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3DS

Used Game Sales Not the Reason for Mercenaries 3D's Save System

by James Dawson - June 28, 2011, 10:11 pm PDT
Total comments: 15 Source: http://ds.ign.com/articles/117/1179558p1.html, (IGN)

Capcom claims that the game's high replay value makes the save system a non-issue.

The inability to delete saved data in Resident Evil: The Mercenaries 3D is not related to quashing used game sales, Capcom said in a statement today. After finding out that title would not support the ability to reset the game’s save, many assumed that this was exactly their motivation. Today's statement from Capcom sought to belay those concerns.

The exact statement read as follows: "In Resident Evil: The Mercenaries 3D, all mission progress is saved directly to the Nintendo 3DS cartridge, where it cannot be reset. The nature of the game invites high levels of replayability in order to improve mission scores. In addition, this feature does not remove any content available for users.”

Capcom explicitly states that used game sales "were not a factor in this development decision," and then state that it is their hope that "consumers will be able to enjoy the entirety of the survival-action experiences that the game does offer." However, nothing in their statement constitutes a specific explanation for this restriction.

Regardless of the reason, some used game retailers have reacted harshly. GameStop originally decided that they would not accept trade-ins for the title, but reversed this decision after consultation with Capcom. In Australia, GameStop subsidiary EB Games has recalled the game, literally removing it from their shelves. Video game rental service GameFly is currently not renting the title.

Talkback

AdrockJune 28, 2011

Goddammit, Capcom... /facepalm

I guess the most obvious question is, "So?" Mario Kart features high levels of replayability too, but I can still trash my save if I want. I probably wouldn't, but I like knowing that I can. I guess I don't like the idea of having this imposed on me. It's such a silly thing to put in the game and Capcom's PR is doing a terrible job of explaining why this exists and how used games sales somehow weren't a factor.

Lying.... YOU'RE DOING IT WRONG.

ShyGuyJune 28, 2011

Maybe Sony paid Capcom to sabotage the first big 3rd party title for the 3DS.

YmeegodJune 29, 2011

? Since I don't have the game I'm taking a wild guess but you can "restart" the levels right?  So what it only has one save?  The only thing you won't be able to do is rename your main "character" file, reset the scores for the levels, and relock all the unlockables that someone else done.

You can still sell it, play used copies, ect.  Not sure why the big deal.

KITT 10KJune 29, 2011

I agree with Adrock on Mario Kart having the reset option. While I may not use it, it's nice to have the option to. While not putting it in this game was a real stupid move on Capcom's behalf, the game is still worth getting. I have it and like it so far.

StrawHousePigJune 29, 2011

Quote from: ShyGuy

Maybe Sony paid Capcom to sabotage the first big 3rd party title for the 3DS.

Which was Street Fighter IV.

I smell BS coming from Capcom's direction. That's not "replay value" that's, "WTF.... someone already beat this? I can't start over? What a POS!"

CericJune 29, 2011

Has anyone asked Nintendo and other developers whether this is true?  For anti-piracy reasons I could see Nintendo making it impossible to delete from a cart.  You don't want people clearing them and flashing them with another game.  Though the question becomes why didn't you just use a traditional system save?

So we've asked about this, because their reasoning makes no sense. If we don't get a response by today I'll write up a dissection of this.

The statement doesn't give a reason; it's just stating fact. Yes, it can't be reset, because they made it so. It has nothing to do with technical means -- i.e. it's not "write-once" memory because that would mean you could only save once as well.

Quote from: Ceric

Has anyone asked Nintendo and other developers whether this is true?  For anti-piracy reasons I could see Nintendo making it impossible to delete from a cart.  You don't want people clearing them and flashing them with another game.  Though the question becomes why didn't you just use a traditional system save?

ROM used for game code and Flash used for saves are two separate chips. You can't delete ROM.

Even if it were, the 3DS is capable of putting game data on the SD card.

Exactly. That means Capcom actually spent extra money to have 3DS cards manufactured with a Flash chip installed.

KDR_11kJune 29, 2011

So yeah, the question for Capcom would be "then why did you do it?"

Of course we know the answer. After all this is the company that built extra DRM into PSN games.

Quote from: MegaByte

Exactly. That means Capcom actually spent extra money to have 3DS cards manufactured with a Flash chip installed.

I don't think its even that. I'm speculating that the reason data cannot be deleted from the card is the lack of a button to do it.

Lady MushroomJune 29, 2011

With the high price of 3DS games, I NEED to resell one to buy another. Stopping people from reselling their own property is immoral.

I am happy with the derived pseudo explanation that a Capcom-Unity mod posted in their forums. It's designed like an arcade game, and arcade games have permanent high scores and unlocked stuff. Doesn't mean that the 3DS is not a handheld, and treating it like an arcade machine is not a strange decision, but strange decisions happen all the time in game development.

Quote from: NWR_Karlie

I am happy with the derived pseudo explanation that a Capcom-Unity mod posted in their forums. It's designed like an arcade game, and arcade games have permanent high scores and unlocked stuff. Doesn't mean that the 3DS is not a handheld, and treating it like an arcade machine is not a strange decision, but strange decisions happen all the time in game development.

DSi XL is not a handheld.

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