Roundtable Discussion: PlayStation 4 Unveiling

by Karl Castaneda, Rory Cocker, Michael Cole, J.P. Corbran, Alex Culafi, Andy Goergen, James Jones, Zack Kaplan, Jon Lindemann, Dave Mellert, Jonathan Metts, Zachary Miller, Tyler Ohlew, Neal Ronaghan, and Guillaume Veillette - February 23, 2013, 7:54 am PST
Total comments: 30

What are the staff's thoughts on the impact of Sony's new console?

Few doubted we'd see a console introduced at the high-profile Sony press conference earlier this week. While remaining coy on the price, design, and other specifics, Sony spent the evening's presentation discussion and demonstrating some of the features and capabilities of its newest platform, the PlayStation 4.

The event created no shortage of questions, concerns, and opinions. With these in mind, our staff took some time to discuss the PS4's reveal from a Nintendo-centric perspective.

Alex Culafi, Previews Editor

I saw the whole thing, and I'm wonderfully impressed in several ways.

The console, assuming it's as developer friendly as they say, could put Sony back to where they were during the PS2 era, if not better. With a combination of great graphics (near-photo realism!), easy development, and their movement to make downloads a thing of the past, the Wii U looks... a bit shoddy in comparison. While one could say "You might have to pay 700 dollars to have the PS4 and Vita do what Wii U does" and be totally right, I'm a person who happens to have a Vita and will happen to have a PS4, and the select compatibility for Off-TV Play on Wii U might actually be overshadowed by PS4's nearly off-TV play, depending on how many games utilize it.

If that's the case, we're at the point we were with the Wii. Wii U won't really have the features to stack up, and it won't have the technology; in other words, Nintendo will spend this generation 100 percent reliant on games. While that might not be bad to some, they certainly have a lot to prove to anyone who isn't part of the Nintendo faithful.

Not all was fine and dandy, though. While the new Infamous and Killzone games look very cool, Sony was lacking in the games department. The two best games there were part of established franchises, the new IPs aren't totally convincing to me yet, and closing with a Diablo III port and a previously announced Bungie game was a dire mistake. Also, where's the console itself?

I still need to be convinced in the game department and pricing department somewhat before I purchase, but I think Sony is off to a great start—a start Microsoft and Nintendo might have difficulty catching up to.

Karl Castaneda

The good:

-Self-publish on PSN.

-Knack! That game looks hella sweet.

-The Witness looks interesting.

-Watch Dogs looks great (though not platform exclusive)

The bad:

-No price point probably means 499 US dollars.

-A bunch of non-announcements ("A Final Fantasy game will be coming to PS4... Thankyouverymuch!").

-Speaking of, Square Enix wants to sell us soda, I guess? That was a terrible teaser trailer for what is likely nothing.

-Killzone looks hella boring.

-The pulled a translator out for Ono.

-That Drive Club guy looked like he was going to splooge himself onstage.

Zack Kaplan, Staff Writer

I watched a good chunk of the presentation and found it to be quite dry, like most Sony conferences. I was underwhelmed by the PS4, and am not regretting buying a Wii U. None of the games were that interesting to me; everything was just meh. Also, Killzone looks terribly uninteresting; the only thing that could have been worse would have been Resistance.

Neal Ronaghan, Director

I really dig some of the concepts that Sony talked about it. It's sort of like their social hooks are Miiverse but, you know, the way Sony would do it. However, as we saw with Miiverse and Wii U, I doubt all of those features will make it for launch. I could be wrong, but I expect to see a lot of hype for their social stuff and then see it get berated for a few months and then slowly form into something incredible. Also: Sign me up for using my Vita as a controller for my PS4. While I have concerns over how well it will work (Remote Play from PS3 to Vita is dodgy), it'll be great if it does.

Then they started rattling off games I could care less about. Knack looks fantastic, but other than that, only The Witness and Watch Dogs caught my eye. Both of those games are hitting other platforms. Sony needs to roll out like 2-3 dynamite launch titles for me to even consider getting one close to launch. Then again, I bought a Vita on the strength of Hot Shots Golf, Lumines, and Mutant Blobs Attack. I'm easy.

Zach Miller, Features Editor

I'm basically "meh" on the whole thing. The controller is hideous, BTW. But seriously, Infamous and Killzone? I couldn't care ANY less. I'm going to wait until E3, kids.

James Jones, Senior Editor

I didn't see much (including a console). They spent a lot of time on the "you can play anywhere, on anything," but can I? Really? Can I play an FPS on a tablet? Would I want to?

That entire subject sounded a bit like normal Sony talking points.

I do wonder if they're trying to get to a future where all the processing is done remotely and you just pay for access to the service. They could then sell cheap set-tops. Imagine OnLive but with the backing of a company of Sony's stature.

Zach Miller

I started to wonder if Sony's going to charge a PlayStation Plus-esque subscription fee for all this content streaming and user sharing/uploading.

Jon Lindemann, Contributing Editor

I'm sure they'll paywall at least parts of it, or charge for premium services like expanded cloud storage. And you know what? I'm OK with that. The one good thing about Sony is that you pay top dollar for their products and services, but you get a lot in return. Microsoft gives you less for more, and Nintendo gives you less for less.

Overall, I was neutral on the presentation. I'm a Killzone fan, so Shadow Fall pleased me, and the Gaikai streaming to Vita is awesome, but the games shown were very underwhelming. Nothing wowed me. No mention of Gran Turismo 6, and the Square Enix and Capcom videos were yawn city. No mention of the mysterious Last Guardian either.

And am I the only one who was disappointed by so many games being released on both PS3 and PS4? That made many titles feel less exclusive and "next-gen."

The controller was a sensible extension of the DualShock 3, but nothing groundbreaking. Social sharing is cool and welcomed. What, no Home for PS4? COME ON.

Sony checked a lot of boxes for me with this presentation, but didn't knock my socks off. On the other hand, a lot of what they said made sense and didn't raise any red flags with me. So, neutral all around.

J.P. Corbran, Community Manager

We've got to remember that Sony is likely holding back a fair amount, especially in the way of software, for their E3 presentation. The game lineup today left a lot to be desired, but Sony's almost certainly saving its best stuff for June. While I'm still not sure about the prospect of streaming games, the implications it will have on the Vita have me cautiously excited. The vision Sony laid out sounds a lot like the Wii U's Off-TV Play, and while it's significantly more expensive than Nintendo's implementation, and likely won't work quite as well, it's a feature I'm very interested in, and will be a significant factor in my decision of whether or not I buy the system.

Rory Cocker, Europe Correspondent

Watching the Killzone trailer, I was hoping it would be a new IP.

It made me laugh how they spent like 15 minutes talking about the new hardware allowing developers to more easily implement their ideas and free their imaginations, how innovative and mind blowing PS4 games would be, then the first thing they showed was a linear, scripted FPS with quick time events.

Meet the new gen, same as the old gen.

Still, dat 8GB DDR5 RAM. Sony don't skimp on specs, I'll give 'em that!

Dave Mellert, Contributing Editor

I think the story of the next gen is going to be the system RAM. The graphical differences won't be obvious per se, but having huge open spaces with varied textures, a ton of AI, and minimal load times is going to be awesome.

Jonathan Metts, Contributing Editor

Based on what we heard, a major chunk of that RAM will be reserved for system features.

Andy Goergen, Reviews Editor

I don't have any real intention of buying another game console anytime soon, but based on what I've seen so far, and from what I've seen from the current gen HD consoles, I will definitely be choosing a PS4 over the next Xbox. I don't like how Microsoft has converted their console dashboard into ad space, and I don't like being forced to pay for basic online features like online play, Netflix, and HBO GO. It still remains to be seen how Sony and Microsoft will shape their Plus and Live services in the next generation of consoles, but if what we have today is any indication, Sony's service offering will be a much better bang for your buck.

Guillaume Veillette, Podcast Editor

My backlog has made me immune to console hype, and I've got so much invested in PSN already, including many games I still haven't played yet, that if I'm going to invest in a new Sony machine, it's probably going to be a slim PS3 once my current one kicks the bucket.

Add to that the fact that I'm not that enamored with Naughty Dog, that I have had enough of Infamous, that Japan Studio's games really don't resonate with me even though they look like they should, and I'm just not in the market for a PS4.

Some of the streaming features are impressive, but impractical in my case, given my download cap, and the fact that I haven't found a free Wi-Fi access point that allows me to download games on the eShop, or even load web pages fast. I'm very skeptical on that one. 

What made me take the plunge last generation was Fallout 3, and PSN games like Flower pushed me towards a PS3 instead of a 360. I've long ago realized the mistake I made: I really should have invested in a PC instead.

Michael "TYP" Cole, Senior Editor

Sony talks a good game, as always, but it really comes down to the games and price point. I wouldn't expect Sony to showcase games I care about as part of this sort of presentation, so the jury's out on that. But there are plenty of PS3 games I want to play still. I doubt this console will be in impule purchase-pricing territory for me though—$350 for Wii U was pushing it and I'd expect PS4 to be $100 higher.

Realistically I will neither buy Sony nor Microsoft consoles at launch. It's a matter of how soon afterward and which one.

Jon Lindemann

Yeah, my guess is a $400 basic and a $500 deluxe version that includes a year of PS Plus.

Dave Mellert

Final thought: No way I am buying one at launch. I only do that with Nintendo systems and, even then, only rarely. But I think that the huge increase in fast RAM is going to open up game *design* in a way that has never really been possible. I am looking forward to full-scale battles with hundreds of enemies acting independently on a richly detailed battlefield.

Tyler Ohlew, Staff Writer

The PS4 is a reminder that not only is the industry heading in a direction I have little taste for, but so is the audience. The excitement for sharing video, cloud saves, and content streaming are not interests or priorities of mine.

This isn't a Sony versus Nintendo thing, it's a "where do my tastes align best" thing. Miiverse is the extent to which my interest in communicating with a broader audience extend. I don't want to watch someone play a game, or share 10 seconds of glitches in whatever Bethesda Softworks has in store.

Does the PS4 live or die on these capabilities? Absolutely not. But, judging from this presentation, those are the facets of the hardware Sony wishes to tout. Games are obviously important, but aside from Deep Down, nothing grabbed my interest.

I look forward to Sony showing off the PS4's library of games. That's when I can better gauge my own interest.

Jon Lindemann

At the end of the day PS4 is still going to be a video game machine, whether or not you share something to Twitter, save a game in the cloud, watch something on Netflix, or stream a PS3 game. All of this stuff is optional for gamers, and pushed by Sony only to check the check boxes of the hot stuff of the moment. Consoles are expected to do much more than "just play games," so Sony has to let the public know that it's doing that.

Tyler Ohlew

If you're referring to me, I make it known that my interest in the PS4 will be gauged when Sony shows more games. As it stands, it hasn't shown me anything yet. Are we judging the PS4's potential, or what was shown? Based off that presentation, I'm no more or less interested. Just pointing out I'm indifferent to Sony's ideas of socializing.

Alex Culafi

I know that some of us have way more or way less excitement than others, but I think the really interesting question is whether technology/development ease opens up more new ways to play than a unique control method (or if it's the other way around). Assuming PS4 fulfills its promises about development ease and it picks up in the way I hope, I think there's a good chance that the new traditional console generation will out-innovate Nintendo.

Jon Lindemann

What I think is huge is that Sony is openly embracing free-to-play as a business model. It's out there actively courting F2P games/developers. Microsoft and Nintendo haven't done that, and it's a huge part of the market now.

Images

Talkback

TanookisuitFebruary 23, 2013

Nice piece, guys!


Knack did seem like an interesting concept, but I'm not convinced that the gameplay is as cool as the concept.  That little bit they played remotely on a Vita?  Ugly as sin.  Gray hallways.  Fun.


The opening presentation had me excited, but I saw nothing imaginative in the games they chose to show.

MrPhishfoodFebruary 23, 2013

I didn't expect Sony to do anything revolutionary and I honestly don't think they need to change much. They'll still find much success in Asia and Europe but the question is how will they usurp Microsoft's leading position in the Americas.

Retro DeckadesFebruary 23, 2013

"But I think that the huge increase in fast RAM is going to open up game *design* in a way that has never really been possible. I am looking forward to full-scale battles with hundreds of enemies acting independently on a richly detailed battlefield."

This sounds like it could be quite troubling. Wouldn't designing such games cost a lot more money? Is this going to contribute to inflating the price of game development? If so, is that still considered being developer friendly?

broodwarsFebruary 23, 2013

I'll save most of my thoughts on the conference for tonight's podcast recording, but suffice it to say Sony successfully managed to convince me not to buy a PS4.  No backwards compatibility for my retail OR digital games = no buy, at least at full price at launch.  I want no part in any of that constantly-online, constantly eating your online bandwidth B.S., and nothing Sony showed was anything that would get me to buy a PS4.

FjurbanskiFebruary 23, 2013

Yeah, the no backwards compatibility for digital games is really making me angry. As cumbersome as Nintendo's methods were, at least the let me transfer everything to the Wii U. And this is a great opportunity for Microsoft to come out and say, "We'll let you transfer/download all your xbl arcade games for free", and win some gamer's hearts. I suppose they have no choice since they're moving away from the Cell, but still.


As for the conference, it was ok. Like you guys said, they checked a lot of boxes. The games were a big problem for me though. The new ones looked fake (Capcom's game), I don't care about Killzone, and the best looking games are coming out for the current gen anyway (watch dogs, destiny).


And ultimately, I'm not that interested in this upcoming gen because we're just gonna keep playing the same games, with the same controls, and the same corridor shooters. Bethesda's games will still be buggy messes because they bite off more than they can chew, Activision and EA will still annualize everything and come up with more elaborate ways to get money out of you, and only a handful of games will be anything truly special.


Sure, I'll get excited about certain games, because I love certain franchises. But for the industry as a whole? Even if you give me all the RAM in the world, I can't get excited about the next step the industry is taking when it's just a prettier version of what we've done before.

RazorkidFebruary 23, 2013

Like Guillaume, my backlog has made me immune to console launch hype.  The only reason why I've come back to console gaming after Gamecube was the Wii and WiiU's unique ways of playing backed by Nintendo's software.  I don't know if it's diminishing returns with graphics or the fact that I have so many games yet to play that span the last 3-4 years, but I'm quite content with my PS3.  Despite some solid features, I forsee myself picking up a PS4 in about 5-6 years for the exclusives.  My PC, WiiU and 3DS are more than enough to get me through this next generation.

TrueNerdFebruary 23, 2013

The unveiling conference was just another unveiling conference. Until I see actual games doing things truly not possible on the PS3, I really don't care about much of it. The lack of backwards compatibility sucks. BUT, for me, all Sony has to do is remind us that they have a much larger (and I'd argue much better) stable of 1st and 2nd party developers that will only make games for their platforms than Microsoft does. Hopefully devs like Sucker Punch, Naughty Dog, and Insomniac do what they did the last two generations and create new IPs for this generation and everyone else takes their cue from them. Still, it'll be at least 2015 and a price drop or two before I pick up a PS4. So many games from this generation I haven't even played yet.

mudjahFebruary 23, 2013

My first console as a kid was an atari pong machine, then it was the vic-20 (commodore) and after that the c-64 and so the years go by...


But I am still very exited everytime a major console launches, (except xboxes, i just don't buy those).. and I usually pick them up after a year or so when prices have dropped and I have worked myself through the massive backlog from the generation before. But...


The ps4 left me very uninspired, I feel its nothing new about it, this kind of hd graphics we allready seen on good PCs. The media sharing just seem stupid to me, maybe since I am not really part of the youtube-generation. And facebook twitter-like integration is to me the same... why share this? My hobby? My preccious private time waster?


I think the wiiU seems a more visionary console, I am just sorry nintendo couldnt bother stuffing more horsepower in it. After all, throughout my life as a gamer its the visionary and new, and exciting stuff thats been driving it all.


Maybe Im just too old to care, after all, my first modem had me dial a number on the telephone and then put the phone down on on the modems microphone so I could download that chess game, and after two hours waiting, well it sucked.


I want newer things, like nintendo newer.

Pixelated PixiesFebruary 23, 2013

I thought the 'Playstation Meeting' offered a good balance. Getting Mark Cerny to come out and explain in broad terms what the goal was when designing an architecture for the PS4, and what this would mean for gamers and developers, was a great way to kick things off. Knack looked great, having Bungie on stage was smart (if underwhelming), and I thought Deep Down looked incredible.

Oddly it was features like the touted sleep mode and the streaming tools that were the most interesting aspects of the presentation for me. I'm definitely excited to hear more in the coming months.

I have not yet decided which console I'm going to go with in the next generation. I've owned Nintendo and Microsoft consoles in the past but never a Sony one. After this presentation I'm certainly open to the idea.

*
On an unrelated note. Just so I'm clear, when people say 'I could care less' do they actually mean 'I couldn't care less'? This has always confused me, because saying 'I could care less' means that you actually do care about the thing you're talking about, if only a little. It's fine if that's what people mean when they use that statement, but it strikes me as an odd way to express mild interest.

Luigi DudeFebruary 23, 2013

To me the conference pretty much shows Sony learned nothing from the PS3 launch disaster.  As last gen showed, having the best graphics doesn't mean much if your system ends up costing over $500 to achieve it.  The Vita already showed that repeating the same mistakes your previous console did can have fatal results.

Sony seems to think there's a large audience of gamers out there willing to pay high prices for the most powerful consoles possible, but ignores the fact they've been proven wrong three times now.  People don't want to pay over $250 for a handheld gaming system and they don't want to spend over $500 for a console.  This is a fact Sony just can't seem to learn.

syn4aptikDave Mellert, Associate EditorFebruary 23, 2013

Quote from: Retro

"But I think that the huge increase in fast RAM is going to open up game *design* in a way that has never really been possible. I am looking forward to full-scale battles with hundreds of enemies acting independently on a richly detailed battlefield."

This sounds like it could be quite troubling. Wouldn't designing such games cost a lot more money? Is this going to contribute to inflating the price of game development? If so, is that still considered being developer friendly?

Why would designing the games cost more money? I am talking about memory budgets and the limitations that they create, not monetary budgets. The only possible increase in cost is in a possible increase in art assets per game, but I am not asking for a greater variety of art in total, just on the screen at the same time.

pokepal148February 23, 2013

sony has officially destroyed the only thing they still make money on at this rate

Quote from: broodwars

I'll save most of my thoughts on the conference for tonight's podcast recording, but suffice it to say Sony successfully managed to convince me not to buy a PS4.  No backwards compatibility for my retail OR digital games = no buy, at least at full price at launch.  I want no part in any of that constantly-online, constantly eating your online bandwidth B.S., and nothing Sony showed was anything that would get me to buy a PS4.

i shamelessly bumped the thread i destroyed in the funhouse
mention it now

Pixelated PixiesFebruary 23, 2013

Quote from: Luigi

To me the conference pretty much shows Sony learned nothing from the PS3 launch disaster.  As last gen showed, having the best graphics doesn't mean much if your system ends up costing over $500 to achieve it.


Do you know something I don't? Let's not criticise Sony for overpricing something which they haven't yet publicly priced.

I admit that the inclusion of 8GB of ram suggests that it's going to be a pretty capable system (and perhaps even an expensive one to build), but that doesn't preclude Sony from learning lessons from the previous generation and pricing it aggressively. I know next to nothing about hardware specifications, but I would have thought that having a more standardised architecture, as opposed to the core processor seen the PS3, would go some way towards lessening costs.

Most report guesstimates seem to think the PS4 will come in at around $400. Which, given the price of the Wii U, I don't see as being an exorbitant amount. We'll have to wait and see; but the Sony on display during the press conference seemed to be much more humble than the company who in 2005 expected people to get a second job in order to purchase their console.

TJ SpykeFebruary 23, 2013

The most reliable reports say $430-$530 for the PS4, which is too high.

Pixelated PixiesFebruary 23, 2013

I agree with you that anything that's closer to $500 is too expensive. Then again, I think the Wii U is overpriced for what it offers at $350 (especially when compared to the value of a 360 or PS3). Console manufacturers know that they can afford to charge more for new tech when it launches, it would bad business not to. I just think it's a little premature to decry Sony for not learning anything in the last 8 years given that there's still so much we don't know about the platform.

Fun NWR Trivia: We used to call this kind of feature a "Blah Blah Blah". Don't think we've used that designation in a few years, though.

AdrockFebruary 24, 2013

Quote from: Luigi

To me the conference pretty much shows Sony learned nothing from the PS3 launch disaster.

To Sony's credit, they're pretty much using off the shelf PC parts in PS4 which gives them more bang for their buck and is significantly more developer-friendly than Cell could have ever hoped to be. They learned something though this presents its own problems. If PC becomes the lead platform for 3rd party games, that could hurt Sony. Even I would consider playing on PC if it saved me the cost of an entire console, at least until it became far more affordable. I suppose it's better to get those games on PS4 than not have them at all which is a big problem for Wii U.

TeaHeeFebruary 24, 2013

Sony has an uphill battle in the US.  They need to convince Xbox owners to switch to their system or buy it along with an Xbox.  I don't think this press conference did a lot to convince people to drop their Live accounts and friends lists and make the jump.  To me all they have done is make a gaming a little prettier, and yes, AI will also improve, but I ma relatively confident the 720 will match it in all the ways that count.


Now, this isn't to say that Microsoft won't screw up with their console (like no used games) and piss of their fan base, but that has little to do with this conference and more to do about the next one.


I also feel that if Nintendo can just get some games out that show some real innovation, they will be fine. 


Wow, I have a lot more thoughts, but I am so tired I can't think straight, so POST!

CericFebruary 24, 2013

In the end the PS4 looks like a QoL upgrade.  Which it would be IF it had full Backward Compatibility.  There are a lot of gripes that are being addressed and they made it a point to show that. 

I know a LOT of gamers are Hermit Gamers.  This is my past time and I don't want anyone to share it with me.  Then they are the people who want to show and share their accomplishments with the world.  I honestly don't think building in the ability share is DOOOOOM. 

TJ SpykeFebruary 24, 2013

I think the ability show what you are playing is a niche feature at best. Interesting that it has it, but very few people will ever use it (I would guess MAYBE 1% of PS4 owners) and not something the average gamer will use or have any interest in. I am sure those that do use it will do it a lot, but it's nowhere near as important as Sony thinks it will be (hell, they have a button the DualShock 4 dedicated just for it).

house3136February 24, 2013

I look at the gaming landscape as smartphone/tablet gaming at one end and PC gaming at the other, with Wii U, Nextbox, and PS4 in between. Developers having the ease to port PC games to PS4 is great, but are they exclusive; and will it be enough to drive PC gamers to PS4? Multiplatform PC games today are held back by console limitations because consoles are the lead development platforms. Having 8gigs of GDDR5 is great, but it doesn’t make Microsoft and Nintendo irrelevant. It comes down to what platforms have the install bases that are buying the games. At the end of the day, it comes down to what system(s) are selling and the ability of the platform (and of course duffle bags full of cash.)

People already aren’t running out to buy Vita because you can play PS3 quality games on the platform, and I don’t think it will be any different with PS4. For those who are ready to make the investment, great, but it’s not the mainstream. Would people buy run out to buy 3DS if you could get Fire Emblem: Awakening, Luigi’s Mansion, Animal Crossing, and Mario and Luigi: Dream Team on Wii U? Is investing $150-200 worth having the ability to play games you already own, just on the go? For some, absolutely, for others, no. I hope Sony, Microsoft, and Nintendo all flourish in this next generation of gaming because that’s the environment that creates games that I want to play. It will be interesting to see how far PS4 goes once it has a price on store shelves, and games that have actually be evaluated.

Pixelated PixiesFebruary 24, 2013

Quote from: house3136

Is investing $150-200 worth having the ability to play games you already own, just on the go? For some, absolutely, for others, no.


That's true. I've heard quite a few people feign surprise that Sony would expect people to spend so much money on a PS4 and Vita. That's the thing though, Sony don't expect this feature to sell either system. What it does do though is allow the Vita to access a larger catalogue of games, which is much needed given it's current state. It, therefore, serves a dual purpose. It allows Sony to pretend like they have a feature which is equivalent to the Wii U Gamepad and it also gives Vita and PS4 owners a cool feature which no other platform is offering (in the form of actual remote play). I think it's a very smart move (one that I wish Nintendo would steal). It may not sell either platform but it does add value for those who are set up to take advantage of it and it gives Sony the ability to tick another box.

As I said in this, the Vita connectivity was the most interesting part of the presentation for me. If I'm going to be deciding between a PS4 or a 720, the Vita stuff is going to be a huge plus in Sony's column.

Kytim89February 24, 2013

I am not impressed by anything that Sony has to offer. If I were to express how I feel about their presentation then I would put it like this: If I were an investor in their company I would run, not walk, away from that corporation. All Sony has become is a more expensive version of Nintendo. They expect me to pay well over $600.00 for a PS4 and Vita to do something that cost me much cheaper with the Wii U.

Pixelated PixiesFebruary 24, 2013

Quote from: Kytim89

I am not impressed by anything that Sony has to offer. If I were to express how I feel about their presentation then I would put it like this: If I were an investor in their company I would run, not walk, away from that corporation. All Sony has become is a more expensive version of Nintendo. They expect me to pay well over $600.00 for a PS4 and Vita to do something that cost me much cheaper with the Wii U.


lmao, you guys crack me up sometimes.

Eien1239February 24, 2013

Well the 3ds can play along side the WiiU (MH3U) so if nintendo wanted to make the 3ds a controller they can, problem is three screens is going to be convoluted. Also I doubt most devs will use the power in innovate ways if this generation is any indication.

Ron-FFebruary 24, 2013

I was left underwhelmed by the Sony conference. They are offering a upper midrange gaming PC for, supposedly, a cheap price. So far so good, but the fact is the PS4 offers a barren ecosystem. Very few exclusive games will be initially available and it is pretty clear that near all third party titles will be multi-platform, many of them also playable on the ps3. Considering this, why should anyone upgrade?


Unlike the competitors' products, the PS4 is unable to play games from previous generations and thus its game library will be very limited at least for a year after the release. One may wonder why this is important as most of the old consoles were released in a similar manner. Well, the gaming space have changed a lot in the last few years. In previous generations' transitions there was a huge graphical improvement (or controller alternative in the case of the Wii). As much as the so called graphic whores will love to protest, there isn't a huge leap this time. To a public that is pretty much comfortable playing on the iPad, I suspect the ps3 is good enough.


Finally, many customers may reject the idea of buying a modified PC that can only run a few titles and go for a real PC, especially if Valve actually release the fabled SteamBox for a competitive price.

pokepal148February 24, 2013

if the steam box looks better then that piston thing im biting

Ian SaneFebruary 25, 2013

I wasn't really impressed by I wasn't disappointed either.  It was pretty much exactly what I expected.  There was nothing that made me think "hmmm, I don't know about this."  I don't care about the sharing or social element of it but that's not something I have to use and Miiverse is equally unappealing to me.  The price is probably going to be high but Sony had to make a follow-up to the PS3 so obviously the hardware jump had to be big enough to justify a new system.  The Wii was a major exception and no other successful system had not provided some sort of noticable hardware boost.

My biggest fear was that Nintendo would stick with last gen hardware again and the PS4 reveal just confirmed those negative feelings.  I know what to expect with a Nintendo console that's a generation behind and I'm not interested in going through that again.  The Wii U seems to better match the PS3 than the PS4 and that's just ridiculously short sighted.

One thing to note about Vita integration, though it will obviously not be as widespread as the Wii U Gamepad, Sony is providing that as an OPTION while Nintendo forces you to pay for it, whether you care about it or not.  If the Gamepad was an optional accessory, I would not buy one because I don't care about it and do not expect much from it in the future (and if it does deliver, I can buy one later).  Nintendo wants it to be standard but I don't consider it to be generic enough to make sense as a standard.  To me it's like Nintendo forcing you to buy a Super Scope with the Super Nintendo.  Now Sony is forcing you to pay for the EyeToy technology and MS will almost certainly make you pay for Kinect, so this is a rather annoying new trend in the console industry.

For games it looks like more of the same but what did Nintendo give us?  NSMB U.  Uh, yeah, this bullshit has infested the industry in general.  I don't expect any of the big three to really innovate in a meaningful way.  I figure some indy dev will drive the new trends as the big guns have become too safe and sterile.  Some new IP will catch on out of nowhere and the copycats will follow.

AdrockFebruary 25, 2013

I'd rather be "forced" to buy a controller with a screen on it than a camera. One of those, if nothing else, acts as an actual game controller and the other potentially broadcast me across the world walking around my living room without pants. Guess which is which.

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