Wii

North America

Wii Sports Resort

by Zachary Miller - July 29, 2009, 10:44 pm PDT
Total comments: 48

8

Go on, try it. You know you want to.

Wii Sports Resort was announced at E3 in 2008 in conjunction with its accessory, Wii MotionPlus. It was also one of Nintendo’s focuses at E3 2009. Now that it’s finally available, is Wii Sports Resort worth the wait? It most certainly is. Though it could be seen as a high-quality tech demo for the Wii MotionPlus, such a mindset is missing the point. Wii Sports Resort is just plain fun, whether alone or in a group.

The game begins with a surprisingly lengthy video on how to attach the MotionPlus. To me, this was overkill, but to my in-laws (who helped me review the game), the tutorial may be more necessary. After that, your Mii jumps out of an airplane and straight into the action: skydiving! The Remote represents your Mii’s body, and moving the controller in turn moves your Mii in mid-air. You can pitch toward other skydivers and try to link up with them, but after a few minutes, you land on Wuhu Island, where the action really starts. Resort has twelve distinct kinds of games, and each one can be played many ways.

Swordplay best represents the more accurate control afforded by the MotionPlus. You hold the Remote like a sword and go about slicing and dicing your opponent. Press B to enter a defensive stance and move your sword around to block your opponent’s blows. Correctly blocking an attack makes your opponent stumble for a second, during which time you can combo him to death. There are three variations: duel, in which two players try to push each other off a platform; speed slicing, where players compete to see who can slice objects the fastest in the correct direction; and showdown, where you battle dozens of enemy Miis but can only be hit three times. Showdown is by far the most fun, and winning unlocks different locations.

Frisbee is by far my favorite sport in the bunch (probably because I play a lot of Ultimate Frisbee). While it initially takes some getting used to, tossing a virtual Frisbee to a virtual dog quickly becomes second nature, and tilting the Remote this way or that adds slice and fade to your throw. Lifting or lowering the tip of the Remote determines how high and far your Frisbee goes. The goal of the game is to throw your disk at a target, and scoring is based on how close it lands. Popping balloons adds still more points. Frisbee may be the most technical game in the package, with its heavy reliance on tilt and pitch, as well as a horizontal throwing arm, to achieve success. You’ll quickly unlock the other mode, Frisbee Golf (Frolf). In real life, you would toss a Frisbee of varying size toward and into a metal basket. Here, you need only throw your Frisbee through a target zone. Somewhat disappointingly, the Frolf courses are the same as the Golf courses, and they’re not really designed for Frisbee in the first place. Still, it’s a fun mode, and an experienced player can toss a lot of holes-in-one.

Table Tennis succeeds Wii Sport’s original Tennis game, and by and large, it’s the same game. Now, however, you have greater control over the ball’s spin. You can put some really wild spin on the ball, though you still can’t control your character’s movement. As Rockstar’s Table Tennis demonstrated, that might be a good thing. The game’s secondary mode is a contest to see how many balls you can return in a row—knocking down the ball canister earns bonus points. Whacking the server in the face is amusing, too.

Archery may be the most surprising inclusion, but it works beautifully and should be implemented in every Wii Zelda game down the road. You hold the Remote as you would a bow (vertically), and press A to center your view. Hold Z and pull back on the Nunchuk to ready your arrow, then take distance and wind speed into account, and release Z to fire your arrow at the target. Archery is basic, in that the sub-modes only add hazards like wind and moving targets, but these variations prove to be challenging. Archery may require the most practice to become proficient, but it’s very fun and rewarding once you get the hang of it.

There are three water sports, Wakeboarding, Canoeing, and Jet Skiing, and all of them feel more like work than fun. Wakeboarding is not as fun as it could’ve been. You steer by tilting the horizontal Remote left and right, try to get big air over a wave, then pop the Wii Remote upwards to do an automated trick. Make sure the Remote is totally level when you land or you'll crash. Additional difficulties require dodging obstacles. It’s not rocket science, and its simplistic premise didn’t engage me. Canoeing is the most fun of three, but it’s slow-paced and more fun with more people. You hold the Remote in front of you and mime paddle motions to paddle your canoe. Left, right, left, right. The goal is to go an ever-increasing distance in a certain amount of time. Jet Skiing is the most disappointing, but I can see how it could turn into a Wave Race game with some tweaking. You hold the Remote and the Nunchuk in front of you, pointing toward each other. You tilt them both to steer and twist the Remote to get a speed boost. The goal here is to steer through a series of rings within a time limit; smaller rings are worth more points. It’s fun, but the tilting feels off compared to other games—not quite as refined as, say, Wakeboarding. I blame the addition of the Nunchuk, which does not have a gyroscope.

Basketball is fun but could use some refinement. The main game is a 3-point contest where you grab a ball and try to sink it as quickly as you can. It feels like those arcade games where you grab a miniature basketball and toss it into a little basket. It definitely takes a lot of practice to become consistently good at this, and I’m still at a loss as to recommend the best path to success. It’s fun as a multiplayer bout, as is the 3-on-3 mode, where you pass the ball (with A or D-pad) to the A.I. teammates and mimic dribbling to get under the net, then press B and do that overhead toss to try a dunk (yes, your Mii can dunk). There’s very little strategy, aside from knowing when to block a shot attempt, but it’s fun overall.

Air Sports are the most interesting games on the disk, and they will instantly remind you of Pilotwings. They all involve holding the Wii Remote like a paper airplane. We’ve already gone over Skydiving—the goal is to link up with other skydivers and stay in the center of the screen while a camera takes your picture. You are awarded points based on how many skydivers you were able to link up with. Island Flyover puts you in a cockpit and lets you casually fly around the island, trying to find bubbles to unlock new island features. Dogfight sounds cool, but it’s very limited. Two players (and only two players) fly around trying to shoot each other. This would be more fun if the planes were faster and more players were allowed to join in.

Cycling is the worst of the bunch. You move the Remote and Nunchuk alternatively like drum sticks to pedal, leaning them left or right to steer. Pedaling faster makes your Mii go faster, but doing so tires him out; stop pedaling and cruise to recharge your energy, or draft behind another cyclist to recover faster. The leaning doesn’t work as well as it should, so accidental sharp turns are inevitable and annoying. Various courses are available, but with 30 other Miis taking up space on the road, it’s hard to win when you’re juggling your energy level, drafting, and overcorrecting. Cycling just lacks polish and, frankly, a real fun factor. It belongs in Wii Fit instead of Resort.

Golf and Bowling are virtually identical to their Wii Sports counterparts. In fact, Golf recycles much of the original 18-hole course. The new hotness, of course, is that you can very easily add fade/slice to your golf ball and spin to your bowling ball. Bowling is largely unaffected by the changes and remains one of my favorite Wii Sports sports. Golf, however, has taken a hit: fading and slicing are too easily activated by the MotionPlus. One golf problem I was hoping would be corrected is the short putting: gentle motions with the Remote too often result in either a far too strong putt or no response at all. This is a problem with the sensitivity of the accelerometer more than anything else, though.

As a package, Resort's only real annoyance is that it’s constantly recalibrating the MotionPlus accessory. Before almost every game, you’ll be asked to lay down the Remote on a flat surface to calibrate. During games, if you ever find yourself needing to recalibrate (this happens sometimes in Golf and Swordplay), you press Down on the D-pad to go through the recalibration process again. I was surprised how often I had to recalibrate, which was kind of annoying, but in no way game-breaking. If anything, I’m glad the game calibrates itself more often than not enough.

Resort’s production values are right in line with Wii Sports/Play/Fit: bright and colorful, with simple structures and geometry. The water effects are nice, and characters seem to have some ragdoll physics (especially during the Swordplay games). And I love the Frisbee dog. He’s so cute! As always, you gain/lose experience based on how you play, eventually rising to "Pro" status once you hit 1000 points. Stamps are a new addition to the series; in a clear reference to Achievements and Trophies, you are awarded Stamps by doing certain things, like making a 100-pin strike in Bowling or a hole-in-one in Frolf. Unfortunately, the practicality of Stamps is nebulous: they show up on your Wii Message Board and are not communicated to your friends or anywhere else on the Internet. You can’t even forward them to your friends. Thus, their impact is dulled.

I can’t complain too much, though, because Stamps are a throwaway feature of what’s otherwise a very robust and enjoyable collection of games made possible by Wii MotionPlus. It’s my hope that developers take these basic ideas and run with them. We may see a new Wave Race or Pilotwings yet, and maybe LucasArts, after studying Swordplay, will give us a lightsaber Star Wars game worth talking about. As always, more people means more fun—bring your friends over for a party game that’s just as enjoyable, if not more so (for more kinds of people), than Super Smash Bros. Brawl. I was lucky enough to review the game while my in-laws, who are not gamers, were visiting. We played every night, and they loved it. Nintendo is trying to reach the non-gamer audience, and Wii Sports Resort is just the prescription.

Score

Graphics Sound Control Gameplay Lastability Final
8 8 8 9 9 8
Graphics
8

I’ve always liked the Wii Sports/Play/Fit aesthetic, and it’s handled here beautifully. Little touches draw your eye, and the screen is never so busy with detail that you lose focus. This is a perfect example of how less is more.

Sound
8

The music (when present) is upbeat, but the sound effects are the real stars here. The howling of wind, the spinning of a Frisbee, and the buzzing of a propeller blade are all well represented.

Control
8

In most games of the collection, MotionPlus adds an untouchable level of immersion. Even the games that aren’t exciting (like Canoeing) perform extremely well. Golf suffers because of the added control, and Cycling and Jet Skiing doesn’t do much with it. Recalibration is a minor issue, though, especially when you’re in the middle of doing something.

Gameplay
9

Extremely rewarding. Stay away from the sports you find yourself disliking, and there’s nothing to complain about. Flying a plane around the island is awesome and makes you realize that MotionPlus opens the door to many possibilities.

Lastability
9

Resort easily trumps Wii Sports, and even that had serious lastability. More variety, better control, and more game types drum up the replay factor. This will be your go-to party game for years, and it is certainly no slouch for the single player, either.

Final
8

Wii Sports Resort and MotionPlus succeed in proving that the Wii’s motion control dream is true, and it couldn’t be better. Some may see Resort as a glorified tech demo, but that’s missing the point. It’s incredibly fun and inventive, and the games are simple enough that anyone can play and enjoy them.

Summary

Pros
  • Most games control extremely well, especially Swordplay, Frisbee, and Archery
  • MotionPlus brings a new level of control and enjoyment
  • Something for everyone, non-gamers included
  • Watching your Mii dunk a basketball
Cons
  • Constant recalibration
  • Cycling and Jet Skiing are lame ducks
  • Without a way to share them, Stamps are meaningless
Review Page 2: Conclusion

Talkback

BwrJim!July 30, 2009

Wasnt bowling in there again..  I have two questions for you..

1)Define Constant Recalibration
2)IN bowling, do the same strikes work that worked in the last game?  i.e. I had 6 or so strikes that I could almost always make without looking at the Tv.  Does the M+ correct that problem?

Thanks,
Jim

MaxiJuly 30, 2009

Great review Halibred.
I will probably pick this up in the next few days.

BlackNMild2k1July 30, 2009

Quote from: BwrJim!

Wasnt bowling in there again..  I have two questions for you..

1)Define Constant Recalibration
2)IN bowling, do the same strikes work that worked in the last game?  i.e. I had 6 or so strikes that I could almost always make without looking at the Tv.  Does the M+ correct that problem?

Thanks,
Jim

Bowling is different because you can't just hold the wiimote at an angle to get the exact same spin every time.  With the M+ you have to actual put spin on the ball by twisting your wrist during your throwing motion.

NemoJuly 30, 2009

Good review...

just two things bother me:

1) in the last paragraph you say "my in-laws ... where visiting" and it should be "were visiting"
2) I hate it when people call it "frolf" instead of frisbee golf. I have no idea what the official term is. I just think frolf sounds stupid.

Nevertheless, good review.

HypotheliciouslyJuly 30, 2009

The official name is Disc Golf.

Great review. Very diligent.

GKJuly 30, 2009

Quote from: BwrJim!

Wasnt bowling in there again..  I have two questions for you..

1)Define Constant Recalibration

Thanks,
Jim

In some events(I know archery is one for sure), the game will ask you to place the remote face down on a flat surface in order to recalibrate. You can also do this on your own if you thing you're not moving the way you should by pushing plus.

AVJuly 30, 2009

I don't think the calibration controversy of the motion plus is very much over blown. I rarely if ever have problems.

My brother loves cycling, and I think it's brainless waggle and steering is awful.
i tried to get into wake boarding but it's just to brainless and I agree with the review. If I could control the tricks with button presses than I would love the mode.

I enjoy bowling more because of the spin, and golf I think is now playable but still boring as golf is. The 100 pin golf mode is fun to watch the physics.

I agree with this review except for stamps. Achievements and Trophies and now Stamps are for your satisfaction. Showing them off is akin to screaming how big your penis is. Overall stamps, achievements and Trophies are wastes of time regardless of the system. They are neat little ways to extend play time but not a big deal overall. I just don't get why people love over them so much.

NinGurl69 *hugglesJuly 30, 2009

"I just don't get why people love over them so much."

Cuz they don't get patted on the back enough in real life.  I wonder why.

I appreciate this game.  Within 1 console cycle we've gotten 2 generations of physical arcade gaming.  This is win.

PeachylalaJuly 30, 2009

The probablity of another Gerstman review failing at physical activity seems to be around 50%.

Now I'm off to play Pilotwings M+ demo.

PaleMike Gamin, Contributing EditorJuly 30, 2009

I love that the "stamps" are in this game and I don't care that they can't be shared online.  A first party Nintendo game features "achievements".  Maybe that means they won't have too much pride to copy MS in the next console round.

Mop it upJuly 30, 2009

Quote:

In most games of the collection, MotionPlus adds an untouchable level of immersion.

There's that word again. I'm going to take that to mean "precision".

NinGurl69 *hugglesJuly 30, 2009

influence
involvement
feedback
Gerstmann

kraken613July 30, 2009

Quote from: Pale

I love that the "stamps" are in this game and I don't care that they can't be shared online.  A first party Nintendo game features "achievements".  Maybe that means they won't have too much pride to copy MS in the next console round.

Come on Nintendo just put these in all your games and make a cohesive online system without FC's! For the most part your going to be fine because the casual people won't even know its there and won't get online so you don't have to "protect" them.

PaleMike Gamin, Contributing EditorJuly 30, 2009

I'm very confused by what you mean.

NinGurl69 *hugglesJuly 30, 2009

Not happening, and I'm not paying for onrine.

Smash_BrotherJuly 30, 2009

I found the constant recalibration to be a deal-killer for me, and I don't just mean placing the remote on the table but having to aim it at the screen on a regular basis so that it can gauge its location.

I'm curious to see how RS2 plays since it'll be the first game that tries to make good on the promise of proper sword fighting.

NinGurl69 *hugglesJuly 30, 2009

Many Wii game products are played, started, and stopped by pointing at the screen and you call it a problem?  Why, I guess pressing A+B to begin Wii Bowling is a deal-killer for me.  Maybe standing up is a deal-killer for me.  Maybe waving my arms is a deal-killer for me.  Maybe holding a controller is a deal-killer for me!

What the heck are you trying to accomplish in WII SORDS RESORT anyway?  It's a basic kendo sim, not Jet Li's Weekend Kung Fu Ninja Bash.

And from Steak2 accounts, it's another faked implementation of sword movements, less proper than Resort.  But since it's an FPS, you don't have to worry about having to "point back at the screen" every time, cuz it's recalibrating as you aim anyway!  So it's insta-buy huh

NWR_pap64Pedro Hernandez, Contributing WriterJuly 30, 2009

To be perfectly honest, S_B's posts are the ONLY negative comments I've read about the game so it could be just a matter of personal preference. But I am willing to give S_B's comments some validity because the same problem appears in Balance Board enabled games. Circus Star from Majesco forced you to re-calibrate the Balance Board every time you played a mini game, and even when you replayed the same game you STILL had to re-calibrate it.

I suspect the same issue might be present in Resort. Either that or S_B fails. Someone or something is definitely failing and hard.

Patchkid15Patrick Barnett, Associate EditorJuly 30, 2009

I usually have to calibrate at the start of ever 5 or so games, I dont think it is much of an issue seeing how it takes only 10 seconds to do. After the few moments, you are in playing your selected game immediately. Anyone complaining about the calibration, i just dont see where you are coming from because i dont have a huge problem with it

PaleMike Gamin, Contributing EditorJuly 30, 2009

I think they are actually fairly clever with the calibration.

Putting the pointer in the center of the screen and hitting A is fine by me.  I especially like how they did it in archery.  When you push the A button to begin aiming, it assumes the remote is vertical with the one edge facing the screen and goes from there.  Of course, if you don't have it facing like that, it can get kind of confusing.

In the airplane game they just say something like "let's fly" and make you make a motion, thus allowing the game to assume you are holding it correctly and go for there.

These are all relatively clever tricks and I only see developers getting more clever as more games are made.

NWR_pap64Pedro Hernandez, Contributing WriterJuly 30, 2009

So the calibration process is quick? When does the game ask you to put the wii remote down?

ThomasOJuly 30, 2009

The only time I've ever seen the Wii Remote need to be placed down in videos is right before the Skydiving intro. Every other time I've seen it needs to be pointed at the screen, which is all right with me.

As a side note, I'd think that if M+ is being used in LoZWii, calibration could be done whenever the player opens a door (which is often, from what I've seen in TP), or when the player opens a menu.

kraken613July 30, 2009

I played for hours and only went and calabrated it once when I started.... I mean pointing at the screen and pressing A isn't annoying to me... The sensor bar zero point works well for me never really gets out of wack.

NWR_pap64Pedro Hernandez, Contributing WriterJuly 30, 2009

One other question, how about Tiger Woods, Virtua Tennis 09 and Grand Slam Tennis? How do they handle the calibration process?

kraken613July 30, 2009

Tiger Woods you never notice it because you are at the zero point with the remote pointed down and you press A.

PaleMike Gamin, Contributing EditorJuly 30, 2009

Pap, just to be clear, whenever you turn on a new Wiimote in Sports Resort the first thing you have to do is place it face down on a table for about five seconds.

The "tricks" I talked about are used after that.  At any point you can pause and do the set on a table calibration again, but I've never felt the need to have to do that.

I don't play for extremely long sessions though.  Maybe a half hour per sitting, which is what I think this game is great for (from a single player perspective).

NWR_pap64Pedro Hernandez, Contributing WriterJuly 30, 2009

I'm just curious because S_B is the only one so far who has had issues with the calibration process when everybody else seems to be doing just fine.

I am wondering if there's such a thing as a bad calibration process where the player could be doing something wrong, forcing the game to re-calibrate often.

I know for a fact that Balance Board calibration can go wrong if you don't follow the process (I know Balance Board calibration is different from Motion Plus calibration, but both need to be calibrated in order to work, so the processes are important).

NinGurl69 *hugglesJuly 30, 2009

Quote from: pap64

So the calibration process is quick? When does the game ask you to put the wii remote down?

There's two separate things going on.

1)  You put the Wii Remote down, and you literally leave it alone for a couple seconds -- this is similar to stepping off the BB, but takes less time than the BB.  The game only forced me to do it at the beginning.  YOU can pause the game and set the Remote down voluntarily if you feel the motions aren't lining up properly anymore.

2)  You point at the screen (or hold a particular orientation) and press A to begin the event -- this is like clicking a "Yes/No" or "OK/Cancel" popup message on a computer; point, click, and it goes away immediately.  Many events ask you to do this right before each session; it's a quick-fudge calibration.  In comparison, Wii Bowling Ver.1 asks you to hold the Remote upright and press A+B to begin the session, and Archery works similarly (hold straight up, Press A).

These stop-n-go messages probably give Smash a bad itch.

I guess a lot of people think it's fun to make fun of Jeff Gerstmann, but he said Resort is "awesome" on the Giant Bomb podcast.

kraken613July 30, 2009

His video review was really positive too.

NWR_pap64Pedro Hernandez, Contributing WriterJuly 30, 2009

I just want to warn everyone that I don't want to flame SB for being the only one who has issues with this game. I was just curious since I heard a lot of good things about both the game and MotionPlus and want to know what exactly caused the issues SB experienced. So let's not get out of hand. Let's give anyone that doesn't like the game the benefit of the doubt and say that they might change their minds. If they aren't convinced too bad.

Smash_BrotherJuly 30, 2009

Quote from: NinGurl69

Many Wii game products are played, started, and stopped by pointing at the screen and you call it a problem?  Why, I guess pressing A+B to begin Wii Bowling is a deal-killer for me.  Maybe standing up is a deal-killer for me.  Maybe waving my arms is a deal-killer for me.  Maybe holding a controller is a deal-killer for me!

What the heck are you trying to accomplish in WII SORDS RESORT anyway?  It's a basic kendo sim, not Jet Li's Weekend Kung Fu Ninja Bash.

And from Steak2 accounts, it's another faked implementation of sword movements, less proper than Resort.  But since it's an FPS, you don't have to worry about having to "point back at the screen" every time, cuz it's recalibrating as you aim anyway!  So it's insta-buy huh

This is the first time we've had motion control demand that you make preparations to use it. The accelerometer may not be as accurate, but you can just pick up the damn controller and bowl, aim or whatnot (wrist strap advised, but optional).

It had me calibrate the thing 3-4 times within the span of 20 minutes (maybe the one I borrowed was broken). I'm not always going to have a table near me to rest the controller on.

Plus, unless a game has you constantly pointing at the screen anyway, it's going to be extremely flow-breaking to need to stop and point at the screen to calibrate the system on occasion.

One of the reasons the Wii remote is so great is, simply put, that the thing is DAMN low maintenance. The worst you have to do is aim it at the sensor bar and make sure your light sources aren't screwing with it. With WMP, I need to pause occasionally to sit it on a table and I need to aim it at the screen so it can figure out where it is.

There are a lot of audiences that just won't put up with that kind of prep work, blue ocean included. The Wii was an easy sell to all the people I demoed it for because the motion control was easy to use, seamless and worked flawlessly. If I had to be telling people, "Ok, wait, put it face down on the table for a moment..." I think it would detract greatly from the experience.

I'm hoping that developers will find ways of hiding the calibration, but it's still irksome that we went this long with zero calibration required and all of a sudden we need it.

NWR_pap64Pedro Hernandez, Contributing WriterJuly 31, 2009

I think that the more immersive gaming hopes to become the more issues will arise. This is why I believe that Natal will have much worse issues than MotionPlus. I recently played "You're In The Movies" and the process for that is TERRIBLE and doesn't always get the desired result. It tells you to make sure the room is well lit, to wear clothing that doesn't blend with the background, so on and so forth.

In comparison to the MotionPlus calibration process this is quick and easy and the results are accurate.

Just saying that even if the calibration process exist its still better than what we have already seen in other consoles.

Smash_BrotherJuly 31, 2009

Quote from: pap64

Just saying that even if the calibration process exist its still better than what we have already seen in other consoles.

Well, except for what we've already seen on the Wii before WMP.

NWR_pap64Pedro Hernandez, Contributing WriterJuly 31, 2009

Balance Board calibration in some games its annoying as all hell (CIRCUS STAAAAAAAAAR!!!!).

NinGurl69 *hugglesJuly 31, 2009

It suddenly struck me that it's strange the "resting remote" calibration is technically needed at all.  Games like Kororinpa already play fine and recognize the horizontal plane with the existing tech.  Now I'm not sure what Lotion Puss is trying to zero-in on.

WHATS GOING ON

Flames_of_chaosLukasz Balicki, Staff AlumnusJuly 31, 2009

Quote from: pap64

One other question, how about Tiger Woods, Virtua Tennis 09 and Grand Slam Tennis? How do they handle the calibration process?

Before every serve, you point at a circle with your player number.

BTW, Wario Land: Shake It has achievement equivalents, too. Nintendo isn't against them, but doesn't seem interested in encouraging developers to (over)use them.

Or use them in a meaningful way, anyway.

Smash_BrotherJuly 31, 2009

Quote from: NinGurl69

It suddenly struck me that it's strange the "resting remote" calibration is technically needed at all.  Games like Kororinpa already play fine and recognize the horizontal plane with the existing tech.  Now I'm not sure what Lotion Puss is trying to zero-in on.

WHATS GOING ON

That's an excellent point. The accelerometer definitely senses which way is up at all times. Why it couldn't just get a bearing while you're holding the remote still is a mystery. It could even do it while the player doesn't even KNOW it's calibrating.

The game is still decent and I think the tech has promise, I just feel that every additional stipulation to using a piece of tech will alienate that many more people from it. I still love the original Wii Remote because of how simple it is to use. It's a smart piece of technology that I think had more life in it without WMP. It's just that very few devs stepped up to the plate and really did something with it.

SteleJuly 31, 2009

Well the wife and I played the hell out of it Sunday... and Monday... and Tuesday... and a little bit yesterday.

It's loads of fun.  As others have said, the game only forces you to calibrate when you first start it up, or if you perhaps leave it running for 5+ minutes and the wiimote shuts off, then you come back, the first game you play asks you to lie it facedown.

Tiger Woods I don't ever doing any calibration in-game.  I know the game manual said something about placing the Wiimote facedown to re-calibrate if you felt it was out of whack.  But you didn't have to pause or anything.  I think I might have done that if I ever had to take a break and came back and the wiimote had shut down.

Anyway both my wife and I have gotten really into the Swordplay.  And while running the showdown mode we have both started pausing and setting the wiimote down before each round.  Seems like the swinging can really knock it out of whack.  Maybe we're just being overcautious or something.

But I've played through an entire 18 holes of golf and disc golf and never felt like it was out of whack.  So I guess it just depends on the mode and whatever.

True test of the game will probably be when I have my parents over to play.  They're on vacation right now, so in a couple weeks I guess.  But they absolutely love bowling and tennis from the first game.  Curious to see if they will adjust to ping pong in this one and if they will find any of the others interesting.  I'd think they'd enjoy 3-point shootout as our whole family has always played a lot of basketball, but we'll see.

I'm more than satisfied with the purchase for myself though.  Of course after first playing Tiger Woods 10 over a month ago, I was sold on M+. 

Oh and if anyone is wondering, TW10 beats the hell out of WSR golf.  For serious players or casual players either one, TW10 is superior.  WSR keeps the same ridiculous "swing too hard and you randomly hook/slice" BS that Wii Sports had already.  >:(  Dumbest design ever, still.  And the putting... well it's just shitty compared to TW10.  The putting in TW10 is just so amazing, if you play enough you can stop looking at the power meter even.  But WSR golf never has that precision feel to it.

As for disc golf, it's a much closer match.  WSR disc golf might be a bit more challenging.  It's hard to tell how much of it is the limited aiming and difficulty telling how far away from hazards you are vs. how precise the actual throwing motion is measured.  TW10 has the "can't miss" putter disc, but WSR is much easier to hole out on a par 3.  They're both fun in their own way.

CalibanJuly 31, 2009

Quote from: NinGurl69

It suddenly struck me that it's strange the "resting remote" calibration is technically needed at all.  Games like Kororinpa already play fine and recognize the horizontal plane with the existing tech.  Now I'm not sure what Lotion Puss is trying to zero-in on.

WHATS GOING ON

I think I have a clue, but I'm not skilled at writing my thoughts. It involves the point of calibration to which the gyroscope has been set to reset.
What I can say is that it's possible one of the factors that the Wii remote requires to be off hand is so that its internal temperature can return to what the gyroscope might have been calibrated to. I recall from the "Iwata Asks" feature something about temperature oscillation being a problem with having the gyroscope resetting itself.

NinGurl69 *hugglesJuly 31, 2009

That's interesting find.

My idea was M+ needs to set an elevation datum for itself relative to the sensor bar and the player's sitting/standing position.

CalibanJuly 31, 2009

But it's a gyroscope, so wouldn't elevation mean nothing to it? I mean there are no games that take such advantage, IR is pointless. Unless it uses IR for a soft reset, and upside-down Wii remote for a hard reset.

If it's a soft reset then I gather it creates a vector (point of origin is center of gyro, direction and magnitude is based on IR triangulation) for the gyroscope to compare with an original vector created with values at STP... wow if the WM+ really can read its own temperature and pressure I am more than impressed (I am already impressed with its use of MEMS) that we can use such high tech in such a casual manner.

For the hard reset I think the gyroscope just shuts itself off, and uses gravity as a means to reach the original vector at STP.

Based on what I've read about Motion+ and the games that use it, recalibration only requires that the unit be completely still for a couple seconds. Nintendo seems to be saying put it face down on a table because that's the simplest, most straightforward way of making that happen.

I played this extensively with some friends of mine over the past few days and we had a great time with it. Within 20 minutes we knew we were going to spend a ton of time with basketball.

ZapAugust 01, 2009

Fair review. This game is 12 flavors of fun. Some of them you'll want to pig out every day on, the others you'll stick in the back of the freezer for another time. For those, the game presents a mind-blowing twist unprecedented in gameplay history: you'll need to play them more.... in order to learn the controls and get better and better. Some are certainly more fun and more addicting than others, and you can't help but wish for more features (like button tricks for wakeboarding, carrying over wins between kendo games, or different dog catch beaches for example) but if you buy this game you will have fun and smile for a long time to come.

Quote from: pap64

One other question, how about Tiger Woods, Virtua Tennis 09 and Grand Slam Tennis? How do they handle the calibration process?

Tiger Woods - very well
GST - poorly

KDR_11kAugust 02, 2009

Quote from: TheYoungerPlumber

BTW, Wario Land: Shake It has achievement equivalents, too. Nintendo isn't against them, but doesn't seem interested in encouraging developers to (over)use them.

Disaster has 100 archievements.

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Wii Sports Resort Box Art

Genre Sports
Developer Nintendo
Players1 - 4
Controllers

Worldwide Releases

na: Wii Sports Resort
Release Jul 26, 2009
PublisherNintendo
RatingEveryone
jpn: Wii Sports Resort
Release Jun 25, 2009
PublisherNintendo
RatingAll Ages
eu: Wii Sports Resort
Release Jul 24, 2009
PublisherNintendo
Rating7+
aus: Wii Sports Resort
Release Jul 23, 2009
PublisherNintendo
RatingGeneral

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