WiiU

Nintendo TVii to Launch in North America December 20

by J.P. Corbran - December 19, 2012, 6:41 am PST
Total comments: 17

Nintendo's video content aggregator is about to make its debut.

Nintendo TVii, the Wii U service that combines TV and video from different sources, launches in North America December 20.

The service, which includes TV listings from various cable and satellite providers, as well as content from streaming services such as Amazon Instant Video and Hulu Plus, brings content from different sources together in a single interface, and adds social functionality that allows you to interact with other users of the service.

TVii will be expanded with additional features in the future, including Netflix and TiVo integration coming in early 2013.

Nintendo Makes TV Smart and Social -- Nintendo TVii Launches Dec. 20

REDMOND, Wash.--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- The company that changed how we play is about to change how we watch. On Dec. 20, Nintendo will introduce Nintendo TVii, a free, integrated service for the recently launched Wii U console that combines what you watch and how you watch into one seamless, second-screen experience on the revolutionary new Wii U GamePad controller.

The rapid increase in both the quality and availability of video entertainment content – hundreds of satellite and cable channels, a seemingly endless amount of video-on-demand options – has made finding something to watch a complex and occasionally frustrating process. The solution to this problem is coming from perhaps an unexpected place: a video game console.

“After Dec. 20, you’ll never look at your TV the same way again,” said Nintendo of America President and COO Reggie Fils-Aime. “Wii U owners have already experienced the transformative effect that the GamePad has on game play and social interaction. Nintendo TVii shows how the integrated second screen of the GamePad can also transform and enhance the TV viewing experience. Welcome to the new world of TVii.”

Nintendo TVii maximizes Wii U owners’ current cable, satellite and video-on-demand services by pulling all of their available content sources – such as a Comcast cable package or Hulu Plus subscription – into one place. This empowers Wii U owners to focus on what they want to watch and not how they want to watch. And once users find the show, sporting event or movie they want, they press an icon and Nintendo TVii does the rest.

In addition to greatly simplifying finding and watching video content, Nintendo TVii also includes a series of social features that enable Wii U owners to share experiences and exciting moments with friends as they are happening on live TV. People can engage with others by commenting and sharing on Miiverse, Facebook and Twitter. Or they can comment, post or tweet about an incredible touchdown, a remarkable performance or a shocking plot twist, all using the personal screen of the Wii U GamePad.

Nintendo TVii requires no additional equipment and can be enjoyed with very little setup, demonstrating what’s possible when the second screen is truly integrated with the TV. Wii U owners can also discover more information about what they’re watching by easily accessing information on the GamePad via an Internet connection, including cast details, movie reviews from Rotten Tomatoes and sports data such as live stats and scores.

Nintendo TVii launches in the United States and Canada on Dec. 20. At launch, the service will support cable and satellite providers in both regions, as well as direct integration with Amazon Instant Video and Hulu Plus subscriptions in the United States. Further integration with Netflix subscriptions and TiVo are expected in early 2013 in the United States. Wii U owners with a Netflix subscription can still access the Netflix application from the Wii U system’s main menu and enjoy their favorite content accordingly.

All elements of the Nintendo TVii service are included in the purchase price of the Wii U system. Users will define which services they currently subscribe to – including the channel lineup in their cable package and video-on-demand service subscriptions – as part of the setup process.

Talkback

Darkurai the Oracle PonyDecember 19, 2012

Oh thank god, I was worried Nintendo would actually get something done without any problems for once.

CericDecember 19, 2012

Without Netflix for me its a what the point.  Wii U has a really uphill battle to win over my PS3 to be my Media box which is a shame.

lolmonadeDecember 19, 2012

Quote from: Ceric

Without Netflix for me its a what the point.  Wii U has a really uphill battle to win over my PS3 to be my Media box which is a shame.


They must have some more kinks to unwind.  I pretty much agree with you, though.  PS3 has been my dedicated "tivo/netflix" box for a while now, and while I will probably tinker with the Tvii features when it launches, this will hardly convert me to using the Wii U as our multimedia device.

In this case, I'm happy they're releasing what they have available now instead of waiting until January until it was all completed, though.

Disco StuDecember 19, 2012

Since I don't have cable, the main reason I'm looking forward to TVii is combining Netflix and Hulu into one interface (I'm not an Amazon Prime subscriber).  So I'll play around with it tomorrow, but this won't be useful to me until next year.

ShyGuyDecember 19, 2012

Curious about this. Im taking my Wii U home for Christmas and my parents have cable.

RazorkidDecember 19, 2012

I'm hoping that the omitted services will be added shortly (like January) instead of later in the new year. In this age of gaming services, I don't expect everything to be ready day one with the understanding that the service is constantly going to be improved upon. I hope Nintendo will continue the pace of improvement of its services that they've set for themselves with the WiiU until consumers (me) are completely satisfied with it.

With that said, it is exciting to be playing with another new feature of the console tomorrow.

TJ SpykeDecember 19, 2012

Quote from: Ceric

Without Netflix for me its a what the point.  Wii U has a really uphill battle to win over my PS3 to be my Media box which is a shame.

You can still use Netflix on the Wii U through its own app, so it's not a big deal that it will be a few weeks before being integrated into Nintendo TVii.

SonofMrPeanutDecember 19, 2012

Quote from: TJ

Quote from: Ceric

Without Netflix for me its a what the point.  Wii U has a really uphill battle to win over my PS3 to be my Media box which is a shame.

You can still use Netflix on the Wii U through its own app, so it's not a big deal that it will be a few weeks before being integrated into Nintendo TVii.

Problem being I can also watch Netflix on a dedicated app on pretty much any other device.  Until it's fused with other services in Early 2013 (hopefully January), Wii U isn't the clear front-runner as my go-to TV-Helper.

CericDecember 19, 2012

Quote from: SonofMrPeanut

Quote from: TJ

Quote from: Ceric

Without Netflix for me its a what the point.  Wii U has a really uphill battle to win over my PS3 to be my Media box which is a shame.

You can still use Netflix on the Wii U through its own app, so it's not a big deal that it will be a few weeks before being integrated into Nintendo TVii.

Problem being I can also watch Netflix on a dedicated app on pretty much any other device.  Until it's fused with other services in Early 2013 (hopefully January), Wii U isn't the clear front-runner as my go-to TV-Helper.

This.

In my current setup I have 5 devices (including TV) that I can watch Netflix on using the TV Screen.  That's not counting the Laptop, 2 Smartphones,  and 3DS.  So effectively in my living room I can be watching 7 different shows on Netflix at any given point, Laptop, 2 Smartphones,  3DS, TV, and Gamepad.  What makes the WiiU different and Better.  At the moment it doesn't match the quality of the PS3 version of Netflix.  Doesn't match the pure features as  a media device as the PS3.  The Value add feature of TVii would be the only good reason then to use the Wii U version.

leahsdadDecember 19, 2012

Quote from: Ceric

Quote from: SonofMrPeanut

Quote from: TJ

Quote from: Ceric

Without Netflix for me its a what the point.  Wii U has a really uphill battle to win over my PS3 to be my Media box which is a shame.

You can still use Netflix on the Wii U through its own app, so it's not a big deal that it will be a few weeks before being integrated into Nintendo TVii.

Problem being I can also watch Netflix on a dedicated app on pretty much any other device.  Until it's fused with other services in Early 2013 (hopefully January), Wii U isn't the clear front-runner as my go-to TV-Helper.

This.

In my current setup I have 5 devices (including TV) that I can watch Netflix on using the TV Screen.  That's not counting the Laptop, 2 Smartphones,  and 3DS.  So effectively in my living room I can be watching 7 different shows on Netflix at any given point, Laptop, 2 Smartphones,  3DS, TV, and Gamepad.  What makes the WiiU different and Better.  At the moment it doesn't match the quality of the PS3 version of Netflix.  Doesn't match the pure features as  a media device as the PS3.  The Value add feature of TVii would be the only good reason then to use the Wii U version.

I'm in the same boat, BUT have you done a real side-by-side comparison?  I've compared Netflix on Wii, Wii U, PC, 3DS, Ipad, Ipod, and AppleTV, and the Wii U and/or PC are BY FAR the best.  The streaming and browsing speed on Wii U and PC are nearly the same, which is incredible since the Wii U is in Wifi.  I don't know how that happens.

And while the Ipad/AppleTV combination is the most comparable to the Gamepad/WiiU Netflix experience, you can't browse on the Ipad's screen, and you can't switch between Ipad display and AppleTV display at all.  And of course, using your Ipad to control your AppleTV is HORRENDOUSLY SLOW and misses inputs, because the Ipad connects to your AppleTV via Wifi.  The Ipad does not have an IR blaster.  I don't know how the Gamepad communicates with the Wii U (Bluetooth, maybe, or RF?).  But those who've used it know that it is super fast.

I'm also curious:  does anyone here actually own and regularly use a DVR?  Why?  In the age of Hulu and Netflix, I can't imagine any reason other than sports to use a DVR.  It's the most ridiculous relic of the VCR age that we have.  20th century technology to make up for the greedy little hands of the TV networks and cable companies, who must know that the writing is on the wall. 

DVRs are good for watching shows not on Hulu or Netflix. For instance, something like Breaking Bad, if you want to go week to week and not wait for the full season to go up on Netflix it's better than having to sit through commercials.

ShyGuyDecember 19, 2012

How doesn't it match the PS3 version of Netflix? It has tablet viewing of shows, touch screen interface, easier typing for searches. What does it lack?

I have the PS3, Wii, and Wii U and I use the Wii U for Netflix.

CericDecember 19, 2012

Quote from: ShyGuy

How doesn't it match the PS3 version of Netflix? It has tablet viewing of shows, touch screen interface, easier typing for searches. What does it lack?

I have the PS3, Wii, and Wii U and I use the Wii U for Netflix.

I found the PS3 version snappier, better looking, and having better Audio quality.  I search so rarely that the better searching and the touch screen is relatively a non-factor.  If I'm going to watch something on the tablet I'll probably just use my phone.  I like the Win Phone interface for Netflix.

Quote from: leahsdad

...
I'm in the same boat, BUT have you done a real side-by-side comparison? 
...

Yes.

JdlbkDecember 20, 2012

What time will the update go live?

UncleBobRichard Cook, Guest ContributorDecember 20, 2012

Quote from: leahsdad

I'm also curious:  does anyone here actually own and regularly use a DVR?  Why?  In the age of Hulu and Netflix, I can't imagine any reason other than sports to use a DVR.  It's the most ridiculous relic of the VCR age that we have.  20th century technology to make up for the greedy little hands of the TV networks and cable companies, who must know that the writing is on the wall. 

Use it and love it.

I don't have Netflix or Hulu Plus memberships.  My wife watches a lot of crappy Food Network and Bravo shows that aren't all available though these services last time I checked.  Just set the DVR to record and watch whenever.

Not to mention, the internet we have here isn't the most reliable of things.

NeoThunderDecember 20, 2012

So without Netflix and TiVo, what's the point?

TJ SpykeDecember 20, 2012

Quote from: NeoThunder

So without Netflix and TiVo, what's the point?

There is still Cable, Satellite, Amazon Instant Video, and Hulu Plus. So it is still worth it. Plus, it's free.

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