Wii

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Metroid Prime 3: Corruption

by Jonathan Metts - September 3, 2007, 11:16 am PDT
Total comments: 105

9.5

Could this game be the best in the series? The best of what series?

"Nintendo's Epic Trilogy Concludes…" And so it does. Corruption may fall right into the middle of the overall Metroid timeline, but it is also certainly the conclusion of the Metroid Prime games and their Phazon saga. Prior to its release, many fans (including myself) wondered if Retro Studios might be veering too far into the first-person shooter genre, compromising some of the adventure elements that made the Prime games so unusual and compelling. The answer there is a resounding "no". There was also some measure of worry about the game's story and presentation, what with the extended dialogue scenes, introduction of voice acting, added control of Samus's ship, and involvement of new bounty hunter characters. Those fears, too, will vanish after the first hour of the game, as nearly all of the game after that introductory sequence is presented in the same way as the first two Metroid Prime games.

However, a few things dawned on me as I played through this final chapter in Retro's saga. Elements such as voice acting have been around in limited form since Super Metroid. Extended dialogue (in text) was done years ago in Metroid Fusion. The other bounty hunters turn out to be not such a big deal after all, because Samus can't really interact with them in complex way without speaking herself. But if you look at the major presentation differences between the 2D Metroid games and Retro's Prime games, the biggest one by far is the use of scanning to deliver information about the worlds, characters, and plots. Of course, this mechanic was introduced back in the first Metroid Prime game, and that made me realize just how much Retro Studios was already expanding the Metroid universe back in 2001. From the very start, this untested development studio was bold enough to create a new planet for Samus to explore, to develop an extensive back story for the game that elaborated and greatly expanded the series canon, and to devise a new force of evil that could not be contained to a single game. With their second game, Retro introduced the idea of limited beam weapon ammunition, created entirely new upgrade abilities that wouldn't even make sense in two dimensions, and added direct interactions with other living, sentient beings. By comparison, the changes introduced in Corruption are no more dramatic or important; they are incremental, natural progressions of what Retro Studios was already doing.

Now, the most interesting thing I realized when viewing this trilogy as a whole and recognizing all the cumulative changes to the original 2D games is that Metroid Prime could now be viewed as a parallel series, inspired by the main Metroid games but quite separate. Corruption, because it has added its own deviations in addition to those inherited from the previous two Prime games, is particularly unrecognizable as a Metroid game. That is to say, it is still based upon the core ideas of exploratory gameplay and expandable character abilities, but otherwise the links to Super Metroid and its ilk are quite superficial. In my mind, the Metroid Prime series is now as distinct from the Metroid games as are the last decade of Castlevania games. This is not to attack in any way the quality of the Prime series; I just find it fascinating that I can now think of, and defend, the Prime series as being largely distinct from the not-Prime series. The point is simply that Retro Studios should be given credit not just for updating a beloved franchise in 3D, not just for providing the most beautiful and immersive games across two Nintendo consoles, but for creating a unique and original property that goes far beyond the source material. The Metroid Prime games deserve to stand on their own merits and not be endlessly compared to the original series.

With all that out of the way, let me say that Corruption is a brilliant game and easily the best reason to own a Wii for anyone who wants more out of the system than just bowling or tennis. The new control method is phenomenal, and I would argue that it is superior to both the dual analog setup and the mouse/keyboard setup used in most other first-person games. It's just as responsive, and yet more natural than those other methods because you are literally pointing your hand to the spot you want to shoot. The button layout is very thoughtful (and partially customizable). Retro Studios made the smart choice of stacking your beam upgrades, which both simplifies the controls and eliminates frequent beam switching as a minor annoyance from the previous two games. The addition of a Spring Ball-like hop is also very welcome, as it slightly speeds up the pace of Morph Ball puzzles. On the subject of pacing, the only step backwards in the entire game is with the loading times between rooms. Maybe it's due to the larger disc size of Wii games, but sometimes you'll be left waiting for ten seconds before the next door will open, and it can be distracting. Other times, doors will open instantly, so it definitely depends on the size of the area you're in and the one you're headed into.

Blamed on the early demos and most of the screenshots released by Nintendo, you couldn't be blamed for thinking that Corruption looks exactly the same as its predecessors. Seeing the final version in motion is a different matter. There are tons of subtle (and occasionally not so subtle) touches that would never be possible on GameCube hardware, while the new widescreen option is a great feature for those who can use it. Corruption obviously can't compete with Xbox 360 and PS3 games on technical terms, but Retro Studios has come through yet again with stellar art direction that makes you completely forget about the Wii's technical limitations. One of the most amazing things about all three Metroid Prime games is that they don't really recycle art. Every room in every game –hundreds in all—looks different or has unique elements that make it visually distinct from the surrounding rooms. This accomplishment is even more pronounced in Corruption. The environments are so easily recognizable that I rarely had to use the in-game map to get around, except in one level where the map is broken into several chunks connected by long railways that branch off in multiple directions.

One thing almost universally loathed in the first two Prime games is the dreaded "fetch quest". This was a lame attempt to make the game longer by forcing you to backtrack across the entire game, looking for items with no effect except to unlock the final boss area. Thankfully, Corruption's variation of the fetch quest is dramatically streamlined, and depending on how you play the game throughout, you may not have to backtrack at all. Not only is it possible to find all of the fetch items in the course of normal exploration, but you can actually use these pseudo-keys in any order, and some of them are optional. You can even partially complete the sequence to come back later to finish it. In other words, the required fetch quest is now much more flexible, and it actually feels like a valid and enjoyable part of the game.

One last thing I have to praise is the level of originality in the new upgrades for Samus. As loyal readers may know, I criticized the otherwise brilliant Metroid Fusion because it did so little to capitalize on the Samus character's development with new gameplay additions. Nintendo spliced our heroine's DNA with that of her greatest nemesis, and the only truly new upgrade to come out of that unholy union was… Diffusion Missiles. Retro Studios has done far, far better with backing up Samus's corruption by Phazon with several cool new abilities that significantly change how the game is played. One or two of the upgrades still feel like glorified keys, but all of them at least have some odd combat utilities if you experiment enough. Corruption even revives and tweaks a couple of lousy abilities from past Metroid games, converting them into surprisingly fun and interesting upgrades.

I won't bother to offer consumer-level advice for a game of this caliber. You either own the game already or should be strongly considering it due to peer pressure and/or critical consensus. Metroid Prime 3: Corruption is a true gamer's game, a lovingly crafted science-fiction magnum opus, a showcase title not only for excellent motion controls but also stunning artwork that rivals anything in gaming. Play it, love it, and start dreaming of the next project from Retro Studios, whatever it may be.

Score

Graphics Sound Control Gameplay Lastability Final
9.5 9.5 10 10 8 9.5
Graphics
9.5

It doesn't get much better than this on Wii. Corruption looks like its GameCube predecessors on a fundamental level, but now there are widescreen mode, bloom lighting, particle effects, better textures, and more intricate models. More importantly, the art design is just as insane as you'd expect from Retro Studios, showcasing strange architecture and mixing organic natural areas with more sci-fi motifs than ever. It's a beautiful game, and that goes far beyond its technical accomplishments.

Sound
9.5

An excellent soundtrack creates moods for every situation; when Retro wants you to feel creeped out, the music has a way of making that happen. Many songs use 2001-esque wordless vocalizations for an authentic sci-fi touch. This may be one of the most extensive uses of voice acting in any Nintendo game so far, but the quality is great, and the writing for the actors is believable and fitting.

Control
10

Yes, this is the best way to control first-person games on any platform. A few other Wii games have attempted a similar setup, but Corruption is the first game to nail it. Other gesture controls are fun and immersive; I never had any problem with them. The limited button customization and sensitivity adjustments are highly welcome.

Gameplay
10

Corruption is similar to Metroid Fusion in that you are always being given missions by another character, and this helps to push you forward and not get too lost. Unlike Fusion, this game never locks you out of other areas, so you can explore freely at any time, and there are many reasons to do so. The shooting elements are better than ever, but they do not take over the game or make it feel like less of an adventure. The new upgrades are fantastic, even if a couple of them aren't used enough.

Lastability
8

Corruption is satisfying, but not remarkably long. (I finished in 17 hours with 100% item completion.) There are two harder difficulty levels, and the quest for bonus credits to unlock art and music may actually get you to play through the game twice.

Final
9.5

Corruption isn't a game made for everyone, but it is made for anyone reading this review. If we could make four or five clones of every person at Retro Studios and send them out to work on different projects of the same quality, Wii really would be catering to core gamers as much as it is to the casual market. This is a must-play adventure that finally shows what the Wii hardware and controllers can really do. More than that, it's a culmination of one of the gaming world's greatest achievements in art and design.

Summary

Pros
  • Continues to stretch the boundaries of the series
  • Improved pacing and great new upgrades
  • New controls and presentation do not obstruct the core experience
  • Unbelievable production values
Cons
  • Map screen can be frustrating to manipulate
  • Occasionally long load times
Review Page 2: Conclusion

Talkback

EnnerSeptember 03, 2007

Great review. Can't wait to get my hands on this.

Bill AurionSeptember 03, 2007

I disagree with lastability...The bosses have been so fantastic that I'm going to be starting up a new game as soon as I've finished!

10! It's a 10! =D

Patchkid15Patrick Barnett, Associate EditorSeptember 03, 2007

i am so sad i am a little farther then half. and i just broke my wrist. now i cant finish the game for awhile.
but i totally agree with this review.

Luigi DudeSeptember 03, 2007

I agree with Bill, the boss fights alone will make you want to play the game over and over again because of how amazing they are.

MashiroSeptember 03, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Bill Aurion
I disagree with lastability...The bosses have been so fantastic that I'm going to be starting up a new game as soon as I've finished!

10! It's a 10! =D


Truth . . . (though I agree with the rest of the review).

This is one of those few games that I look forward to completing just so I can complete it on the next difficulty level just to see how much harder the bosses are (among other things).

king of snakeSeptember 03, 2007

Couldn't agree more with everything that was said. This game is a masterpiece.

I applaud Retro for keeping their own direction with this series. They could have turned Metroid into a first-person shooter. Instead we got a subtle, engrossing, sci-fi forensic investigation with minor shooting elements. One thing Johnny said rings especially true: that the Scan Visor is the defining characteristic of the game. Some of my favorite moments are scanning the various items and reading "Initial activation 132.8 years ago". You really feel like you're in some odd, deteriorating, ancient foreign world. The story and environments are so detailed and rich, it feels like a sci-fi novel wrapped in a video game.

Here's looking forward to Retro's next project. I have to admit I am saddened to see this trilogy come to an end. I do hope they work on another Metroid title at some point in the future.

BloodworthDaniel Bloodworth, Staff AlumnusSeptember 03, 2007

I wish they would have taken the risk and given Samus some good voice work. I felt the interactions suffered a little from her silence. Plus she did speak extensively in Fusion and Super Metroid's intro.

I still don't know why Retro put fetch quests into these games, but at least with this one, I didn't have to backtrack. And I beat the game without even getting all of them.

Also, not a fan of not being able to save my game at the end. -- If you do, you have to start over, so no going back to look for goodies.

I finished at 14-ish hours with 90%, and spent another hour or so getting the last 10% items. Now I'm heading back for my missing Lore.

Bill AurionSeptember 03, 2007

Samus is one of those personas whose character plays out perfectly through silence, probably even more-so than Link...So no, I am very thankful they didn't give her a voice... =)

GoldenPhoenixSeptember 03, 2007

I have one question, does MEtroid Prime 3's controls match up against dual analog controls for FPS? face-icon-small-smile.gif

Anyway great review.

Sir_StabbalotSeptember 03, 2007

Didn't read the review. Don't want to spoil anything.

Quote

Originally posted by: Bill Aurion
Samus is one of those personas whose character plays out perfectly through silence, probably even more-so than Link...So no, I am very thankful they didn't give her a voice... =)


Well, she does have a voice actor, but only for grunts and sounds like that. I agree that she really fits a silent character.

edit: nvm

KnowsNothingSeptember 03, 2007

This game is unfathomably awesome.

Bill AurionSeptember 03, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: GoldenPhoenix
I have one question, does MEtroid Prime 3's controls match up against dual analog controls for FPS? face-icon-small-smile.gif

Match? No...

It far surpasses... =3

GoldenPhoenixSeptember 03, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Bill Aurion
Quote

Originally posted by: GoldenPhoenix
I have one question, does MEtroid Prime 3's controls match up against dual analog controls for FPS? face-icon-small-smile.gif

Match? No...

It far surpasses... =3


But some dweeb on IGN said it may be AS good as dual analog! So you lie!

Sir_StabbalotSeptember 03, 2007

Dual analog is just emulating a mouse. Wiimote is much closer in accuracy.

Quote

Originally posted by: Sir_Stabbalot
Didn't read the review. Don't want to spoil anything.


No spoilers in the review.

Smoke39September 03, 2007

I haven't finished the game yet, but so far I agree with the review regarding the series' evolution. I was at first a little disapointed that Corruption so far seems to be the least Metroid-like of the trilogy, but I've gotten over it because besides that one point the game is really quite well done. Still hopeful for Dread, though.

The controls are vastly superior to dual analogue, but I personally still prefer a mouse and keyboard. I wish the motions relating to stuff besides aiming worked better, though. They're all consistent enough to not be a problem, but it's pretty distracting to see Samus' arm weirdly jerking forward and back any time you have to move the remote toward or away from the screen.

KDR_11kSeptember 04, 2007

I want it... Unfortunately it's not coming until late October...

On another note, while NoA was giving out previews for MP3C, NoE is now starting previews for Super Paper Mario...

Shift KeySeptember 04, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: KDR_11k
I want it... Unfortunately it's not coming until late October...

On another note, while NoA was giving out previews for MP3C, NoE is now starting previews for Super Paper Mario...


Join the club. All these elitist gamers teasing us with their new games. Its a bloody outrage. I'm taking this to the proime ministar!

18 DaysSeptember 04, 2007

Quote

Maybe it's due to the larger disc size of Wii games

Larger physcially or larger storage?
Because if you meant physically I will HIT YOU. (The outside of the disc spins faster and therefore loads quicker)

Shift KeySeptember 04, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: 18 Days
Quote:

Maybe it's due to the larger disc size of Wii games


Larger physcially or larger storage?
Because if you meant physically I will HIT YOU. (The outside of the disc spins faster and therefore loads quicker)




Nah mate, the disc spins at the same speed no matter where the laser is positioned. Its just that the outer parts of the disc have a higher read rate because the track radius is greater, which gives the illusion that the data loads quicker.

Check the data rates the next time you burn a DVD. It increases as you burn towards the outer edge of the disc, and that's nothing to do with the speed.

EDIT: Pro tip: If you spin a CD at more than 52x (that is, 52 revolutions per second) then there's a good chance it will shatter into a million pieces. That's why CD burner speeds have maxed out.

mantidorSeptember 04, 2007

ARGH like if I wasn't hyped enough, and I can't find the damn game anywhere around here face-icon-small-frown.gif

Its unfortunate the loading times, but expected. How are loading times in other games?

UltimatePartyBearSeptember 04, 2007

Load delays are largely a function of seek time, not read speed. Larger discs have longer seek times because there is more physical movement involved.

KDR_11kSeptember 04, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: 18 Days
Quote:

Maybe it's due to the larger disc size of Wii games


Larger physcially or larger storage?
Because if you meant physically I will HIT YOU. (The outside of the disc spins faster and therefore loads quicker)




Seek times, you fool!

18 DaysSeptember 04, 2007

*grumble*

Why aren't games linear like music?

archioverloadSeptember 04, 2007


Quote

Corruption, because it has added its own deviations in addition to those inherited from the previous two Prime games, is particularly unrecognizable as a Metroid game.


This take came up for the review for Hunters too, and I really disagree with this, actually. By definition, if it has Metroid on the box and has a reasonable similarity in terms of genre to the predecessors (which would exclude, e.g., Pinball), it's a Metroid game. I dislike this idea that there has to be these hoops to jump through in order to make it a "real" Metroid game.

It's a suffocating way to look at game design.

GoldenPhoenixSeptember 04, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: archioverload
Quote

Corruption, because it has added its own deviations in addition to those inherited from the previous two Prime games, is particularly unrecognizable as a Metroid game.


This take came up for the review for Hunters too, and I really disagree with this, actually. By definition, if it has Metroid on the box and has a reasonable similarity in terms of genre to the predecessors (which would exclude, e.g., Pinball), it's a Metroid game. I dislike this idea that there has to be these hoops to jump through in order to make it a "real" Metroid game.

It's a suffocating way to look at game design.


Technically you could also argue that Metroid Prime 1 wasn't a true Metroid game either, whether it be scavenger hunts, the first person perspective, and ::gasp:: it was 3D. Personally I think a TRUE Metroid game is an action game that requires sometimes complex puzzle solving along with exploration. Yeah you being alone could be considered Metroidesque, and even Metroid Prime 3 includes that after the introduction.

Bill AurionSeptember 04, 2007

Metroid Prime 3 sure feels like a Metroid game to me, and that's all that matters... =)

GoldenPhoenixSeptember 04, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Bill Aurion
Metroid Prime 3 sure feels like a Metroid game to me, and that's all that matters... =)


I don't see how you can feel it unless you have some goofy definition of what isn't a Metroid game. Hunters, on the other hand, isn't really a true Metroid game because its primary focus is BOOM BOOM shoot the aliens.

HypotheliciouslySeptember 04, 2007

I don't see how it's NOT a metriod game.

You run and jump alot; you shoot things; you kill bugs/plants and the like; you explore; you pick up new upgrades; and you explore some more.


Oh and let's not forget about the gigantic bosses that you must fight.

GoldenPhoenixSeptember 04, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: KashogiStogi
I don't see how it's NOT a metriod game.

You run and jump alot; you shoot things; you kill bugs/plants and the like; you explore; you pick up new upgrades; and you explore some more.


Oh and let's not forget about the gigantic bosses that you must fight.


I think the reason why people say it is not is because they shook up the formula a bit to make a fresh experience, which I see NO problem in, in fact I think it is a good thing. The beginning of the game was super fresh for a Metroid game and I think it helped set the tone perfectly for the game, especially since you are thinking "Wow, what else does Retro have in store for me? Looks like they went all the way here".

Ian SaneSeptember 04, 2007

"I wish they would have taken the risk and given Samus some good voice work. I felt the interactions suffered a little from her silence. Plus she did speak extensively in Fusion and Super Metroid's intro."

I agree. Samus isn't really supposed to be a silent character. Link traditionally never even said anything in text. Samus did. My only concern is what voice they would use. I don't think it's supposed to be common knowledge in the Metroid universe that Samus is a female. I'm worried that if they gave her a voice that it would give away the "secret". If I made a voice for Samus I would have a female voice actress but I would alter the voice in such a way that it doesn't suggest a specific gender. I would assume that Samus' suit alters her voice to disguise it. Adding a voice to a character is a risk and I would prefer they not do it at all than f*ck it up (like they did with Mario) but it is doable and would be appropriate.

So far Metroid Prime 3 feels like a Metroid game but it's the least Metroid-like of the Prime games thus far. There's kind of a line that seperates Metroid from Not Metroid. I couldn't tell you where exactly it is but I would know if they crossed it. I can tell they're approaching the line here but they haven't crossed it yet. Metroid Prime Hunters however crossed it though I don't hear many arguements that that's a real Metroid game anyway.

thatguySeptember 04, 2007

The last metroid is in captivity. The galaxy is at peace.

Samus spoke, we all know. She never spoke in the originals because there wasn't really anyone to talk to. I think she didn't necessarily need a voice actor, but she did at least need a way to communicate.

GoldenPhoenixSeptember 04, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: thatguy
The last metroid is in captivity. The galaxy is at peace.

Samus spoke, we all know. She never spoke in the originals because there wasn't really anyone to talk to. I think she didn't necessarily need a voice actor, but she did at least need a way to communicate.


She communicated in sign language. DUH!

MashiroSeptember 04, 2007

Samus did NOT say "The Last Metroid is in Captivity. The Galaxy is at Peace". That was the narrator face-icon-small-tongue.gif

GoldenPhoenixSeptember 04, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Mashiro
Samus did NOT say "The Last Metroid is in Captivity. The Galaxy is at Peace". That was the narrator face-icon-small-tongue.gif


Then who was the narrator?

thatguySeptember 04, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Mashiro
Samus did NOT say "The Last Metroid is in Captivity. The Galaxy is at Peace". That was the narrator face-icon-small-tongue.gif


She did too. Afterwards, we had a peek at her diary log.

MashiroSeptember 04, 2007

That's a freaking mans voice, holy God people =/

If anything it was probably a scientists voice or just a convenient random narrator.

Sound clip for great justice.

Bill AurionSeptember 04, 2007

I already spoiled it in MP3 thread that Samus really is a guy... =)

GoldenPhoenixSeptember 04, 2007

Don't mind Mashiro he is just sexist and feels that no woman should talk.

MashiroSeptember 04, 2007

But but . . . that's a man! >.>

Samus should talk . . . while she is making me a sandwich and getting me a beer! OHHHH SNAPPP!!!!!! jk of course.

Regarding this business of whether Prime 3 is a real Metroid game (and likewise for Hunters)...

One thing I was trying to establish in the first section of my review is that Corruption is the least like a Metroid game yet, at least in some ways, and yet that is actually a good thing because Retro has created something so amazing and original and yet still knows how to pay homage to the original games. Hunters is also not much of a Metroid game, but that's a bad thing in its case because what it is instead pretty much blows. (I'm only referring to the single-player part.)

So yeah, I was actually trying to compliment Corruption with that remark, but I can definitely see how it could be misconstrued. It's a complex argument to make about a very complex game and series, and I did my best to keep the thesis brief so I wouldn't bore people to tears with a lot of academic philosophizing right up front.

TrueNerdSeptember 04, 2007

That was a beautiful review, Jonathan.

MashiroSeptember 04, 2007

If there is one thing I can say about the Prime 3 experience and sum up how it is different from Prime 1 and 2 and the other metroid games is . . .

The experience retains a perfect balance of free exploration while pointing you in the right direction. They do a great job of making you not really get lost but at the same time you can easily get lost in the exploration of the worlds given to you.

Does that make sense? lol.

archioverloadSeptember 05, 2007

Nothing wrong with philosophizing face-icon-small-smile.gif

...it's a really interesting question...especially in terms of Nintendo's future strategy and the debate over casual gamers vs. hardcore gamers--who, exactly, Nintendo is making games for now? I'm really curious to see how MP3 sells. I think that was what I was trying to say (very clumsily) in my post--that a significant minority--maybe even a small majority--of people buying MP3 aren't going to be Metroid fans, so whether it hits ALL the touchstones in the previous incarnations are going to matter less.

I love this game, and this review is great. I do feel like it missed something: sometimes doors just don't open the first time you walk up to them. You have to walk away and walk back towards them.

That's really damn annoying if you're running for your life.

GoldenPhoenixSeptember 05, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Crimm
I love this game, and this review is great. I do feel like it missed something: sometimes doors just don't open the first time you walk up to them. You have to walk away and walk back towards them.

That's really damn annoying if you're running for your life.


Hasn't the same thing been happening since Metroid Prime 1?

vuduSeptember 05, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Ian Sane
I don't think it's supposed to be common knowledge in the Metroid universe that Samus is a female. I'm worried that if they gave her a voice that it would give away the "secret".
Have you played the game yet? Because the opening cut scene shows Zero Suit Samus, which kind of gives away the "secret" more so than any voice work would.

Madcat221September 05, 2007

Completely silent characters when everyone else is talking really bugs me. What I think they should have done with Samus is something along the lines of Master Chief's speaking: make her laconic

MashiroSeptember 05, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: GoldenPhoenix
Quote

Originally posted by: Crimm
I love this game, and this review is great. I do feel like it missed something: sometimes doors just don't open the first time you walk up to them. You have to walk away and walk back towards them.

That's really damn annoying if you're running for your life.


Hasn't the same thing been happening since Metroid Prime 1?


That's just loading times (in this case, as it was said somewhere else, maybe even in this thread, it's disc "seeking" times.) In the end though it's still just the disc trying to load.

Ian SaneSeptember 05, 2007

"Have you played the game yet? Because the opening cut scene shows Zero Suit Samus, which kind of gives away the "secret" more so than any voice work would."

But I'm assuming that the general public of the Metroid universe doesn't see that. Like all the generic army dudes Samus talks to probably don't know she's a woman. It's probably only medical staff that has worked on her and high ranking generals and such that know.

GoldenPhoenixSeptember 05, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Mashiro
Quote

Originally posted by: GoldenPhoenix
Quote

Originally posted by: Crimm
I love this game, and this review is great. I do feel like it missed something: sometimes doors just don't open the first time you walk up to them. You have to walk away and walk back towards them.

That's really damn annoying if you're running for your life.


Hasn't the same thing been happening since Metroid Prime 1?


That's just loading times (in this case, as it was said somewhere else, maybe even in this thread, it's disc "seeking" times.) In the end though it's still just the disc trying to load.


So the doors not opening right away are related to load times? Fascinating I never knew that.

MashiroSeptember 05, 2007

-_-; no need to be snippy.

GoldenPhoenixSeptember 05, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Mashiro
-_-; no need to be snippy.


I wasn't, I actually didn't know the doors taking so long to open was related to load.

MashiroSeptember 05, 2007

Oh lol I'm sorry it sounded sarcastic =)

my apologizes <3

I'm at the door to the final boss (I think). I've been playing through the game right before bed, for like an hour at a time, and I love it. Right now I'm backtracking through all the planets to find all the pickups. I love the fact that MP3 tells you the locations of the pickups--finding them on my own in previous Metroid games was the boon of the gameplay for me.

The door loading can get very annoying, but it doesn't make me not like the overall presentation. The art direction alone makes up for it.

Quote

Originally posted by: GoldenPhoenix
Quote

Originally posted by: Crimm
I love this game, and this review is great. I do feel like it missed something: sometimes doors just don't open the first time you walk up to them. You have to walk away and walk back towards them.

That's really damn annoying if you're running for your life.


Hasn't the same thing been happening since Metroid Prime 1?


Yes, which is why it should be fixed by now. I doubt it is loading time, and even if it is they can preload. Most games do that for stuff behind doors.

MashiroSeptember 05, 2007

There...there's nothing to "fix" though. The game is loading . . . I'm sure they didn't just leave it in to piss people off. If they could have had it not load at those points it wouldn't.

You can clearly hear the game loading, ESPECIALLY on the Wii. Just listen to the system when doors don't open right away. You'll here the system reading the disc.

(Also for the record the game does pre-load areas too an extent where it can, which is why some doors open more quickly than others. You can occasionally hear the disc reading while you approach doors as well).



Maybe they need a more intelligent pre-loading system though? There were some areas the doors were "sticky" where there was only one way out anyways... aside from the way we came in.

Or perhaps they need to incorporate it more into the game's world: doors that actually open "sticky," like they're malfunctioning or something. Everywhere in Metroid is basically run down, why not have doors that are sorta acting broken and evidently so?

UERDSeptember 05, 2007

Because then people would say 'it's a cheap gimmick to compensate for the otherwise-glaring inadequacies of the Wii hardware.' Gee, Kairon. Don't you know anything?

/condescending

HypotheliciouslySeptember 05, 2007

I like that idea Kairon. If the doors that took longer to load opened slower, then it wouldn't feel like random occurrences.

MashiroSeptember 05, 2007

True not a bad idea Carry-on.

Quote

Originally posted by: UERD
Because then people would say 'it's a cheap gimmick to compensate for the otherwise-glaring inadequacies of the Wii hardware.' Gee, Kairon. Don't you know anything?

/condescending




Uh-huh.. lemme ask you, what do you see here?

Ac_erechtheum2.jpg

Great Grecian architecture right? Timeless right? A wonderful work of art that should be preserved through the ages and studied by art history students again and again and again!

Those are ionic capitals of course. Let's get a close-up of what a typical ionic capital looks like.

IonicCapitalPriene.jpg

Neat huh? Sorta crazy huh? Why do they twirl like that?

BECAUSE THEY'RE CHEAP GIMMICKS COMPENSATING FOR THE INADEQUACIES OF ANCIENT GREEK ARCHITECTURAL TECHNOLOGY! THAT'S WHY!!!

The Greeks couldn't solve one FUGLY problem: columns were CIRCLES and roofs were generally RECTANGULAR. You stick a circle on the corner of a rectangle and what do you get? WASTED SPACE. The edges don't match up! It doesn't fit! IT'S FUGLY.

Oh wait, but let's return to the first picture I posted, and take a closer look at the corner.

Ac_erechtheum2_closeup.jpg

Check out what that Capital is doing. It's just a big 'ol waste of space that PRETTIFIES the melding of the two shapes. Or, as wikipedia likes to state it: the capital projects on each side as it rises, in order to support the abacus and unite the form of the latter (normally square) with the circular shaft of the column.

All these fancy ionian and corinthian and doric capitals of antiquity that are so respected are really just extra moulding to HIDE and SMOOTH the aesthetic transition between column and whatever's on top. But that's what makes them so great, they're SOLUTIONS to limitations and problems. Just what I'm asking for from Metroid Prime 3, simple structural elements to aesthetically smooth transitions. All I'm asking for is some friggin' old-as-hell Ionian frickin' capitals on my friggin Bryyonian, Elysian, Norian, and etc. freakin' columns!



P.S. All images were found on wikipedia.
P.S.S. I learned this by reading Ayn Rand's the Fountainhead!

HypotheliciouslySeptember 05, 2007

kiaron.....

have you ever once in your life said "f*ck it"?

Figuratively? ... a couple times. Usually that's what I say to myself whenever I get tempted to intervene in yet another of Golden Phoenix's and Svevan's little wars.

thatguySeptember 05, 2007

I like the broken idea. For me, I always just shoot the door as soon as I see it. Virtually every time I get there, it's already open.

KDR_11kSeptember 06, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Ian Sane
"Have you played the game yet? Because the opening cut scene shows Zero Suit Samus, which kind of gives away the "secret" more so than any voice work would."

But I'm assuming that the general public of the Metroid universe doesn't see that. Like all the generic army dudes Samus talks to probably don't know she's a woman. It's probably only medical staff that has worked on her and high ranking generals and such that know.


Metroid Fusion had the CO call her "lady". I'd assume everyone she works with knows she's a woman.

Oh for gosh sakes they BIO-SCANNED her! There is no privacy of medical information in the galactic federation, they ALL know she's a woman.

UltimatePartyBearSeptember 06, 2007

The way I think of it, it's fairly obvious to anyone who interacts with her that she's a woman, but her legendary exploits get told and retold in the bars of the galaxy until some of the details are a little fuzzy. The gossip is that one person took out an entire Space Pirate base single-handed. The sex of the person responsible gets lost as an unimportant detail, and then good old-fashioned assumptions take over.

HypotheliciouslySeptember 06, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Kairon
Figuratively? ... a couple times. Usually that's what I say to myself whenever I get tempted to intervene in yet another of Golden Phoenix's and Svevan's little wars.


What happened with that post of yours above?

Something of that nature would have definitely been in my "F*ck it" category.

Quote

Originally posted by: KashogiStogi
Quote

Originally posted by: Kairon
Figuratively? ... a couple times. Usually that's what I say to myself whenever I get tempted to intervene in yet another of Golden Phoenix's and Svevan's little wars.


What happened with that post of yours above?

Something of that nature would have definitely been in my "F*ck it" category.


It was fun!

And I'm an Ayn Rand fan, and only learned how to use photobucket a month ago. Wiiii!!!!

HypotheliciouslySeptember 06, 2007

I guess I can see that. I do love to rant sometimes. Though, I must say I shouldn't rant as much when I am very very drunk. People say they are always funny, but that they are usually very offensive.

shammackSeptember 06, 2007

PROTIP: The "The last metroid is in captivity" voice was Dan Owsen of NOA.

I'd like to think that in the future or the galaxy where the Metroid games take place or whatever, Samus's gender is irrelevant.

But now we know that that can't be the last Metroid. Metroids are dispersed over so many planets, who knows where the pirates have taken them?

Quote

Originally posted by: Kairon
But now we know that that can't be the last Metroid. Metroids are dispersed over so many planets, who knows where the pirates have taken them?


Timeline. The Prime subseries comes before Metroid II (and therefore Super Metroid).

Hostile CreationSeptember 06, 2007

I noticed you talking about Samus talking before, but I didn't see anyone mention Metroid Fusion. She talks a whole, whole lot in Metroid Fusion. It sounds like internal monologue, the ways it's written, but they are her words.

ZapSeptember 07, 2007

I agree the game is a solid 9.5 and just finished tonight. Overall, some upgrades were too easy to get, and some areas seemed a little lifeless. It also felt like there were much fewer things (computers especially) to scan and thus, less background info than Prime 1. The fetch-quest irked me, as did the fact that the rooms that respawned the most annoying enemies imaginable tended to be the ones connected to the longest door-load times.

But the New Formula™ is intriguing; the controls and aiming are precise and superior; the design of some rooms make your imagination spin. And rampaging against hordes of foes is even more gratifying as a result of these synergetic qualities.

Must. Have.

Michael8983September 07, 2007

Well I WAS loving this game up until I had to wait a whole SIX SECONDS for a door to open. So I give it a 3/10. Not even worth a rental.

(kidding, don't kill me)

SvevanEvan Burchfield, Staff AlumnusSeptember 07, 2007

Samus also talks (in a way) in the logbook in Prime 1 and 2 (haven't played 3 yet). When you go back to the logbook and look at your upgrades, the words are in the first person. So she CAN speak, her voice is just SECRET.

NinGurl69 *hugglesSeptember 07, 2007

She's actually Dr. Girlfriend from Venture Brothers.

mantidorSeptember 08, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Hostile Creation
I noticed you talking about Samus talking before, but I didn't see anyone mention Metroid Fusion. She talks a whole, whole lot in Metroid Fusion. It sounds like internal monologue, the ways it's written, but they are her words.


She also had a full discussion with Adam, so it wasn't only internal monologue.

Also in Echoes, the voice you hear is from the computer in her suit, I doubt they've given her a voice at all in any prime game.

Samus has a voice in all three Prime games. She just doesn't speak. She grunts and screams in every game, although I believe only the European and Japanese versions of the first game had her voice samples.

NinGurl69 *hugglesSeptember 08, 2007

She moans so loudly when I cook her in hot sticky gel in MP3.

PlugabugzSeptember 08, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Jonnyboy117
Samus has a voice in all three Prime games. She just doesn't speak. She grunts and screams in every game, although I believe only the European and Japanese versions of the first game had her voice samples.


There want any speaking from Samus from the copy i have. There was a spoken narrator at the beginning of Prime.

Smoke39September 08, 2007

I just beat the game yesterday. I'm disapointed that the ending didn't really tie into Metroid II at all. Does the 100% ending add anything in that regard?

Bill AurionSeptember 08, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Smoke39
I just beat the game yesterday. I'm disapointed that the ending didn't really tie into Metroid II at all. Does the 100% ending add anything in that regard?

Looks like there will be a game in-between Prime 3 and Metroid II...*wink wink* =3

Smoke39September 08, 2007

Oh god. What has Retro done to Metroid's storyline?

MashiroSeptember 08, 2007

God I have to beat this game lol.

ZapSeptember 08, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Smoke39
Oh god. What has Retro done to Metroid's storyline?


The same thing nintendo does to every game: instead of using game endings to fill in pleasant details that would enhance the cohesiveness of a franchise's plot, they just plop the protagonist down, have them look off into the distance, pan the camera around some of the game's scenery, and call it quits.

Quote

Originally posted by: MJRx9000
Quote

Originally posted by: Smoke39
Oh god. What has Retro done to Metroid's storyline?


The same thing nintendo does to every game: instead of using game endings to fill in pleasant details that would enhance the cohesiveness of a franchise's plot, they just plop the protagonist down, have them look off into the distance, pan the camera around some of the game's scenery, and call it quits.


Coulda been worse. They coulda baked you a cake.

UltimatePartyBearSeptember 10, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Svevan
Samus also talks (in a way) in the logbook in Prime 1 and 2 (haven't played 3 yet). When you go back to the logbook and look at your upgrades, the words are in the first person. So she CAN speak, her voice is just SECRET.


Actually, they're in the second person. I'm playing through Prime 2, and it's a little jarring that all that text is seemingly addressed to the player. Who's supposed to be telling me this stuff about my ship and missile combos? Samus? Even the sections labeled as Samus's notes are sprinkled with "you" and "your."

mantidorSeptember 10, 2007

Nintendo is just enforcing cross-gender into the players with the game, unless they are girls of course.

Bill AurionSeptember 10, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Smoke39
Oh god. What has Retro done to Metroid's storyline?

It had a storyline? Last I saw the series was basically "Bounty hunter goes to Planet X, kills stuff, blows up Planet X...Then she goes to another Planet Y, kills stuff, manages not to blow up Planet Y..." I think it's time to take off the rose-tinted glasses... =3

NinGurl69 *hugglesSeptember 10, 2007

Kool-Aid contacts.

Smoke39September 10, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Bill Aurion
Quote

Originally posted by: Smoke39
Oh god. What has Retro done to Metroid's storyline?

It had a storyline? Last I saw the series was basically "Bounty hunter goes to Planet X, kills stuff, blows up Planet X...Then she goes to another Planet Y, kills stuff, manages not to blow up Planet Y..." I think it's time to take off the rose-tinted glasses... =3

There isn't a big, detailed plot, but every game has tied into the previous one. Metroid II was motivated by the pirates' failed attempts at using metroids as weapons in the first game. It's not like Samus was just cruisin' around randomly picking planets to go kill stuff on for shits and giggles.

Bill AurionSeptember 10, 2007

And it's not like Samus went to the planets in this game for any random reason either...Not only that, the game ties everything from the other two games together so you can see how the next game picked up, while also tieing into the eventual next game in the series...I really don't see what you are complaining about...

MashiroSeptember 10, 2007

I must finish this game so I can see what the ending is and debate this . . .

GoldenPhoenixSeptember 10, 2007

Metroid 1 did not tie into Metroid 3. Last I checked in Metroid 1 Ridley was a bug eyed purple beetle thing and Kraid was a mini dinosaur.

SvevanEvan Burchfield, Staff AlumnusSeptember 11, 2007

Nintendo's bad at continuity because they love formula and design. This isn't a negative aspect of their game development at all; the continuity between the three Prime games is unprecedented for a Nintendo franchise, probably because we Westerns (and Retro too) are obsessed with narrative. (Wind Waker was spectacularly weird for tying into OoT.)

Nintendo's choices with regards to narrative continuity are made after the game design has been put into place; the way you play Metroid is more important than why you play Metroid (though both are important). Same goes for Mario, Zelda, Pokemon, even the plot heavy Star Fox.

Personally, I like the idea of recycled plot and design. I personally wish every Zelda game was an experiment that created a new Hyrule from scratch (a la Wind Waker and Majora's Mask). Twilight Princess did an awesome job of that, but since exploring Hyrule is the crux of the Zelda games, Nintendo can't repeat that Hyrule and will either have Link go somewhere else or start over again. To me, that's the way it should be: none of these games should connect. Metroid is different, but we're still going through the same old motions every time we start a Metroid game - why not reboot the plot every time too? Star Fox (and Donkey Kong, and Metroid 1, and every frigging Nintendo game) has taught us that it doesn't matter if the plot in a video game is good, it just matters that there's a plot at all. Once again quoting Peter Greenaway: continuity is boring.

GoldenPhoenixSeptember 11, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Svevan
Nintendo's bad at continuity because they love formula and design. This isn't a negative aspect of their game development at all; the continuity between the three Prime games is unprecedented for a Nintendo franchise, probably because we Westerns (and Retro too) are obsessed with narrative. (Wind Waker was spectacularly weird for tying into OoT.)

Nintendo's choices with regards to narrative continuity are made after the game design has been put into place; the way you play Metroid is more important than why you play Metroid (though both are important). Same goes for Mario, Zelda, Pokemon, even the plot heavy Star Fox.

Personally, I like the idea of recycled plot and design. I personally wish every Zelda game was an experiment that created a new Hyrule from scratch (a la Wind Waker and Majora's Mask). Twilight Princess did an awesome job of that, but since exploring Hyrule is the crux of the Zelda games, Nintendo can't repeat that Hyrule and will either have Link go somewhere else or start over again. To me, that's the way it should be: none of these games should connect. Metroid is different, but we're still going through the same old motions every time we start a Metroid game - why not reboot the plot every time too? Star Fox (and Donkey Kong, and Metroid 1, and every frigging Nintendo game) has taught us that it doesn't matter if the plot in a video game is good, it just matters that there's a plot at all. Once again quoting Peter Greenaway: continuity is boring.


You know, I hate to say it, but I agree with everything that Evan has said there. I especially think that the Prime series should be a reboot of sorts, it is basically a whole new take on the Metroid franchise so in turn, why not reboot some of the plot points in order to make a more exciting (And unpredictable) excursion into the Metroid universe.

MashiroSeptember 11, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: GoldenPhoenix
Quote

Originally posted by: Svevan
Nintendo's bad at continuity because they love formula and design. This isn't a negative aspect of their game development at all; the continuity between the three Prime games is unprecedented for a Nintendo franchise, probably because we Westerns (and Retro too) are obsessed with narrative. (Wind Waker was spectacularly weird for tying into OoT.)

Nintendo's choices with regards to narrative continuity are made after the game design has been put into place; the way you play Metroid is more important than why you play Metroid (though both are important). Same goes for Mario, Zelda, Pokemon, even the plot heavy Star Fox.

Personally, I like the idea of recycled plot and design. I personally wish every Zelda game was an experiment that created a new Hyrule from scratch (a la Wind Waker and Majora's Mask). Twilight Princess did an awesome job of that, but since exploring Hyrule is the crux of the Zelda games, Nintendo can't repeat that Hyrule and will either have Link go somewhere else or start over again. To me, that's the way it should be: none of these games should connect. Metroid is different, but we're still going through the same old motions every time we start a Metroid game - why not reboot the plot every time too? Star Fox (and Donkey Kong, and Metroid 1, and every frigging Nintendo game) has taught us that it doesn't matter if the plot in a video game is good, it just matters that there's a plot at all. Once again quoting Peter Greenaway: continuity is boring.


You know, I hate to say it, but I agree with everything that Evan has said there. I especially think that the Prime series should be a reboot of sorts, it is basically a whole new take on the Metroid franchise so in turn, why not reboot some of the plot points in order to make a more exciting (And unpredictable) excursion into the Metroid universe.


I will point to Super Metroid as the rebuttal to that whole ideal.

Continuity helps to establish lore and important story elements that to some people (such as myself) helps to make (in the case of games) sequels all the more awesome.

GoldenPhoenixSeptember 11, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Mashiro
Quote

Originally posted by: GoldenPhoenix
Quote

Originally posted by: Svevan
Nintendo's bad at continuity because they love formula and design. This isn't a negative aspect of their game development at all; the continuity between the three Prime games is unprecedented for a Nintendo franchise, probably because we Westerns (and Retro too) are obsessed with narrative. (Wind Waker was spectacularly weird for tying into OoT.)

Nintendo's choices with regards to narrative continuity are made after the game design has been put into place; the way you play Metroid is more important than why you play Metroid (though both are important). Same goes for Mario, Zelda, Pokemon, even the plot heavy Star Fox.

Personally, I like the idea of recycled plot and design. I personally wish every Zelda game was an experiment that created a new Hyrule from scratch (a la Wind Waker and Majora's Mask). Twilight Princess did an awesome job of that, but since exploring Hyrule is the crux of the Zelda games, Nintendo can't repeat that Hyrule and will either have Link go somewhere else or start over again. To me, that's the way it should be: none of these games should connect. Metroid is different, but we're still going through the same old motions every time we start a Metroid game - why not reboot the plot every time too? Star Fox (and Donkey Kong, and Metroid 1, and every frigging Nintendo game) has taught us that it doesn't matter if the plot in a video game is good, it just matters that there's a plot at all. Once again quoting Peter Greenaway: continuity is boring.


You know, I hate to say it, but I agree with everything that Evan has said there. I especially think that the Prime series should be a reboot of sorts, it is basically a whole new take on the Metroid franchise so in turn, why not reboot some of the plot points in order to make a more exciting (And unpredictable) excursion into the Metroid universe.


I will point to Super Metroid as the rebuttal to that whole ideal.

Continuity helps to establish lore and important story elements that to some people (such as myself) helps to make (in the case of games) sequels all the more awesome.


The thing is that Metroid never really had established lore to begin with, especially the first game where a bunch of dorks wrote up a quick story for the American releases booklet. If anything Prime is really the only game that tried to establish any kind of lore, except for Super Metroids limited use of it.

Smoke39September 11, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Bill Aurion
And it's not like Samus went to the planets in this game for any random reason either...Not only that, the game ties everything from the other two games together so you can see how the next game picked up, while also tieing into the eventual next game in the series...I really don't see what you are complaining about...

I'm complaining about Retro lodging this random new storyline in an arbitrary place between two of the original games that used to follow one directly after the other. That, and I'm not a big fan of Retro's take on Metroid in general. I've definitely enjoyed the Prime games on their own merrits, but part of me can't help but kind of wish that they hadn't been set in the Metroid universe and would have just left the Metroid franchise alone.

GoldenPhoenixSeptember 11, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Smoke39
Quote

Originally posted by: Bill Aurion
And it's not like Samus went to the planets in this game for any random reason either...Not only that, the game ties everything from the other two games together so you can see how the next game picked up, while also tieing into the eventual next game in the series...I really don't see what you are complaining about...

I'm complaining about Retro lodging this random new storyline in an arbitrary place between two of the original games that used to follow one directly after the other. That, and I'm not a big fan of Retro's take on Metroid in general. I've definitely enjoyed the Prime games on their own merrits, but part of me can't help but kind of wish that they hadn't been set in the Metroid universe and would have just left the Metroid franchise alone.


Thankfully you are only one of the few that believe that. The way I see it, the backstory in the original games had about as much substance as Pac-Man, and complaining about Metroid Prime 3 ruining that story is like complaining that Pac-Man World ruined the plot to the original. If anything, the Metroid Prime series gave a soul to the background story.

I could not agree more. Here's the general plot (spoilers ahead...yeah right) to the Metroid canon without the Prime series:

1) Samus is ordered by the Galactic Federation to go to Zebes and destroy the Metroid threat, and Mother Brain, leader of the Space Pirates, who don't even show up in the original game.
2) Samus is ordered by the Galactic Federation to go to SR388 and destroy all the Metroids on the planet, hopefully causing the extinction of the species. Samus kills the queen only to find a hatchling, who sees Samus as its mother (groan). She takes it back to the Federation.
3) The Pirates finally reveal themselves, steal the baby, and Samus...goes...and...gets it back? The Hatchling destroys Mother Brain but sacrifices itself in the process. So sad.
4) Samus is infected with the X Parasite (worst...name...EVER), which is thriving on SR388 now that the Metroids are gone. Samus is injected with a Metroid serum, made from that hatchling's DNA, and becomes half human, half Metroid. Or something. Diffusion Missiles are the ultimate result (sigh). Samus discovers that the Federation is cloning and breeding Metroids for military purposes. Samus blows up the station and with it, SR388.

WOW. I mean, that's a NOVEL right there. DANG. So many PLOT TWISTS. So much...so much character development. Tolstoy WISHES he could write that kind of nail-biter.

Get real. Without Metroid Prime, the series would be DEVOID of any sort of mythos. Thanks to the Prime series, we know detailed information about the Pirates and their motivations. We know a LOT more about the Chozo and Samus' origins. We know about Samus' involvment with the Galactic Federation and with other hunters. We know a lot more about Metroids and, thanks to Corruption, Mother Brain.

I can only hope that Nintendo capitalizes on all this backstory in their next (presumably) 2D Metroid game. The Metroid series doesn't have to be Metal Gear Solid, but it doesn't have to be Pac-Man, either.

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Wii

Game Profile

Metroid Prime 3: Corruption Box Art

Genre Adventure
Developer Retro Studios
Players1
Controllers

Worldwide Releases

na: Metroid Prime 3: Corruption
Release Aug 27, 2007
PublisherNintendo
RatingTeen
jpn: Metroid Prime 3: Corruption
Release Mar 06, 2008
PublisherNintendo
eu: Metroid Prime 3: Corruption
Release Oct 26, 2007
PublisherNintendo
Rating12+
aus: Metroid Prime 3: Corruption
Release Nov 08, 2007
PublisherNintendo
RatingMature
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