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Learn How to Get in the Game Industry

by Steven Rodriguez - December 11, 2003, 10:12 am PST
Total comments: 11 Source: Press Release

If you're in the San Francisco area, attend a free seminar on how to get your break.

HOW TO BREAK INTO VIDEO GAME INDUSTRY CONFERENCE, RESUME WORKSHOP AND JOB FAIR JANUARY 31, 2004

New San Francisco Event from The Game Initiative, Producers of the Austin Game Conference

AUSTIN, Texas, December 11, 2003 - The Game Initiative today announced a new conference designed for students and professionals eager to get a job in the computer and video game industry. “How To Break Into Video Game Industry: Mini-Conference, Resume Workshop and Job Fair” will take place January 31, 2004 in San Francisco. The event is designed for artists, programmers and designers looking to get into the business. Attendees will have the opportunity to speak with industry insiders, including top recruiter Mary-Margaret.com, hiring managers from local game companies as well as network and meet with industry veterans. Alias, the world's leading innovator of 3D graphics technology, is lead sponsor of the event.

“The comprehensive program will provide an overview of the industry, identify technology trends and requirements as well as the qualifications and skill-sets that are in demand,” said Christopher Sherman, Game Initiative Executive Director. “The casual nature of this event allows attendees an unprecedented opportunity to interact with industry veterans, ask questions, gain valuable contacts and understand the business.”

Students will learn how to build an early professional road map to a career in the game industry. Professionals looking to move into the business from other industries will learn how their experience and transferable skills can gain rapid entry into this industry. The event will also provide a great opportunity for local companies to meet potential new talent.

The cost is $35 in advance or $45 at the door. The event takes place at the 600 Townsend Building located in the South of Market Area at the corner of 7th and Townsend Streets in San Francisco. Registration is available online at http://www.TheGameInitiative.com

How To Break Into Video Game Industry attendees will:

  • Find out what employers are looking for now and in the future

  • Learn how the game development pipeline works

  • Receive an overview of the industry and where it’s headed

  • Understand the core competencies required in art, programming and design

  • Meet and network with professionals in the industry

  • Participate in a resume workshop designed to gain them critical interviews with hiring managers.

“How To Break Into Video Game Industry” is managed by the staff that produced widely acclaimed Austin Game Conference in September and the Austin Game Breakin in November. The Game Initiative – http://www.TheGameInitiative.com - was spun out of the Austin Game Initiative (AGI) to focus on producing leading game industry events worldwide.

About The Game Initiative

The Game Initiative is chartered with the growth of the computer and video game industry by serving the needs of companies involved in producing interactive entertainment software and hardware for video game consoles, handheld devices, personal computers and the Internet. The Game Initiative was spun out of the Austin Game Initiative (AGI), an organization focused on supporting the game development industry in Austin, Texas. Austin is the # 3 location in the U.S. for game development with more than 50 companies making major contributions to the game industry, including game development, publishing, tools and middleware and chips and hardware. The AGI produces The Austin Game Conference which will take place September 9-10, 2004. More information about the Game Initiative can be found at http://www.TheGameInitiative.com.

Talkback

Nik JamDecember 11, 2003

I hope there's no Age Limit. I'll be 17 when that happens.

OO7craftDecember 11, 2003

I always wanted to be in the game industry when I was a kid.... Then once I grew older and realized that programming, graphics design, editors, whatever position you got making the game is not as fun as its made out to be face-icon-small-sad.gif . very hard work, NOthing fun like playing the finished game face-icon-small-smile.gif

KDR_11kDecember 11, 2003

For those who want to know now.
That will answer your questions now, for free and a lot more comprehensive. It's already a year old, but I doubt a lot has changed since then.

I haven't done all aspects of game creation, but so far I found both coding and 3d art to be fun.

PaleMike Gamin, Contributing EditorDecember 11, 2003

Quote

Originally posted by: OO7craft
Then once I grew older and realized that programming, graphics design, editors, whatever position you got making the game is not as fun as its made out to be face-icon-small-sad.gif . very hard work,


Funny thing is, I LOVE doing all that stuff...someday I'll be in that damn industry... face-icon-small-smile.gif Coding is more fun than playing a lot of the time...some of the time it sucks ass, but when you are actually making progress and seeing the results its an awesome experience.

OO7craftDecember 11, 2003

Quote

Funny thing is, I LOVE doing all that stuff...someday I'll be in that damn industry... face-icon-small-smile.gif Coding is more fun than playing a lot of the time...some of the time it sucks ass, but when you are actually making progress and seeing the results its an awesome experience


eek. Good thing we have people like you then to make my games face-icon-small-smile.gif. errr I dont mind so much 3d modeling for Im sorta doing it now to build a halo pc level but programming i cant stand *Shudders*

KnowsNothingDecember 11, 2003

speaking of programming, anybody know of a good online C++ manual guide thing? Or would buying a book be the way to go?

OO7craftDecember 11, 2003

Quote

speaking of programming, anybody know of a good online C++ manual guide thing? Or would buying a book be the way to go?


*shudders again*

I would actually recommend taking a course if u wanna get into it.. Its very hard to learn on your own from a book or the internet.. but if u cant or dont want to take a course then get a book.

PaleMike Gamin, Contributing EditorDecember 11, 2003

I would suggest Practical C Programming, the O'Reilly book with a cow on it. Learn C inside out, then the transition to C++ is a snap.

nolimit19December 11, 2003

im down with 007. i cant stand that programming crap. im sure it would be cool if i were any good at it, but no luck for me. i have lots of good ideas for games, but i cant program or any crap like that.

Koopa TroopaDecember 11, 2003

You should be able to find "The C Programming Language" (by Kernighan and Richie if memory serves) if not it is probably reasonably price if you find it used. (It is a very good book)

If you want to jump into C++, just make sure you find a book that isn't heavy on STL(Standard Template Library) it is the most hideous thing I've ever seen, surpassed only by Microsoft APIs face-icon-small-wink.gif... aside from being hideous, you just won't learn as much if you jump right into STL.

A quick look on HowStuffWorks turned this up...

http://computer.howstuffworks.com/c.htm

And after skimming a bit of it, it looks to be very well written and informative.

RobageejamminDecember 12, 2003

AHHH COOL! Ill have to make my way over to sanfrancisco. I have also dedicated my life to being in the gaming industry. I dunno, i started out with 3dgamestudio and then 3dsmax, but i must say my favorite right now is a 2d game program called "The Games Factory". Its a quaint little program that nobody knows about, yet it is very powerful and user friendly...and user friendly is not a bad thing in this case. Also, instead of scripting, theres a spreadsheet which i think is alot cooler. check it out. I highly recommend...

http://clickteam.com/English/tgf.php

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