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Why New Super Mario Bros. 2 Cannot Rest on the Original's Laurels

by Neal Ronaghan - August 9, 2012, 8:06 am PDT
Total comments: 44

The world of 2D platformers has changed for the better since 2006, making New Super Mario Bros. 2's job harder.

I'm in the early stages of New Super Mario Bros. 2 (review coming later this week) and one thought is coming to mind throughout it: "Wow, this feels awfully similar to New Super Mario Bros. on DS."

As I play it, it makes more sense to know why it's called NSMB 2 and not NSMB 3DS. This isn't a sequel to the Wii version; this is a sequel to the 2006 DS release. That's not a bad thing, mind you, as the original game was a competent Mario game, and after completing roughly half the game's content, NSMB 2 seems much better. The first game is not something I'd call a classic, but I recall enjoying it in 2006. The game's MetaCritic rating stands at an impressive 89. Nintendo World Report's Michael Cole gave the game a 9.0 when it released. Most people dug this game a whole lot in 2006.

But look at the competition in 2006: Yoshi's Island DS, Kirby Squeak Squad, Mega Man Powered Up (PSP). I might be missing one or two, but in that time, 2D platformers were mostly doomed to portables, and in the three I mentioned, I only think one of them (Mega Man) is a good game.

Here's what happened since then: NSMB was stupidly successful. New Super Mario Bros. Wii brought four-player mayhem to the masses in 2009, followed up by Kirby's Epic Yarn, Donkey Kong Country Returns, and Kirby's Return to Dream Land in the ensuing years. I'd be remiss if I didn't mention Wario Land: Shake It, Klonoa, and A Boy and His Blob, which all flew in under the radar before NSMB Wii.

Ubisoft released Rayman Origins in 2011, and its follow-up, Rayman Legends, almost stole the show from the next Mario game, New Super Mario Bros. U, at E3 2012. I haven't even touched on the cadre of downloadable 3DS platformers ranging from Mutant Mudds to VVVVVV. In the interest of time, I'll just skip over the multitudes of quality 2D platformers littering Steam, XBLA, and PSN.

Simply put, the New Super Mario Bros. series helped kick off a 2D platformer renaissance. The genre hasn't seen this much love since the industry went to 3D in the '90s. And that's likely why everyone is so critical of NSMB 2. It's why fans are somewhat ambivalent. We're not starving for 2D platformers. We're not starving for Mario. We're fatted platformer-loving calves.

That doesn't make NSMB 2 any better or worse. My early opinion is that it is a sequel to the original, improving on certain aspects and adding new and more interesting content. It won't set the world ablaze (though it might set sales charts ablaze), and it won't have the impact most 2D Marios do.

At the end of the day, though, I'm just excited to see 2D platformers become a big-time genre again, and comparing the 2006 landscape to the 2012 landscape highlights what a great time it is to be a lover of old-school platformers.

Talkback

neptunepirateAugust 09, 2012

Nice article. Kind of what I was expecting. Nothing new, but still solid. That's all fine and dandy to me. I am looking forward to picking it up, I need a new platformer for my 3DS after completing 3D Land.

geoAugust 09, 2012

Quote from: NWR_Neal]

Daxter was a 3D platformer, was it not?

Quote from: geo

Quote from: NWR_Neal]

Daxter was a 3D platformer, was it not?

If so, I stand corrected on that. I added that because in site awards for 2006, it was always a nominee with the others I mentioned. Thanks!

Ian SaneAugust 09, 2012

I think the 2D platformer resurrgence showed that we really didn't want 3D to outright replace 2D.  During the N64/PS1 era it was like "2D" was a dirty word and it was just 3D all the time.  Now it's clearly treated as just another approach to game design and that's a good thing.  Though Nintendo has gotten a little 2D crazy.  We don't need THIS many 2D platformers.  Still better than before when we got NONE.

Pixelated PixiesAugust 09, 2012

Great time to be a lover of 2D platformers? Absolutely, but let us not forget why 2D platformers fell out of favour in the first place. They became derivative and vapid. Given that Mario tends to chart the course for the platforming genre as whole, with other developers then taking their cue, I'd much prefer that Nintendo take their time between releases and give gamers something fresh. I love platformers, and I care about the genre's long-term viability. Let's have more differentiation between these titles so that people can feel good about supporting them.

MagicCow64August 09, 2012

Gamespot just dropped a 7.0 on it. Which is about how I felt about the first game. Was holding out hope that this was going to tack toward an enhanced Super Mario Bros. 3, with NSMBU tilting toward a revamp of Super Mario World. Looks disappointing on the handheld front, but hopefully NSMBU is as better than NSMB2 as NSMBW was to NSMB. (This nomenclature is getting out of hand)

Killer_Man_JaroTom Malina, Associate Editor (Europe)August 09, 2012

A compelling argument, Neal. The revival of 2D platformers might be my favourite aspect of the 7th generation of games, and of course that includes Mario Bros., but the bar has definitely been raised, as the genre has come along in leaps and bounds since 2006. When it gets down to it, I think what allows the Mario series to endure amongst this currently crowded field is it's mastery of snappy action in level design, as well as it's utilisation of power-ups, which very few other platformers dabble in.

Needless to say, I've thought since E3 that New Super Mario Bros. U was the more exciting and progressive title by a long shot over New Super Mario Bros. 2. But I'll still play it before the year is out.

Pixelated PixiesAugust 09, 2012

Quote from: Killer_Man_Jaro

Needless to say, I've thought since E3 that New Super Mario Bros. U was the more exciting and progressive title by a long shot over New Super Mario Bros. 2. But I'll still play it before the year is out.


Really? What, other than more complex scrolling backgrounds and sharper graphics, have we seen from that game that makes it seem more progressive than the previous NSMB games? The only thing I remember sounding cool was that some journalists had pointed out that the overworld actually made up the backgrounds (so that a mountain on the overworld would be a background in a level). Has there been anything in terms of gameplay that has been shown to indicate that NSMB U will be substantively different?

NSMBU looked nice, but based on what I played of them I thought NSMB2 had better level design and more new gameplay ideas.

Luigi DudeAugust 09, 2012

Quote from: Killer_Man_Jaro

Needless to say, I've thought since E3 that New Super Mario Bros. U was the more exciting and progressive title by a long shot over New Super Mario Bros. 2. But I'll still play it before the year is out.

That's because NSMB U is being made by the team that made the previous NSMB games and has become a lot more experienced now.  It also helps that NSMB U has been in development since NSMB Wii was finished and so more time will have been worked on it.  NSMB 2 on the other hand was made by a brand new team that had never done a Mario titles before and basically had a year to do it which is why they just reused the NSMB Wii engine and kept the same music and bosses to save time.

I wouldn't be surprised if the Wii U version has a lot more new features to it that Nintendo hasn't shown yet because they didn't want the Wii U version to completely overshadow the 3DS game for the 3DS XL launch.

Quote from: NWR_insanolord

NSMBU looked nice, but based on what I played of them I thought NSMB2 had better level design and more new gameplay ideas.

That was only a 3 level demo though.  Like I said, if NSMB U does bring more new gameplay ideas to the table, they might be saving them for a latter reveal, like the Fall conference to help hype up the game more and make sure it didn't completely overshadow NSMB 2 before its launch.  Remember that NSMB 2 at E3 was much closer to release then NSMB U, and so NSMB 2 needed to be hyped up more hence why the demo's for that game had better levels and they had no problem showing the new ideas that game brought to the table.  While they intentionally picked the most basic levels for NSMB U because they're saving to newer and crazier reveals for a later date.

Killer_Man_JaroTom Malina, Associate Editor (Europe)August 09, 2012

Quote from: Pixelated

Really? What, other than more complex scrolling backgrounds and sharper graphics, have we seen from that game that makes it seem more progressive than the previous NSMB games? The only thing I remember sounding cool was that some journalists had pointed out that the overworld actually made up the backgrounds (so that a mountain on the overworld would be a background in a level). Has there been anything in terms of gameplay that has been shown to indicate that NSMB U will be substantively different?

The step up in presentation and production values counts for a lot, in my view. Aside from that, the Wii U game has new environmental themes, new enemies, more moving parts in the levels and what seem like the most interesting power-ups of the NSMB sub-series. Let's be relative here: it's still a 2D Mario game, so it's never going to deviate too far from the tried-and-true. However, whereas NSMB 2 seems to be a step back from NSMB Wii (I can't say for sure because I haven't played it; that's just my perception), NSMB U looks like it's going to be a good step up from the Wii title.

I'm not shooting down NSMB 2 - in fact, the recent preview on NWR has enthused me a lot more about the game. This is just what I've observed from videos and general impressions.

Anth0nyAugust 09, 2012

I find it hard to garner excitement for a game that we outright know was handed to the B team, while the A
team is working on U. Which we'll be playing in no more than three months, by the way!

So far, reviews haven't exactly been glistening for the game. Maybe some are okay with simply a "solid" sequel to NSMB DS. I hold the Mario franchise to a higher standard than that. Of course, I'll give my final judgement when I play and finish the game, but things aren't looking good from where I'm standing.

Mario Shmario. WHERE'S MY ANIMAL CROSSING!?!?!?!?

It'll be funny when NSMB U comes out and it's just a marginal increase from NSMB Wii. I have a feeling everyone decrying NSMB 2 now will either come around on both games, or be Cranky Kong, sitting around all pissed off at both games.

It is honestly refreshing because, at least to me, I can tell it's a new group of people working on NSMB 2. There's a certain creativity that I'm noticing that I really like. It's not revolutionary but to me, for this game, it doesn't need to be. We're in a world where this and Galaxy-like games can co-exist. As long as that continues, I welcome the safe 2D platformer every now and then.

Ian SaneAugust 09, 2012

Part of the appeal of NSMB was that it was a throwback.  When it came out we hadn't played a game like that in years.  If they released that same game as an N64 launch title it would have been seen as a weak effort.  It really isn't exceptional.  It's like Contra Rebirth or Mega Man 9 - a retro style game that benefits from the novelty of playing a type of game that no one really makes anymore.

NSMB sold really well and Nintendo came to the conclusion that this should become a big series for them.  But the problem is that what made NSMB stand out no longer applies.  2D platformers are common and Nintendo makes more of them than anybody.  The gameplay style of retro SMB is no longer a throwback, it's contemporary.  These new NSMB games are now like if the first NSMB was released ten years earlier when it would have had to deal with direct comparisons to games like SMW, DKC and Yoshi's Island.  There is no "wow, I haven't played a Mario game like this in a long time!" appeal anymore.  These games have to stand on their merits.

Pixelated PixiesAugust 09, 2012

Quote from: NWR_Neal

It'll be funny when NSMB U comes out and it's just a marginal increase from NSMB Wii. I have a feeling everyone decrying NSMB 2 now will either come around on both games, or be Cranky Kong, sitting around all pissed off at both games.


I don't know. That's a pretty reductive view of what are, in my opinion, valid criticisms of the NSMB series, and ones which are worth voicing. I've been pretty critical of both NSMB 2 and U, but I'm not pissed off about it. I just think the NSMB series is stuck in a rut and as a fan of Nintendo I naturally want to talk about it with people who are similarly interested. It kind of bothers me when people automatically equate criticism with being querulous.

@PixelatedPixies - I don't think I was clear, but I was referencing the people who were hating hardcore of NSMB 2 and thinking NSMB U would be the saving grace of the series.

I'm generally positive on both games, but I see the complaints people have of the overarching series (though not as much on NSMB 2 as my opinion right now as I'm more than halfway through is that it's pretty dang good).

Pixelated PixiesAugust 09, 2012

Quote from: NWR_Neal

@PixelatedPixies - I don't think I was clear, but I was referencing the people who were hating hardcore of NSMB 2 and thinking NSMB U would be the saving grace of the series.

I'm generally positive on both games, but I see the complaints people have of the overarching series (though not as much on NSMB 2 as my opinion right now as I'm more than halfway through is that it's pretty dang good).


Ah, right. Perhaps I misunderstood. It seemed like you were saying that those who are criticial of NSMB 2 were either being belligerent and would change their opinion when NSMB U came out, or alternatively they would remain consistent in their criticism and would be 'sitting around all pissed off'.

I guess in a weird sort of way though, we actually agree. You seem to be positive on both games, me less so, but we're both saying that 2 and U, at least at this point, seem similar enough that to praise one and criticise the other seems odd.

Regardless, I look forward to playing NSMB 2 for myself to decide one way or the other how I feel about it.

AVAugust 09, 2012

I agree with the article 100% but I know what the problem is.


Its me, I'll know its not as good as it should be but I BUY it and Nintendo is encouraged because of sales and it keeps doing it. The huge sales figures just prove nintendo doesn't need to innovate it will sell regardless which is sad but true.

I didn't buy the first NSMB. I'm not intending to buy this one... I'm not part of the problem. &P

Now on the other hand, if we were talking about Animal Crossing... I'm SO part of the problem, and unabashedly so!

NinSageAugust 09, 2012

I like this article.  It got 2 things really right ...

1. The NSMB franchise is responsible for showing the industry that 2D platformers can be relevant in a post-3D-graphics world.

2. The resurgence of the genre does not make NSMB2 better or worse.  It only gives the general audience a different, more critical, perspective.

Well done, Neal.

famicomplicatedJames Charlton, Associate Editor (Japan)August 10, 2012

Hey Neal, we agree with each other dude!


It's a decent Mario game, sure, but it's also exactly the same as 2 before it.
Mario games are usually the best platformers (I haven't played Rayman Origins) so they're always going to be "good", but I guess it's getting harder and harder to reinvent the wheel with this particular branch of the Mario adventures.


If you've been playing these games forever and started getting the deja-vu feeling during, say, NSMB Wii - be prepared for a massive dose of it with NSMB2, things come at you in the same order and look strikingly similar to the previous games, more than I've ever felt before.
When you look at the homebrew scene, the Reggie! editor and projects like "Newer" Super Mario Bros, you really get the feeling Nintendo are just being lazy. Heck the "Newer" team have put out another 2 level packs since then, including holiday themed ones, crazy inventive stuff....which they do for no money.


I guess Nintendo is stuck between a rock and a hard place - satisfy the hardcore by killing off the NSMB brand and making something entirely new Vs making a crap tonne of money and merely mildly pleasing the core...

I just came to an odd conclusion, and it's that the New Super Mario Bros. games are like Madden. They're good games, which I enjoy playing and continue to buy, but their massive success is causing the developers to play it a bit too safe and preventing them from giving the series the significant overhaul it really needs.

NinSageAugust 10, 2012

Quote from: NWR_insanolord

... the New Super Mario Bros. games are like Madden.

::)

J.P. - When NSMB games come out every year, then that point will hold a little more water. I get what you mean, though. I see NSMB as delicious comfort food. Madden and Call of Duty are like the cheap beer and potato chips of the gaming industry. NSMB is more like a delectable, sugary pack of cookies.

Quote from: NinSage

Quote from: NWR_insanolord

... the New Super Mario Bros. games are like Madden.

::)

If you'd actually read and thought about what I said instead of making your kneejerk sarcastic reaction, you'd see that, in terms of what I said, it's a good comparison. It breaks down in a few places, as Neal pointed out, but in those specific ways it holds true.

They're good games that play it maybe a bit too safe because their big sales success makes it risky/unnecessary to deviate too much. I'd love to see a reboot of Madden like the ones EA's done of NHL and FIFA that made them amazing, and I'd love to see a 2D Mario with the creativity and experimentation that we've seen in recent 3D Marios, but we're not going to get those when the current ones continue to perform as well as they do.

Ian SaneAugust 10, 2012

Quote from: NWR_insanolord

I just came to an odd conclusion, and it's that the New Super Mario Bros. games are like Madden. They're good games, which I enjoy playing and continue to buy, but their massive success is causing the developers to play it a bit too safe and preventing them from giving the series the significant overhaul it really needs.

I think this applies to Nintendo as a whole.  They took a big risk with Wii Sports and the Wii in general but once it took off everything was safe.  Lost and lots of sequels and the whole Xenoblade fiasco where NOA didn't want to release it because it wasn't a sure-fire hit.  Aside from Wii Sports and Xenoblade I can't think of any first party Wii game released in North America where there wasn't some sort of established brand behind and thus a pre-existing audience expected to buy it.  Even something that underperformed like Wii Music wasn't really a big risk because it had that Wii Series name on it, already well established by Wii Sports.  Sin & Punishment 2 didn't do too well but the reason we got the game was because the original was surprisingly popular on the VC.  The game bombed but Nintendo thought there was an existing audience for it.  It wasn't a risky title in that they had to hope it would create an audience.  They assumed an audience was there and it just wasn't as they expected.

Everyone wants mainstream appeal.  Once a company has it, they want to keep it and they're incredibly scared of losing it so they become conservative.  That's NSMB and that's Nintendo.  They're playing to not lose.

Luigi DudeAugust 10, 2012

Quote from: Ian

Quote from: NWR_insanolord

I just came to an odd conclusion, and it's that the New Super Mario Bros. games are like Madden. They're good games, which I enjoy playing and continue to buy, but their massive success is causing the developers to play it a bit too safe and preventing them from giving the series the significant overhaul it really needs.

I think this applies to Nintendo as a whole.  They took a big risk with Wii Sports and the Wii in general but once it took off everything was safe.  Lost and lots of sequels and the whole Xenoblade fiasco where NOA didn't want to release it because it wasn't a sure-fire hit.  Aside from Wii Sports and Xenoblade I can't think of any first party Wii game released in North America where there wasn't some sort of established brand behind and thus a pre-existing audience expected to buy it.  Even something that underperformed like Wii Music wasn't really a big risk because it had that Wii Series name on it, already well established by Wii Sports.  Sin & Punishment 2 didn't do too well but the reason we got the game was because the original was surprisingly popular on the VC.  The game bombed but Nintendo thought there was an existing audience for it.  It wasn't a risky title in that they had to hope it would create an audience.  They assumed an audience was there and it just wasn't as they expected.

Everyone wants mainstream appeal.  Once a company has it, they want to keep it and they're incredibly scared of losing it so they become conservative.  That's NSMB and that's Nintendo.  They're playing to not lose.

This applies to most of the videogame industry as a whole though.  Nearly every videogame company when they get a popular franchise, they keep making sequels to it until the series dies then they move on.  The only thing that makes Nintendo different is a lot of Nintendo popular franchises have stayed popular over the last 20 years which is why they keep making sequels to them.  While most other companies see some of their more popular franchises eventually die on them, which leads them to make more major new IP's because they have to instead of Nintendo who invest more in smaller new IP's because their major series are still going strong.

What it all comes down to is Nintendo does a much better job of handling their IP's which is why they remain popular each gen vs most other studio's that kill their franchises.  In the case of NSMB, it's remained strong because Nintendo only released one per console and before this year spaced out the releases.  There was a 3.5 year gap between NSMB DS and NSMB Wii, and almost a 3 year gap between NSMB Wii and NSMB 2.  Now there will only be a 3 month gap between NSMB 2 and NSMB U, which is very close, but like I've said before, they'll be at least a 5 year gap between NSMB U and the next NSMB, so it'll balance out in the end since anyone that won't buy one of the NSMB this year will eventually buy the other a few years later.

NinSageAugust 10, 2012

NSMB : Madden :: Nerf Ball : Bullet

Madden doesn't kill people.

Quote from: NinSage

NSMB : Madden :: Nerf Ball : Bullet

MarioParty : Madden :: Bullet : Bullet ?

I knew it! Mario Party IS Madden! Or is Madden a Bullet Bill? Mario Party is Banzai Bill? Is there a Bullet Bob?

tendoboy1984August 10, 2012

For those of you who expect more from handheld Mario games...

Have you ever played any of the Mario Land games on the old Game Boy? Super Mario Land 1 is basically a dumbed-down version of Super Mario Bros., with shitty physics and even worse graphics. Super Mario Land 2 is like a weird hybrid of Super Mario World and Super Mario Bros. 3, with bizarre level designs.

And to be more specific:
Super Mario 3D Land is basically a dumbed-down version of Super Mario Galaxy, without the cool gravity effects and creative level design.

All of the handheld Mario games have paled in comparison to their console counterparts. The console games have bigger budgets and bigger development teams, so of course they seem more impressive. Just look at all the PSP versions of PS2 / PS3 games...


I rest my case.

You take back what you said about Mario 3D Land you... you... You big meanie!

Pixelated PixiesAugust 11, 2012

Quote from: tendoboy1984

And to be more specific:
Super Mario 3D Land is basically a dumbed-down version of Super Mario Galaxy, without the cool gravity effects and creative level design.


I don't think I agree. Of course handheld games are less expansive and maybe a little less complicated, but that's because they should be. What I want from a handheld game is something which is snappy, easy to pick up and play, and which keeps in mind the control limitations of the system and is, therefore, designed around them.

For me Super Mario 3D Land was an almost perfect handheld Mario game. Does it share some DNA with the Galaxy games? Well, yes, at least aesthetically; but I certainly don't think of it as being dumbed down. I think the people behind 3D Land showed a great amount of intelligence. They managed to take the essentials of a 3D Mario game, marry it to some of the mechanics normally only seen in a 2D Mario game, and in the process created something which can fit comfortably into neither category. More important than any of that though, the game is packed with delicious little levels which are just as smart and fun as anything we've seen on a home console.

For me Super Mario 3D Land is as successful at being a handheld game as the Galaxy games are at being console games.

tendoboy1984August 11, 2012

Quote from: Pixelated

Quote from: tendoboy1984

And to be more specific:
Super Mario 3D Land is basically a dumbed-down version of Super Mario Galaxy, without the cool gravity effects and creative level design.


I don't think I agree. Of course handheld games are less expansive and maybe a little less complicated, but that's because they should be. What I want from a handheld game is something which is snappy, easy to pick up and play, and which keeps in mind the control limitations of the system and is, therefore, designed around them.

For me Super Mario 3D Land was an almost perfect handheld Mario game. Does it share some DNA with the Galaxy games? Well, yes, at least aesthetically; but I certainly don't think of it as being dumbed down. I think the people behind 3D Land showed a great amount of intelligence. They managed to take the essentials of a 3D Mario game, marry it to some of the mechanics normally only seen in a 2D Mario game, and in the process created something which can fit comfortably into neither category. More important than any of that though, the game is packed with delicious little levels which are just as smart and fun as anything we've seen on a home console.

For me Super Mario 3D Land is as successful at being a handheld game as the Galaxy games are at being console games.

But why should Nintendo need to create two different gaming experiences on handhelds and consoles? Why not give handheld systems the same A-team efforts and budgets as console games? It seems handhelds are always treated like second-class citizens.

Pixelated PixiesAugust 11, 2012

Quote from: tendoboy1984

Quote from: Pixelated

Quote from: tendoboy1984

And to be more specific:
Super Mario 3D Land is basically a dumbed-down version of Super Mario Galaxy, without the cool gravity effects and creative level design.


I don't think I agree. Of course handheld games are less expansive and maybe a little less complicated, but that's because they should be. What I want from a handheld game is something which is snappy, easy to pick up and play, and which keeps in mind the control limitations of the system and is, therefore, designed around them.

For me Super Mario 3D Land was an almost perfect handheld Mario game. Does it share some DNA with the Galaxy games? Well, yes, at least aesthetically; but I certainly don't think of it as being dumbed down. I think the people behind 3D Land showed a great amount of intelligence. They managed to take the essentials of a 3D Mario game, marry it to some of the mechanics normally only seen in a 2D Mario game, and in the process created something which can fit comfortably into neither category. More important than any of that though, the game is packed with delicious little levels which are just as smart and fun as anything we've seen on a home console.

For me Super Mario 3D Land is as successful at being a handheld game as the Galaxy games are at being console games.

But why should Nintendo need to create two different gaming experiences on handhelds and consoles? Why not give handheld systems the same A-team efforts and budgets as console games? It seems handhelds are always treated like second-class citizens.


I don't think that handheld Mario games have been treated as being worth less than their console counter parts. I would agree that during the GBA era handheld Mario games lived in the shadows of the console games, but both before and after they did their own thing. I personally think the Gameboy Mario games are pretty cool, as they had their own weird twist on the NES games; and I also think that the DS game and 3D Land were fun.

For me, handheld Mario games have been defined by their systems rather than by any second-class treatment. I think they've been given the care and attention that they deserve. Money and resources is another matter, but care and attention is what they've had plenty of.

Super Mario 3D Land is the best game in the series, so if anything the console games need to receive the same level of effort as the handheld ones.

Wasn't 3D Land made by the Galaxy team?

Yes. When you think about it, every EAD Tokyo game has been better than the previous one.

Then it's not the Sony issue of B-teams being on the handhelds.

I think the only original game where you could consider that is NSMB2 (which isn't to its detriment, in my eyes). The Super Mario Land series dealt with heavy limitations but it wasn't by the B-teams. Unless you consider senior developers from Metroid and Kid Icarus as the B-team, in which case, you crazy.

They may have been good developers, but they were also guys who had no experience with Mario or anything like it, so calling them the B team isn't entirely unfair.

So what about New Super Mario Bros.? It was directed by a guy who assistant directed Sunshine and worked on a bunch of the GBA ports. And, as previously said, 3D Land was by EAD Tokyo, who made both Galaxy games!

I'm just finding this PSP/Vita comparison absurd. When I see Naughty Dog make Uncharted Vita, then people can think of making that comparison. Especially now, the line between handheld and home console is blurred. I mean, look at Uprising.

tendoboy1984August 12, 2012

Quote from: NWR_Neal

So what about New Super Mario Bros.? It was directed by a guy who assistant directed Sunshine and worked on a bunch of the GBA ports. And, as previously said, 3D Land was by EAD Tokyo, who made both Galaxy games!

I'm just finding this PSP/Vita comparison absurd. When I see Naughty Dog make Uncharted Vita, then people can think of making that comparison. Especially now, the line between handheld and home console is blurred. I mean, look at Uprising.

Graphically, handhelds are quickly cathing up to consoles, but the gameplay aspects are still a bit outdated compared to what's on the PS3 and Xbox 360.


Sony is trying to further bring handheld and home console games together. They have good incentives, but Vita sales prove that no one really cares. :(

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