still a possibility of a surprise Cube game. Um... yeah that sounds realistic.

If Square Enix doesn't release at least one more game for the Cube they totally played Nintendo like a fiddle. What bugs me is their Cube interest seemed to be reasonably strong until they merged with Enix AKA "we only support the market leader".

DeguelloJeff Shirley, Staff AlumnusMay 04, 2004

>>Enix AKA "we only support the market leader".<<

It will be interesting to see how that speil stands up when the PSP is released. The current market leader for handhelds is the GBA. It will definately be the market leader when the PSP releases and for a long time after that. Will they hold to this line of reasoning then?

JonLeungMay 05, 2004

As overrated as Square games are (yes, Final Fantasy VII was a good game, can we get over that already?!?) I do usually enjoy them. There are a lot of morons out there who think it's impossible to be a Final Fantasy fan as well as a Nintendo fan. I played the first six (yes, even the Japanese ones), rented VII with a PSX, though I eventually got it on the PC as well as VIII, and when the PS2 came out there was no shortage of now-obsolete PSXes (since PS2s are backwards-compatible) to borrow to play IX on. Never had to own a Sony console for most of that series. With XI on the PC, the only "main" series FFs I'm missing out on are X and X-2 (which is pronounced ten-too, not ecks-too, morons), but my FF record is still better than those who came to the series at VII and think they're all that. What annoys me is when they refuse to play the past games because they can't stand the graphics. Some fans they are.

I heard a rumour that FFXII might come to the GCN, but then again it's just a rumour. Anybody could've said that. Planet GameCube even has FFXI (the online one which shouldn't have been called XI IMO) listed as rumoured for the GCN - someone should update that as it's an old entry referring to Yamauchi. But what I heard which was also interesting (though also a rumour) was a FF game on the 'Cube more in the traditional vein than Crystal Chronicles.

Anyway, it's just one franchise, even if it's their main one... Even if I usually like FF games I won't consider it a tremendous loss if they continue to put all their games on Sony's consoles here on out. Or I could just get a PS2, but then I'd probably just wait for the PStwo or the PS3...or borrow a PS2 when the PS3s come out, I only really need to play a handful of PS2 games since several are also on the PC.

Still, Kingdom Hearts for the GBA could be cool...the original would be something I'd consider playing if I got my hands on a PS2. Disney and Square-Enix. Weird crossover. Yet from what I've seen, it somehow meshes well.

BloodworthDaniel Bloodworth, Staff AlumnusMay 05, 2004

Hey, tossing in insults at every point of your conversation is rather lame.

Ian SaneMay 05, 2004

"yes, Final Fantasy VII was a good game, can we get over that already?!?"

It's not just a good game it's the best rgp EVER. face-icon-small-smile.gif

"It will be interesting to see how that speil stands up when the PSP is released. The current market leader for handhelds is the GBA. It will definately be the market leader when the PSP releases and for a long time after that. Will they hold to this line of reasoning then?"

It's hard to say. Square is very progressive and decides quite early which system to throw their support on. Enix however plays it safe to a ridiculous level. I think it may depend on which hardware will better allow them to make the games they want to make. Knowing Square they'll want to pick the PSP because of the optical disc format. If however they decide to focus on the DS I want Nintendo to play hardball again. No DS license without some N5 support and this time they should set up a deal to get at least three exclusives.

What I find funny is that Enix's support decides who wins the console wars in Japan yet they're too stupid to realize this and take a wait-and-see approach. The Xbox would be number one in Japan with exclusive Enix support.

couchmonkeyMay 05, 2004

I'm pretty excited about Kingdom Hearts as I'm not all that interested in the other games Square Enix has brought to the GBA so far, but it is definitely disappointing that there's nothing for the GameCube. I'm cautiously optimistic that they simply aren't ready to show the next GameCube title yet, since FF:CC is only a few months old and Square Enix isn't putting many of its resources into the GameCube.

I'm surprised Square Enix isn't more interested in doing ports. They recently re-released Dragon Quest 5 on the PS2, and it was the number one game in Japan for at least one week. If they can sell so many copies of a port of a Super NES game, it should make a lot of sense to do a few cheap ports to the Cube. YOU'RE SITTING ON A GOLDMINE, TREBEK!

joeamisMay 05, 2004

Quote

Originally posted by: Deguello
>>Enix AKA "we only support the market leader".<<

It will be interesting to see how that speil stands up when the PSP is released. The current market leader for handhelds is the GBA. It will definately be the market leader when the PSP releases and for a long time after that. Will they hold to this line of reasoning then?


I wouldn't say the GBA will continue to be the market leader for a long time after the PSP. Theres a small possibility the DS might but I see the PSP taking over the handheld market like the PS's did the console market. Why?
#1.Because already the major third parties are saying they prefer the PSP.
#2.Look at the top ten selling lists for GBA of any month and it's always proliferated with 1st party games.
#3.Because of #2 third parties are going to see that a same title released on DS or GBA and PSP is going to sell better on PSP (Because of reason #2). (unless the GBA manages to compete because of it's large userbase, with the PSP somehow with the same title released on both (which will clearly be alot better on PSP in graphics, sound, and probably control) therefor making the PSP version alot more appealing. Or the DS could possibly be compete but it would be unlikely because of reason #2 applied to the DS.

Also wheres the originality with FF VII? the Archadian Empire (hmm wonder where that came from, maybe um Arcadia?) Dalmasca (hmm maybe Damascus?) Vann (van...)
Ashe (ash...) Could they be any more creative?

xanrastafariMay 05, 2004

Well your theory works except the reason none of the 3rd party GBA games sell well is the vast vast majority of them are crap!

Also: Creative names are completely unimportant. Sure you could call the main character zazafadaga, but that really wouldn't make the game any better.

Ian SaneMay 05, 2004

"Because already the major third parties are saying they prefer the PSP."

Actually I've read the exact opposite. EA seems to be the only third party thus far to be more interested in the PSP.

"Look at the top ten selling lists for GBA of any month and it's always proliferated with 1st party games."

That doesn't mean anything. If you looked at old SNES top ten lists you would probably have seen the same trend. First party games sell best but that doesn't mean that third party games don' t sell well. I've never heard of a third party abandoning the GBA because of low game sales. Virtually everything sells well on the GBA.

This isn't the same scenario on the Cube because it has a smaller userbase so less games are going to be big hits.

Bill AurionMay 05, 2004

Quote

Originally posted by: Ian Sane
"Because already the major third parties are saying they prefer the PSP."

Actually I've read the exact opposite. EA seems to be the only third party thus far to be more interested in the PSP.

I've been seeing the same...And investors think so too...

mouse_clickerMay 05, 2004

So all this........ and the only Nintendo related bit is about Kingdom Hearts for the GBA. Exciting..............

JonLeungMay 05, 2004

Quote

Originally posted by: Ian Sane
"yes, Final Fantasy VII was a good game, can we get over that already?!?"

It's not just a good game it's the best rgp EVER. face-icon-small-smile.gif


It may or may not be, but I find it annoying because it seems like every new FF RPG that comes out, it brings FFVII back into the top ten list at GameFAQs.

It's like if there's someone you know who's perfect, you wouldn't mind their presence, but you definitely would mind if they wouldn't shut up about it. I stand by my statement...FFVII is good, fine, even uber-great if you wish, but if I've played it, and you've played it, and I've replayed it, and you've replayed it, then what's the point? Move on to another game!

I played it, and I enjoyed it, but I'd rather play games I haven't played than replay that game multiple times over. You'd think everyone in the world has played it to death by now, yet all we keep hearing is how great FFVII is. I'd bet over half of those people didn't play VI or below. While some people are just shallow, you can't deny that FFVI was, for its time, a pretty damn good game as well. You don't have to think it's better than VII, but you can't write it off because the graphics "burn eyes". I've actually heard that said about 16-bit graphics. A shame.

FF is the source of my love-hate because while many of its games are pretty good, at times it just seems to pander to those who think great graphics are all that. While I may certainly sound like a good game shouldn't have good graphics, which is not the case, the overusage of FMV in the VII-and-above games, and the whole dress-up concept of X-2, makes me wonder if they're giving in to what's simpler - graphics instead of gameplay.

And whoever it was who thought I was throwing insults around; I'm not a malicious guy and I wasn't referring to anyone specific - I'm sure everyone has cursed groups of people as a whole. I can identify with the FF fans who played a lot of FF games and enjoy their depth and subtleties, but I certainly don't agree with the FF fans who just like the graphics and refuse to play the early games. It's like knowing a sports fan who doesn't know the rules of the sport. What's up with that?

And now, I'm certain, this post has made me sound more of a jerk than I meant.

Ian SaneMay 05, 2004

JonLeung my statement about FF7 was meant as a joke about a certain forum member. Too subtle?

In reality I don't consider FF7 to be that great or bad. It's just sort of a blah game. I haven't really been able to get into any of Square's post-SNES games.

couchmonkeyMay 05, 2004

My impression is that third parties are interested in the PSP because it's powerful and it should be cheaper to develop for than the GBA. Having said that, Nintendo has sold something like 40 million GBAs: the PSP isn't going to overtake it any time soon.

Will Square Enix switch to the PSP? I have a feeling that the company will support both systems for the next couple of years. The GBA has a huge user base which I think can't be ignored, but knowing that Square loves cinematics and has a number of 3D games that can't be ported to the GBA, I think some support for PSP is inevitable.

KyoshoMay 05, 2004

Final Fantasy N? Doubt it.

Full Metal Alchemist is an awesome anime. Looks like I may have to buy a ps2 now instead of holding out till '05-'06 for ps3 sigh

spatoblMay 05, 2004

The PSP, at least at the start will have a pretty hard time competing.

The optical disc based media will put a huge damper on battery life to start. With the features it is supposed to have it will probably not fit no your packet. And giving that Sony has a much less than perfect track record with its hardware breaking, drop it once and it will probably need to be replaced/repaired. I'm not saying it will flop (ala N-Gage) but it will have some hurdles to overcome, plus Nintendo if nothing else, knows handhelds.

joeamisMay 05, 2004

Quote

Originally posted by: Ian Sane
"
"Look at the top ten selling lists for GBA of any month and it's always proliferated with 1st party games."

That doesn't mean anything. If you looked at old SNES top ten lists you would probably have seen the same trend. First party games sell best but that doesn't mean that third party games don' t sell well. I've never heard of a third party abandoning the GBA because of low game sales. Virtually everything sells well on the GBA.

This isn't the same scenario on the Cube because it has a smaller userbase so less games are going to be big hits.


You haven't heard of a third party abandoning the GBA because there's been no direct competition in handhelds for more than a decade (theres not a 2nd option). I'm not saying developers will abandon the GBA, I'm just saying that when and if the PSP gets a decent userbase out you will probably see the same game on GBA or DS be outsold by the PSP version. Referring to my quote above, when Nintendo keeps releasing the best games for their portables AND their is significant direct competition this will become a big factor like it was on GC and even N64 which did have a large userbase.

Also I believe creative names are important for rpgs. RPGs rely on good storytelling, and the names are a big part of that. I don't want to play a fantasy game that has names of it's locations that are basically the same as locations in real life. For example who would be pleased by visiting 'New Yorke City' or 'Los Angelas' in a fantasy rpg? The names of characters are also very important, how effective of a boss would Sephiroth have been if his name was Swordman, Carr (like Vann), Dustt (like Ashe), or Grayhair?

JonLeungMay 05, 2004

Quote

Originally posted by: joeamis
The names of characters are also very important, how effective of a boss would Sephiroth have been if his name was Swordman, Carr (like Vann), Dustt (like Ashe), or Grayhair?


I found this funny. Carr and Dustt. Heh heh. My cousin had a Turbo GrafX-16 when we visited Toronto over a decade ago. We mostly played this...get this...a racing RPG. Final Lap Twin? Oh, I forget, but I could look it up if anyone's interested. The names of the towns in the game were of real cities, just changed around, or with a letter added or removed, like Algary and Oronto or something like that, obvious takes on Canadian cities. What you said about "New Yorke City" reminded me of that.

Wasn't it Evolution Worlds with character names like Gre Nade and Mag Launcher? I never played it; it was yet another GameCube RPG that the Blockbuster near my house didn't pick up. But I recall something like that, as well as the upcoming Tales of Symphonia naming characters like Genius Sage and such. I suppose the names do set the tone of the game...but what were we talking about again?

joeamisMay 05, 2004

I was responding to xanrastafari post regarding RPG names, where he said:
"Also: Creative names are completely unimportant. Sure you could call the main character zazafadaga, but that really wouldn't make the game any better."

For me RPG's are all about fantasy worlds you're encountering for the first time and the story and characters are what make it what it is. Vann and Ashe are okay names, but I think SE could do alot better. And two of the locations stated for the game already are almost copies of real life locations. Seeing four examples of lesser creativity in a description of the game in only 1-2 paragraphs is a bit much, if maybe there was just 1 or 2 I would just neglect it. But basically I'm refuting xanrastafari's comment that names don't make the game any better. So if that's the case then say FF7 would have as much an impact and be as immersive in it's storytelling if Sephiroth was named Swordman, Dustt, Carr, or Grayhair. If I was playing the game and interacting with and seeing cinemas of this nasty guy and his name was Grayhair or Swordman it would change the context, infact it would go from thrilling and deep to just plain laughable.

I remember hearing about Final Lap Twin, and to me that's alright because it's a racing game. Also back when videogame storytelling was in it's early stages it was common for it being less creative.

mouse_clickerMay 05, 2004

Quote

I'm not saying developers will abandon the GBA, I'm just saying that when and if the PSP gets a decent userbase out you will probably see the same game on GBA or DS be outsold by the PSP version.


........why? I'm not following your logic here. You're saying the PSP version of a game will outsell the GBA version, despite the GBA having sold extraordinarily well? That makes about as much sense as saying the Gamecube version of a game will probably outsell the PS2 version.

Ian SaneMay 05, 2004

"when Nintendo keeps releasing the best games for their portables AND their is significant direct competition this will become a big factor like it was on GC and even N64 which did have a large userbase."

Again that was a complete non-issue with the SNES which had a very significant competitor in the Sega Genesis. Yet there was no such problem in that case. As well as DKC and Yoshi's Island sold, third party games still made money. True the GBA doesn't have a competitor but if third parties weren't making significant money on it they just plain wouldn't make portable games. It's not like third parties absolutely need to make GBA games for creative purposes. Aside from Boktai there are no GBA games that couldn't have been made on a home console so if the money wasn't there they wouldn't support it.

Third parties left the N64 because it's hardware prevented them from making the games they wanted to make. They left the Cube because virtually nothing sells that well on it including first party games.

KDR_11kMay 05, 2004

GBA games are really cheap to make. You could use one-man teams to make games for it, with a decently sized team you'd make a game in a few months. They're not multimillion dollar productions like many "realistic" games nowadays.

JonLeung: It seems to be common in Japan to decide on a theme for names. Rock, Roll, Bass, Treble, Blues, the theme for Megaman is music. There's a game "The Violonist of Hameln" (SNES, Enix) where people are named after instruments. Your girl is called Flute, your bird Oboe, monsters have names like F#ggot (apparently they thought f#ggot and fagott mean the same...) or Bassoon. In P.N.03 enemies are named after plants, etc.

joeamisMay 06, 2004

Quote

Originally posted by: Ian Sane
"when Nintendo keeps releasing the best games for their portables AND their is significant direct competition this will become a big factor like it was on GC and even N64 which did have a large userbase."

Again that was a complete non-issue with the SNES which had a very significant competitor in the Sega Genesis. Yet there was no such problem in that case. As well as DKC and Yoshi's Island sold, third party games still made money. True the GBA doesn't have a competitor but if third parties weren't making significant money on it they just plain wouldn't make portable games. It's not like third parties absolutely need to make GBA games for creative purposes. Aside from Boktai there are no GBA games that couldn't have been made on a home console so if the money wasn't there they wouldn't support it.

Third parties left the N64 because it's hardware prevented them from making the games they wanted to make. They left the Cube because virtually nothing sells that well on it including first party games.


All the EA sports games sold better on Genesis despite having better graphics and sound on the SNES, and that was still also Nintendo's prime time in the market with an absolutely huge userbase on the SNES.

I'm not saying 3rd parties aren't making money on GBA, they're raking in tons of cash on GBA. As I stated before I'm not saying developers will abandon the GBA. I'm simply saying that when the PSP has a good sized userbase and the same game is released on GBA or DS and PSP, that the PSP version will in most cases outsell the GBA or DS version. Why despite the GBA marketshare? Because the PSP version will absolutely blow away the GBA version in every component: graphics, sound, and to a lesser extent control (I don't see PSP having less buttons than GBA) AND of course people will be gobbling up the awesome 1st party games for GBA which will take away from the 3rd party sales. Why for compared to the DS? Because the DS and PSP will probably have similar sized userbases (alot of people are going to stick with GBA instead of upgrading to DS right away, especially kids) And the PSP version will outdo the DS version in graphics and sound. Unless the DS dual screen provides greater incentive than the PSP version of the game... (depends on the developer, and you know some developers won't even make good use of it)

JonLeungMay 07, 2004

Quote

Originally posted by: joeamis
Unless the DS dual screen provides greater incentive than the PSP version of the game... (depends on the developer, and you know some developers won't even make good use of it)


Until or unless the DS replaces the GBA, I would think that developers would be better off making the game for the GBA. Last I heard (though I could be wrong) the DS isn't uberly more powerful than the GBA, so games that don't require a second screen so much could just put it on the GBA which will of course have a huge user base already. (Hopefully someone can prove me wrong, about the DS's lack of a leap in power, as I'm hoping the DS is more than a double-screened GBA.) If Nintendo is pretty insistent about the DS being a "third pillar", and if the DS turns out not to be able to backwards-compatibly play GBA games, then the DS might not replace the GBA for at least a little while.

Hopefully all of these developers that are interested in the DS will make at least some use of the dual screens and whatever innovations it might have.

KDR_11kMay 08, 2004

Well, for one thing the DS can do 3d...

oohhboyHong Hang Ho, Staff AlumnusMay 09, 2004

I only ask for one thing from square. Front Mission for GCN. That is the only game that I know from square that hasn't been riding it's own coat tails or spammed.

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