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Episode 332: Cartooning

by James Jones, Jon Lindemann, Jonathan Metts, and Guillaume Veillette - April 7, 2013, 4:24 pm PDT
Total comments: 28

My name is Adol. Do you remember me? Hello, it's me, Adol. Yeah, over here. Still Adol.

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Now that things are settling down a bit for the group, we're ready to refocus on the latest Nintendo releases and finally wrap up the current RetroActive. From his new home base in the ATL, Jon kicks it off with his well-informed thoughts on Monster Hunter 3 Ultimate for 3DS, and yes ladies, he's playing it with the Circle Pad Pro. Jonny cracks open the oddly structured Need for Speed: Most Wanted U (or "Must Wanted") to enjoy Criterion's long-awaited return to Nintendo platforms. Gui follows up his new review of Toki Tori 2 with some extra discussion of this lauded new Wii U eShop game. James bats clean-up by digging into a GameCube Grab Bag. The first to fall under his sights are a couple of forgotten Capcom experiments: Auto Modellista and P.N. 03.

After a quick break, we hang onto Jon for a little while longer to discuss some topics of late. Those include the dissolution and legacy of LucasArts, as well as much-discussed analysis of Satoru Iwata's decade as President of Nintendo Co. Ltd. (The blog we referenced is by Emily Rogers over at NotEnoughShaders.) Then the other three hang on for one last dip into the world of Ys, as we dissect Book II and say goodbye to this very interesting, user-chosen game of yore.

We'll get back to your Listener Mail this week, so why not send in a question while it's on the mind?

This podcast was edited by Guillaume Veillette.

Music for this episode of Radio Free Nintendo is used with permission from Jason Ricci & New Blood. You can purchase their newest album, Done with the Devil, directly from the record label, Amazon (CD) (MP3), or iTunes, or call your local record store and ask for it!

Additional music for this episode of Radio Free Nintendo is copyrighted to Nintendo and is included under fair use protection.

Talkback

Retro DeckadesApril 07, 2013

I thought I would help to clarify a few things about Need for Speed: Most Wanted U. Some of this information can be picked up from the tickers on the loading screens, or from the in-game manual.


1. Cops don't randomly pursue you. If you speed past them, hit them, etc. then they will give chase. If you drive by them slowly you will likely be just fine.


2. There is a consequence to getting "Busted" by the cops. Each pursuit is sort of treated as it's own event, for which you can earn additional SP (Speed Points, which help to unlock "Most Wanted" races. See number 4.) The longer the pursuit, the more SP you can earn. However, if you are "Busted", you lose all of the SP you had accumulated.


Also, if you are tired of the cops pursuing you, you can always use the control pad to access the easy drive menu and jump into a race, avoiding the pursuit.


3. I found the turning issue is easily solved by drifting -- tapping the brake while in a turn to begin sliding. From there, it takes a little practice to finesse it.


4. It is possible to win races with every different car (yes, even the Ford Raptor). Every car has its own set of 5 or so race events. These can be found by accessing the Easy Drive menu. By using different cars to complete their individual events, you will unlock upgrades for that vehicle.


The only races in which you choose which car to drive are the "Most Wanted" races. These races are unlocked as you gain more SP, and feature the faster cars in the game. It may not be possible to win these races using every car (certainly not without upgrading), but yes, you will likely want to unlock faster cars before attempting some of these.

And yes, somewhere someone at Criterion is laughing their ass off because of his decision to put some of these cars in this game (I'm looking at you, Ford Raptor).

Thanks for the tips. I'll say that a lot of that information is definitely not apparent in the game, and I've played it for a few hours now.

pokepal148April 07, 2013

Quote from: Jonnyboy117

Thanks for the tips. I'll say that a lot of that information is definitely not apparent in the game, and I've played it for a few hours now.

seems to be a trend with Wii U games,  i am starting to think mh3u has a worse tutorial then the original

Retro DeckadesApril 07, 2013

Quote from: Jonnyboy117

Thanks for the tips. I'll say that a lot of that information is definitely not apparent in the game, and I've played it for a few hours now.

Yeah, it took me a little while to learn all that myself, and I'm sure there's more I have yet to glean. To be honest, I'm not all that surprised since, as you mentioned, the game has no tutorial and drops you right into the world.

pokepal148April 07, 2013

Quote from: Retro

Quote from: pokepal148

Quote from: Jonnyboy117

Thanks for the tips. I'll say that a lot of that information is definitely not apparent in the game, and I've played it for a few hours now.

seems to be a trend with Wii U games,  i am starting to think mh3u has a worse tutorial then the original

Yeah, it took me a little while to learn all that myself, and I'm sure there's more I have yet to glean. To be honest, I'm not all that surprised since, as you mentioned, the game has no tutorial and drops you right into the world.

tri taught you the basics and such in single player

house3136April 07, 2013

Guillaume’s reference to Okami giving away the solution is correct, but this could also be applied to Zelda. Like Skyward Sword’s Fi, Okami’s Issun gets annoyingly blatant on how to proceed. However, the first time I played Okami I quit for several months because I didn’t know what to do next. I’m glad I went back, because I have completed it multiple times since. After beating Skyward Sword’s Hero Mode I decided to check out a couple of LPs. Only about one in four finished the game; not because it is so long, but because the player became so annoyed with Fi/Issun, that they ignored the help given, got lost, frustrated, then quit. The ones that finished were previous Zelda players. I understand not everyone is a fan of the genre nor has the time to dedicate to such titles; but being led through a game and told what to do next is very common practice these days. Players have been conditioned to this, so your reference to Toki Tori in this regard is apt.

This also introduces the question: How much assistance it too much or too little? I recall Paper Mario: Sticker Star receiving criticism for not leading the player enough on how to appropriately apply specific items; and the descriptions of said items were too vague, which led to confusion and frustration from the player. There seems to be a disconnect from the developers, for some games, as to how much prompting is necessary for the players, of different abilities, to enjoy a smooth experience without spoiling the gameplay for the core audience.

FjurbanskiApril 07, 2013

Quote from: house3136

This also introduces the question: How much assistance it too much or too little? I recall Paper Mario: Sticker Star receiving criticism for not leading the player enough on how to appropriately apply specific items; and the descriptions of said items were too vague, which led to confusion and frustration from the player. There seems to be a disconnect from the developers, for some games, as to how much prompting is necessary for the players, of different abilities, to enjoy a smooth experience without spoiling the gameplay for the core audience.

Ah, Sticker Star. I think the reason Sticker Star's lack of direction doesn't work is because the game is divided into levels (like toki tori), which gives the player the impression that everything they need to complete the level will be in that level (or at the very least, within the world that the level is on). That's why Toki Tori's lack of direction works in a way Sticker Star's couldn't. Because everything you need to complete the level is within that level. In Sticker Star, things you need to progress might be in some random room in some random level that you may not have even gone to yet, because it's not a part of the natural progression of the game (Y's Book I, anyone?). And even if you do get the item before you need it, the possibility space of what that item can do is too big. Is it used to unlock a path? Is it used for this boss? Is it used for another boss? Does it not do anything at all? And if you use it at the wrong time you've got to treck all the way back to "sling-a-thing" and pay money to get another sticker. Sticker Star's problem was not that it didn't direct you where to go. Its problem was that it needed to direct you where to go in the first place, because its design was not nearly as well thought out or intuitive as Toki Tori 2's.


That's why many people want Zelda games to be less hand-holdy. Because we know that everything we need to complete the dungeon is within the dungeon, so just let us explore the dungeon. Once I'm out of the dungeon, sure give me a little direction where to go next.

EnnerApril 08, 2013

Good show.

Most Wanted explains itself poorly so you're not alone in your bewilderment. As mentioned above, each car has its own set of events specific to it so there's no choosing a different car. If the events are tough (and they are hard), there's nothing you can do except drive better or hope the rubber band doesn't hurt you the next time. Just pick a car you like and earn enough speed points to unlock all the Most Wanted cars. Then, pick the fastest car you can and take down the cars on the most wanted list. That's pretty much the single player. The multiplayer is a different beast and, I believe, has little carry-over between the single player progression.

I was thinking of sending an e-mail asking the panel to discuss the Rogers article, so I'm happy you guys beat me to the punch. There's already a thread about it in the Nintendo Console Discussion where I posted my thoughts. I agree that this is the easiest time to be negative on Iwata and Nintendo. I have hope that things will get better for the company and its products.

Oh! Yay for the P.N. 03 discussion. I don't think it's a good game at all - either as a third-person shooter or a shoot'em up - but I'm happy to own it. Though... I think I paid $39.99 for it which is the MSRP it shipped at.

Furious FrancisApril 08, 2013

Let me add a couple things to the whole Wii U is tanking thing. First John L needs to know his material before he talks. He makes the Wii U situation look worse than the Vita situation which is not the case. The Wii U is outselling the Vita on a worldwide bases. Yes, In Japan the the Vita outsold the Wii U, but portables do better in Japan, than consoles. The Wii U has also sold more than the PS3 and Xbox 360 did in their first 4 months on the market.... so were those systems tanking as well? Hell, what new system, other than the Wii hasn't tanked at it's launch?


The Wii U should be compared to other consoles on the market in Japan, which last week in Japan, it was the top selling home console. Trying to cover that up, or use the Vita to make your point was stupid. Second, I guess John L and the guys on the podcast here didn't get a chance to look at the Wii U sales. Because in the past months the sales have steadily increased in each region. The internet is making the situation look a lot worse than it actually is. Jan - 57K, Feb - 65 K, March - at least be 70 K or higher with the release of games like Lego City, Monster Hunter, and Need for Speed.


Next, he blames Iwata, for their mistakes, and in the end, I don't see the mistakes their having. Nintendo's games take a long time to develop for quality purposes. You just have to wait. I would have liked to get games sooner, but if it's not ready, it's not ready. Miyamoto takes forever to make his games. The Nintendo developers have more power than John L gives them credit for.


And my last point I want to make is why should Nintendo pander to Western game studios? If the Wii U had better graphics they still wouldn't support Nintendo as much. Western studios don't support Nintendo because they are afraid of Nintendo's killer Ips. They don't want to compete against Mario, Zelda, and Metroid. What should have Nintendo done? Make hardware as powerful as the PS4 and launch it at $400+ in 2012?


Should Nintendo pay Western developers to bring over their shooters so John L can play them on there? We all know those are his favorite genre. I think Nintendo should do what Nintendo does. Make great games. And at E3 were going to see that. You want to bash Iwata for the failures of Wii U at this point, and not give him credit for the 3DS? If anything he's 50-50 right now. The Wii U will turn things around, the sales of Monster Hunter 3 Ultimate in Europe and the US prove people will pick up the system if there are games.



azekeApril 08, 2013

On that Iwata piece.

From what i understand author paints the picture of Iwata constantly spewing BS by cherry picking a few quotes from his interviews in the span of a decade and implying he's not really learning from his mistakes.

In one of the pre Wii U interviews he said that the main problem with 3ds launch was that that it lacked first party bestsellers. That was what he perceived as his mistake and that was his goal for Wii U launch. He "corrected" that with NSMB U and NL. You might argue he did it poorly, that NSMB's well got poisioned by 2 on 3DS but he did something.

His another goal was to provide third party FPS game on day one and he did it. With 2 FPSs even.

Yeah, that didn't do much, but don't say he's repeating the same mistakes. More like fixing some mistakes while making new ones.

On Zelda puzzles vs Toki Tori puzzles.

Zelda puzzles annoy me greatly. Lots of items in inventory and different actions available make it too hard to simply bruteforce the solution if it's just too illogical to figure out. Even freaking La Mulana has more enjoyable and intuitive puzzles (for me).

Toki Tori 2 puzzles are like a bliss in comparison. There is no inventory, only two actions and deliberate decision to remove all text from the game leaves no chance for misunderstanding.

Pixelated PixiesApril 08, 2013

I loved this episode guys. Great work. New Business, discussion of Nintendo's fortunes, and Retroactive. What else could you possibly want from an episode of RFN?

I'm off to read that Emily Rogers article. It sounds...interesting.

CericApril 08, 2013

Alright...

I'm going to have to come in on Lindy with the Monster Hunter stuff.  You obviously skipped a lot of the text because they literally tell you right in the text that this is what you combine, this is why you combine, this is your weapons, this is how you make them, this is why your hunting.  Unfortunetly the translators drowned that in Frivilous text.

Yes, their probably should be a way to have a mentor of some sort to show how the different weapons work.  Unfortunately they also made this version simpler on some of them.

No, Dr.Metts I think its the same as what you said with Dark Soul.  Without the community and the need for the community the game wouldn't be nearly as compelling.

So I could lead the Crash Leaderboard on Need for Speed.

The whole Need for Speed thing is the whole Arcade Racer vs Car Simulator.  I liked the Cruis'n series back in the day (Arcade Racer) but, I'm not fond of Gran Tourismo (Car Simulator).  If you are simulating Cars then yeah their are going to be some clear winners and loser unfortunately.

matx88April 08, 2013

It's Dragon Quest IV in which you disguise as a monster in Psaro's castle

KDR_11kApril 08, 2013

One major thing about PN03 is that the game is practically broken in easy mode (you can just kill everything before it becomes a threat, even bosses can be killed just by spamming supers) and normal mode starts you off with a badly balanced first level. I think the "pop and shoot" complaint applies doubly to Vanquish though since it's a cover shooter and sticking to cover is the safest option.

FjurbanskiApril 08, 2013

If Iwata is responsible for everything, then let's give Iwata credit for making the Wii U basically frictionless for indie developers, giving away free devs kits (allegedly), and basically turning the most secretive company in gaming into the most open and accesible. Via Iwata Asks, Nintendo Directs, talking to us directly through Miiverse, and everything they're doing for indies, Nintendo has quickly become the most fun company to follow. Of course, that doesn't do much for sales at the moment, but I love it.

Oh, and on Ys Book II. I didn't join in the conversation for this one because I just stopped playing it. (right after the green face that spits out the worm tongue) It wasn't fun for me to fight every boss just using the fire magic. And everything else... I was just tired of the game.

house3136April 08, 2013

Ah, thank you Fjurbanski for answering my question. It can be hard comparing four separate games across different genres. I was drawing similarities between Skyward Sword and Paper Mario because they both have guides, Fi and Kersti. For Skyward Sword, I meant more of the over-worlds in relation to Skyloft; “Put the tablet here; the column of light is right in front of you, idiot.” “The pinwheel is probably over there.” treatment. People who know Zelda get this more naturally. And I agree once in the dungeon, the progress is better outlined, like Toki Tori 2; whereas Sticker Star is too vague to a fault. Kersti could be more helpful in this regard. I think we’re in accordance, and hope these issues are ironed out in future installments.

In terms of Iwata, in other forums I’ve been reading there has been a lot of calling for Iwata’s dismissal with regard to Wii U. Games are being delayed, failure to optimize services and the OS.  All I can do is put myself in Iwata’s shoes. Miyamoto or any producer/director comes to me and says “We’ve found a way to make the game better/ add a new feature, but it’s going to cause a delay.” This is hypothetical because most of the transparency we have is from Iwata Asks and Nintendo Direct, but it doesn’t seem unreasonable. You are now in charge of making the executive decisions.  Ship Wii U at holiday with a couple games to pad financial reports, or delay until a full game lineup is ready, and risk upsetting Wii U owners either way?

Building upon what’s been stated in the NWR forums already, there is no guarantee a replacement for Iwata is automatically going to prosper Nintendo. “He said this in 2006, and then changed his tune three years later.”  Yeah, hardware/software CEO’s will do that, times change. Emily Rogers, isn’t she the one who said she wouldn’t write any more articles if her predictions and speculation on rumors toward the game industry didn’t pan out? She must have amnesia. If Wii U is eventually supported like 3DS is now, I think it will succeed. I don’t see anyone calling for Iwata’s head in any of the Pokemon X&Y, Fire Emblem, Luigi’s Mansion, Animal Crossing, Shin Megami Tensei, or Mario & Luigi threads. How strange for a console that went through the same 6+ months of doom and gloom threads.

“Everyone from Nintendo and the Wii generation has moved to smartphones/tablets; however, nobody from PS3 and Xbox, who are concerned with performance and graphics, has moved to PC.” One could argue that the expansion of casual games on mobile devices could benefit Nintendo once those gamers want to “upgrade” to more dedicated devices. I’ll have to borrow Michael Pachter’s crystal ball to confirm that one though.  Getting games like Watch Dogs is great, but I bought a Wii U for games I can’t play on PC; same goes for PS4 and Xbox. Can Iwata do better? Yes. Should Reggie be replaced and NOA given more freedom? Yes.

CericApril 08, 2013

I sure Hope Lindy isn't going to buy a Vita or a PS4 or Next Box because the Wii U is over priced so by default those are VASTLY over priced.

Glad0sApril 08, 2013

Quote from: Ceric

I sure Hope Lindy isn't going to buy a Vita or a PS4 or Next Box because the Wii U is over priced so by default those are VASTLY over priced.

Quote from: Ceric

I'm going to have to come in on Lindy with the Monster Hunter stuff.  You obviously skipped a lot of the text because they literally tell you right in the text that this is what you combine, this is why you combine, this is your weapons, this is how you make them, this is why your hunting.

LINDY HATERS UNITE!!

Of course, I haven't even addressed this article's main source of Lindy hate yet, but I felt the need to tackle this one point by point...

Quote from: Furious

Let me add a couple things to the whole Wii U is tanking thing. First John L needs to know his material before he talks. He makes the Wii U situation look worse than the Vita situation which is not the case. The Wii U is outselling the Vita on a worldwide bases. Yes, In Japan the the Vita outsold the Wii U, but portables do better in Japan, than consoles. The Wii U has also sold more than the PS3 and Xbox 360 did in their first 4 months on the market.... so were those systems tanking as well? Hell, what new system, other than the Wii hasn't tanked at it's launch?

Rebuttal A: We call him "Lindy" 'round these parts.
Rebuttal B: Okay, this paragraph isn't so bad; however, this is a terrible time for Nintendo to "tanking", plus, as Francis said, the Wii did in fact NOT bomb at launch. So, by nature of logic, one would assume that the follow-up to this smashing success of a console would indeed NOT bomb as well. But it did.
Rebuttal C: For whatever reason (call it possibly incorrect intuition), I feel like this entire generation is going to be an uphill battle for all of the console manufacturers; I think gamers are going to pretty much be focusing on one sole console this generation, and I don't think Wii U is it -- the "hard-core" are pretty much the only ones still wanting to purchase a dedicated gaming system, and they sure-as-hell aren't too enthused about Nintendo right now. In the past a slow start might have been a minor step back; in today's market, it's quite possibly deadly.

Quote from: Furious

Next, he blames Iwata, for their mistakes, and in the end, I don't see the mistakes their having. Nintendo's games take a long time to develop for quality purposes. You just have to wait. I would have liked to get games sooner, but if it's not ready, it's not ready. Miyamoto takes forever to make his games. The Nintendo developers have more power than John L gives them credit for.

Rebuttal A: A comma isn't needed before the "for" in the first sentence.
Rebuttal B: Yes, Nintendo's games take a while to develop, but that's no real excuse -- if you don't have enough games to release for your new console, DON'T RELEASE YOUR NEW CONSOLE. Either wait a bit before releasing the system, or have some kick-ass games ready for launch.
Rebuttal C: Yeah, the Nintendo developers have a lot of power, but ONLY to the already-Nintendo-faithful. Another Mario, Pikmin, or Zelda isn't gonna do much to court someone who's already abandoned Nintendo. It just gives the "hard-core" yet another way to accuse the company of making "the same kid games they've been making for 15 years". They're wrong about them being kid games, but they're pretty much correct about everything being a rehash of something they've made before. FOR THE LOVE OF GOD, NINTENDO, GIVE US A NEW IP.

Quote from: Furious

And my last point I want to make is why should Nintendo pander to Western game studios?

Sole Rebuttal: BECAUSE PEOPLE BUY THOSE GAMES, AS DERIVATIVE AND UNIMAGINATIVE AS SOME OF US NINTENDO FANS MAY THINK THEY ARE. I realize that Call of Duty isn't the most exciting thing to most of us on this board (hell, most of us thumb our noses at it), BUT IT SELLS. It's like the concept of cinema; if not for crapfests like Transformers 2, Hollywood studios wouldn't have enough cash to fund more artistically viable films like There Will Be Blood and the like.

Quote from: Furious

Western studios don't support Nintendo because they are afraid of Nintendo's killer Ips. They don't want to compete against Mario, Zelda, and Metroid.

Should Nintendo pay Western developers to bring over their shooters so John L can play them on there? We all know those are his favorite genre. I think Nintendo should do what Nintendo does. Make great games. And at E3 were going to see that.

Rebuttal: Well, the problem here is you act like Lindy's the minority; like most gamers are just waiting to throw their collective dollars at Super Duper Mario Land World Galaxy Sunshine 3D 4 Mii and U. It's the opposite, actually; it's the Western developers that are making the system-sellers. I'm with you -- I prefer the Zeldas and Metroids. But the mass market of today just doesn't, and Nintendo needs to see that.


Okay, rant over. Any thoughts?

EDIT: I want to come in and say I didn't mean to come in here and single out Francis here; it's just I've seen arguments like his all over the 'net, and I felt the need to respond. No hate, just throwing out my opinion.

FjurbanskiApril 08, 2013

I guess the reason I don't think the Wii U needs third party support to be successful is because I just assume that even if it DID have third party support those games wouldn't sell the console anyway.


Think about it. Who says, "Oh, the Wii U has Tomb Raider? Guess I'll buy one now." Especially with current gen 3rd party games. I find it hard to believe that getting current gen multiplats would have helped the Wii U that much, unless their quality were much greater (and apparently only a handful of devs are putting the extra effort into the Wii U version). People would just buy them on the system they already have, rather than buying a new system to play them. Now, if the Wii U were to get a bunch of next gen multiplats, then it might be a different story. But at the same time, most gamers would probably see that the PS4/Nextbox versions had better graphics, etc. and would choose them anyway.


I won't deny that having a robust library of games might make potential buyers more confident in their decision to purchase a Wii U, but ultimately the decision to buy a Wii U will depend on Nintendo's first party offerings.

Furious FrancisApril 08, 2013



Thats, the whole reason Nintendo is developing games like Xenoblade 2, Shin Megami Tensei X Fire Emblem, Bayonetta 2, and The Wonderful 101. To get those gamers who aren't into Nintendo's main franchises as much.

PlugabugzApril 09, 2013

"i had to go to my backup wardrobe".

Jon Lindemann is Diana Ross CONFIRMED.

Glad0sApril 09, 2013

Quote from: Fjurbanski

I guess the reason I don't think the Wii U needs third party support to be successful is because I just assume that even if it DID have third party support those games wouldn't sell the console anyway.

Think about it. Who says, "Oh, the Wii U has Tomb Raider? Guess I'll buy one now." Especially with current gen 3rd party games. I find it hard to believe that getting current gen multiplats would have helped the Wii U that much, unless their quality were much greater (and apparently only a handful of devs are putting the extra effort into the Wii U version). People would just buy them on the system they already have, rather than buying a new system to play them. Now, if the Wii U were to get a bunch of next gen multiplats, then it might be a different story. But at the same time, most gamers would probably see that the PS4/Nextbox versions had better graphics, etc. and would choose them anyway.

Good point. Just adding ports isn't enough to make Wii U succeed. However, I think that if Nintendo could attempt to nail some exclusive deals (something like the Capcom Five all over again, except this time make it good), that could work out mighty well. Heck, they even did that with Bayonetta 2, and that leads me into...

Quote from: Furious

Thats, the whole reason Nintendo is developing games like Xenoblade 2, Shin Megami Tensei X Fire Emblem, Bayonetta 2, and The Wonderful 101. To get those gamers who aren't into Nintendo's main franchises as much.

I see that, but most of those properties are pretty Japan-centric. I don't see throngs of the masses lining up outside of store fronts on day 1 of Shin Megami Tensei X Fire Emblem or The Wonderful 101. All of those games sound great to me, and I'm glad they're coming, but they're kind of serving a minority, albeit a minority that Nintendo hasn't been serving for quite a while. It's a step in the right direction, but it's not quite enough to grab the general public.


As to what would be enough, I...really don't know, although I think a non-Metroid FPS from Retro would be killer on both a critical and commercial standpoint.

CericApril 09, 2013

I think the real reason those are Japan-centric is that well Nintendo has next to now clout with Western developers.

gojiraApril 09, 2013

Quote from: Jonnyboy117

Thanks for the tips. I'll say that a lot of that information is definitely not apparent in the game, and I've played it for a few hours now.

I would also recommend doing the races in order from top to bottom.  The later races seem to assume you've done the earlier ones and have unlocked the mods from those races.  Once I figured that out I had less trouble beating races.

Thanks all the Must Wanted tips! I'm looking forward to playing more of it, armed with all this new knowledge.


How can you not blame Iwata for the company's missteps?  He runs the company.  At the end of the day he's responsible, good or ill.  Nintendo doesn't get along with third parties? Talk to Iwata. Game draught? Iwata.  Overpriced hardware? Iwata.  He's at the top of the totem pole.  You don't think Square Enix isn't blaming Yoichi Wada for their crappy performance?  They are, that's why he's out.  Iwata is a CEO, he's no different.  He's an executive that can be removed if his performance isn't up to snuff (just like Reggie, for that matter).


Also, Don't confuse the sales success of Wii U with the console being a success for YOU.  I'm not saying Nintendo fans won't love Wii U and enjoy the heck out of it; of course they will.  But when we're talking sales, Western developers are driving sales on PS and Xbox, and that's a big chunk of the North American sales pie that Nintendo is inexplicably opting out of, whatever the reason.  I don't understand that at all.

SundoulosApril 11, 2013

I have to agree with Lindy.  Whether or not you could lay all the blame at Iwata's feet, he will ultimately be the person held responsible for Nintendo's success or failure.  I remember all the discussions about him cutting his own salary by 50% in 2011 due to the failures of the 3DS in that year; he certainly seems to acknowledge that others will hold him accountable.  (Yet the 3DS seems to be doing pretty well now.) If the Wii U does not pick up within the next year, I wonder if he will attempt to make a similar gesture.

That being said, I would hate to see Iwata leave simply because I can't help but like him.  Whether or not he has made a number of mistakes, in my mind he's certainly changed the public face of Nintendo to something that's more personable.  You guys in the game enthusiast press may have different feelings about the way things have gone in the last few years, but as a Nintendo-enthusiast end user, I like the Iwata asks articles and Japanese Nintendo directs.

Glad0sApril 12, 2013

Quote from: NWR_Lindy

How can you not blame Iwata for the company's missteps?  He runs the company.  At the end of the day he's responsible, good or ill.  Nintendo doesn't get along with third parties? Talk to Iwata. Game draught? Iwata.  Overpriced hardware? Iwata.  He's at the top of the totem pole.  You don't think Square Enix isn't blaming Yoichi Wada for their crappy performance?  They are, that's why he's out.  Iwata is a CEO, he's no different.  He's an executive that can be removed if his performance isn't up to snuff (just like Reggie, for that matter).


Also, Don't confuse the sales success of Wii U with the console being a success for YOU.  I'm not saying Nintendo fans won't love Wii U and enjoy the heck out of it; of course they will.  But when we're talking sales, Western developers are driving sales on PS and Xbox, and that's a big chunk of the North American sales pie that Nintendo is inexplicably opting out of, whatever the reason.  I don't understand that at all.

Preach it, brother. My thoughts exactly.

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