Wii

North America

The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess

by Jonathan Metts - November 18, 2006, 10:25 pm PST
Total comments: 41

10

Nintendo takes a much needed break from shorter, simpler games to deliver one of the greatest, most epic adventures ever played. No spoilers!

I love Wind Waker as much as anyone, but it's hard to deny that the game, for all its greatness, feels like something different from a true Zelda game. With Twilight Princess, the series has gone back to its roots… but not without a lot of unpredictable twists. It is nearly as daring as Eiji Aonuma's first game as Zelda director, Majora's Mask, which walked the fine line between feeling like a true Zelda game and yet upending nearly every convention of the series. Twilight Princess is clearly a sequel to Ocarina of Time, and it sometimes appears to mimic the structure and mood of that masterpiece. But just when you try to predict what will happen next based on precedent, Twilight Princess brings another surprise; the game plays upon your expectations and uses them to astound you even more. As you get deeper into the game, it becomes even less predictable, including (finally!) some new items that are completely original, as well as dungeon designs like nothing you've seen before. Overall, the game provides a perfect mixture of familiar and brand new elements.

In place of a "dark world" or time travel is the Twilight, which is seeping out of the Twilight Realm and taking over Hyrule. The affected areas are filled with an eerie dimness and truly disturbing music. As you already know, the power of the Twilight turns Link into a large wolf, and in this form he can run faster, dig into the ground and under walls, and use his heightened senses for a number of tasks. Wolf Link is ridden by Midna, a benevolent citizen of the Twilight Realm who has her own reasons for helping to restore Hyrule to its natural state. While in the Twilight, Midna helps you jump to distant platforms, and she also enables a special attack that can take out several enemies at once. She also advises Link and eventually provides additional functions. Midna is the analogue to Navi from Ocarina of Time, but unlike Navi, she has an actual personality and an ambiguous sense of morality, and she is never annoying.

Twilight Princess is generally a dark and serious game, but it's not constantly foreboding as the trailers may insinuate. There are cheerful sequences and whimsical characters; the game occasionally even shows a sense of humor. Likewise, the aesthetics are not limited to greens, browns, and epic battle music. The visuals can be brightly colorful at times, while everything in the Twilight (including Wolf Link) has a vaguely cartoonish style that takes nothing away from the ethereal creepiness of the realm. Although Link is blank as ever, the characters around him are more developed than in previous Zelda games, and some narrative scenes are even touching in their compassion for these people.

More important is the gameplay, which is a further refinement in a series well known for carefully inching forward with each game. In other words, Twilight Princess still plays like a Zelda game. There are modest advances in swordplay, including some hidden techniques and the ability to fight on horseback. Some of the old items are used in completely new ways. Dungeon designs are as tight as ever, and a couple of these labyrinths belong in the hall of fame. The bosses still rely on patterns and are still fairly easy, but they do get harder and more complex later in the game. Where Twilight Princess branches out is in the Twilight segments, but even these depend on a transformed Link, which has already been done in Majora's Mask. Of course, the timeless Zelda gameplay is virtually unmatched in all of gaming, so even the status quo would be an admirable goal, and Twilight Princess does better than that.

The game is impressively long without feeling drawn out, and there are no major fetch quests or anything else to slow down the quest (as did the Triforce scavenger hunt in Wind Waker). Hyrule Field is incredibly large, with four or five sections as large as the one in Ocarina of Time, but each one of these sections is separated and connected to others via multiple paths. You have access to Link's horse from the beginning of the game, and the game is designed so that you rarely need to traverse more than one area of the map, thus leaving Hyrule Field for the enjoyment of exploration. Merely traveling from one place to another is certainly never boring or drawn out, as it could be in Wind Waker, but the game world is also not as centralized and simplistic as in Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask. Hyrule is always a mysterious, even intimidating kingdom, and there are times when you can tell that the game was influenced by Sony's Shadow of the Colossus, which is a very, very good thing.

The controls in Twilight Princess definitely merit some discussion. The sword gesturing is the most controversial element, and deservedly so. Slashing with the Wii Remote arguably does add an immersive feel to swordplay, but the reduced responsiveness is not a valid tradeoff. The problem is that it takes too much force to activate sword attacks, and this setting cannot be adjusted. I'm not complaining out of laziness; there were instances when I had to make the sword motion two or three times before it would register. This lack of dependability screws up your timing in combat and absolutely leads to some damage being taken that otherwise would not be. It's not a critical issue because the game is usually forgiving in combat situations, but when I try to draw my sword and it doesn't happen, that has the reverse effect of destroying my immersion in the game and forcing me to think about the controls and why they aren't working. In contrast, the aiming function works extremely well and is used more than you would expect. The item management controls also deserve praise, as this game has found a way to combine the primary sub-item assignment of the very first Legend of Zelda with the at-ready inventory style of Ocarina of Time and later games. Having four items at your command means fewer trips to the pause menu, which is always a good thing. Since I have not played the GameCube version of Twilight Princess in well over a year, I have no idea how it handles item management or whether it feels less immersive than the Wii version. What I can say is that, despite my annoyance with the sword controls (which could be fixed in future games), the Wii version generally controls well, and any problems you do encounter with the control scheme can be overcome or ignored over time.

Though it is still a GameCube title at heart, the Wii version is excellent and may in fact be the definitive version after all the votes are counted. Twilight Princess tells an original and compelling story, complete with a surprisingly cohesive expression of art and sound not so far removed from the self-contained world that characterized Wind Waker. Rather than drastically reworking the series, Twilight Princess refines and expands almost everything you already love about Zelda, and it looks damn good doing it. Fans will forever argue over which game in this series is the best, but Twilight Princess makes a very strong bid for that title, and in my opinion, it deserves to be called the greatest Zelda game yet. Logically, that makes it one of the best games of all time.

Score

Graphics Sound Control Gameplay Lastability Final
9.5 10 8 10 10 10
Graphics
9.5

This may be a GameCube game under the hood, but it looks better than any other GameCube title (including Resident Evil 4) or any other Wii launch title. The system is surely capable of achieving more on a technical level, but the inspired art style of Twilight Princess, including both realistic and cartoon influences, will not easily be surpassed by any subsequent Wii adventure.

Sound
10

Disregarding the love-it-or-hate-it Wii Remote speaker sounds, which can be turned off in the system settings, the game's sound is superb. Early areas rely heavily on familiar Zelda songs, which sound much the same here as before, but the soundtrack truly comes alive with the large amount of original music, which runs the complete range from silly to somber to epic. There's no real voice acting, which needs to happen someday, but Midna speaks plenty of gibberish, which fits her character perfectly.

Control
8

I can't fully approve of Zelda controls when they are even this much inconsistent, but quick aiming and more robust item handling make up for sloppy sword controls. A simple sensitivity adjustment for the sword movement could have made a big difference.

Gameplay
10

The game spends some time reminding you how a Zelda game should play. Then it starts dishing out the surprises. Even when you can see the progression of the adventure laid out, the excitement of not knowing what will happen when this and that task are completed is palpable, and the game never disappoints at those junctions. An original, intriguing story and several great new characters help to provide motivation that was never really there for games like Ocarina of Time.

Lastability
10

This is definitely the longest Zelda game, and it is never padded with excessive travel or mundane scavenger hunts. Besides several dungeons and many story-driven activities in between, there are more heart pieces than ever, a huge world to explore, and the return of fishing and other mini-games that will remind you how much fun mini-games can be, when done properly and in the right context.

Final
10

Zelda is probably too much of a real video game for some of Nintendo's prospective mass market for Wii, but for anyone who already knows that you should always light the lanterns to reveal a hidden treasure chest, this game is a no-brainer purchase. Beyond that, it is an epic accomplishment for Nintendo's developers, a brilliant work of game design and artistic achievement that would be a milestone on any system. Yes, it is the best Zelda game. (And yeah, it kicks the snot out of Okami.)

Summary

Pros
  • Brilliant world and dungeon design
  • Combines classic Zelda elements with original material
  • Incredible production values all around
  • Longer and better paced than recent Zelda games
Cons
  • Less than perfect sword and climbing controls
Review Page 2: Conclusion

Talkback

MarioAllStarNovember 18, 2006

First off, thank you guys so much for providing spoiler-free reviews of games like this. I really appreciate them.

Everything has me very excited, except for the sword control issues, which are certainly disappointing. I can't help but notice that almost every review I have glanced at mentions lack of voice acting. Am I the only one (aside from Miyamoto) who isn't a big fan of it? It is fun to think up your own voices for characters! Oh well, it doesn't change gameplay at all.

Actually, the main characters already have voices. They just don't say much beyond "oh" and "ah". I can understand Miyamoto and fans not wanting Link to talk, but the other characters have distinct personalities and already have plenty to say through text. It is a natural step to implement high quality voice acting, and I believe the Zelda series will take that step one day. The problem is that as more and more games start to use voice, the fact that Zelda does not becomes more conspicuous, and the reason you're seeing more complaints about it these days is that the large amount of text dialogue is starting to become distracting as the competition has already evolved.

TrueNerdNovember 18, 2006

10 out of 10 is okay, but you could've scored the game higher. You could've invented the 11-point scale for this game and still scored it a 12. You could have done that, but your secret is out now, Metts. YOU'RE JEFF GERSTMANN IN DISGUISE!

Anyways, delicious review. Sometimes when I read reviews for this game I feel like I could complete the game in the time it takes to read them, but not this one. And I echo the thanks for not having any spoilers. PGC... er, NWR has been very good as a whole of not divulging any spoilers.

I can't believe I have to wait 12 more hours to play this game.

MarioAllStarNovember 18, 2006

Quote

Originally posted by: Jonnyboy117
The problem is that as more and more games start to use voice, the fact that Zelda does not becomes more conspicuous, and the reason you're seeing more complaints about it these days is that the large amount of text dialogue is starting to become distracting as the competition has already evolved.

Now I must admit that I have not played many games with large amounts voice acting (e.g., Final Fantasy), but wouldn't large amounts of text be better than large amounts of voice? One can certainly read faster than most people can talk.

KDR_11kNovember 18, 2006

Nintendo doesn't do voice acting because that means they can use one set of sound files for every version of the game instead of having to re-dub (hahaha, yeah, like Nintendo does that) it or having all characters talk English forcing people who don't speak that to read the text anyway (like in all the Mario games).

I love Wind Waker as much as anyone, but it's hard to deny that the game, for all its greatness, feels like something different from a true Zelda game.

Yes it's 3d but why do you single out Wind Waker for that?

Smoke39November 18, 2006

Quote

Originally posted by: MarioAllStar
I can't help but notice that almost every review I have glanced at mentions lack of voice acting. Am I the only one (aside from Miyamoto) who isn't a big fan of it?

No. I don't think it would suit the series.

Shin GallonNovember 18, 2006

This review confirms one thing: They should have put in a Gamecube control option. Anything less than perfection is unacceptable in a Zelda game, and bad timing on the sword controls is a game-breaker for me. As such I'll be experiencing this game on Gamecube.
Otherwise, it sounds like it might finally replace Link to the Past as the best game in the series. I can't wait till Dec. 11!

TJ SpykeNovember 18, 2006

Why? The only real difference between the GC and Wii versions are the controls and the Wii version having 16:9 support.

I'm gonna play Zelda tomorrow. Tonight I will play Wii Sports and mess around in the menu and then go to sleep.

blackfootstepsNovember 18, 2006

What? Sleep? Sleep is for the weak, go the all-nighter, you know you want to!

Bill AurionNovember 18, 2006

There has yet to be a game that I have played where I thought that it needed voice-acting, or if it has voice-acting, thought that the game would be any less entertaining if it wasn't in there...Voice acting is seriously a NON-ISSUE...

sycomonkeyNovember 18, 2006

I guess your defition of "Spoiler" and my definition of it are completely different. I'm kinda upset now, but I'll let it slide since it wasn't extremely spoilerific.

I guess I'll have to finish reading it tomorrow.

blackfootstepsNovember 18, 2006

When it comes to voice acting I usually end up skipping the spoken dialogue, prefering to read the subtitles instead. It's not the end of the world that voice acting is not included especially when we've known for ages that Z:TP wouldn't feature VA

PittbboiNovember 19, 2006

Great review. However, I do have one tiny little gripe: the score. The game has a lot going for it, and for most of your review the perfect score seems merited...until you get to the control issues. When I played Zelda briefly a while back I had the same issues, but I didn't think much of it because I was hoping they'd iron those obvious problems out before the official release. But, according to you, swordplay is still imprecise.

You say there are other aspects of the game that make up for it. But with controls being, inarguably I think, one of the MOST important aspects of a game, how can a game honestly deserve a perfect score with controls as imperfect as you say?

Overall though, I appreciate this review. It's very thorough, yet concise--one of the best reviews of the game out there, in my opinion. Combined with the new site, I really enjoy the format of the reviews. Everything is presented clearly on the page. All in all, this pretty much assures that Zelda: TP will rightfully be my first Wii purchase. Whether or not I get the Wii version or the GC version, however, remains to be seen.

I wonder what all these sites who give perfect reviews to a GC game on the Wii will give to the next Zelda, the first one built from ground up for the Wii hardware and not limited by all these doubts and nitpicks?

~Carmine M. Red
Kairon@aol.com

NinGurl69 *hugglesNovember 19, 2006

The newer "10" is greater than the old "10." When the bar is raised, meeting the bar won't garner a 10, it has to be exceeded. If a new natively-Wii Zelda will get any 10s, it has to exceed TP at the minimum. That's up to Nintendo.

Really, there are no "perfect scores" or "perfect reviews" unless there's 10s in all categories. A final 10 out of 10 means the reviewer thinks very highly of the game in comparison to the competition, not perfection.

But since TP is mainly a control adaption of classic controls, and considering games like Mario Galaxy and Prime 3 have more involving usage of the Remote in typical gameplay scenarios, there's a good bit of room in Zelda for new things. And of course there's extra gaffix power to throw around since TP is, visually, a GameCube game.

If TP is the serious, traditional Zelda we've supposedly waited for, I fully expect the next adventure to be another departure, much like Majora's Mask and Wind Waker.

KDR_11kNovember 19, 2006

I wonder what all these sites who give perfect reviews to a GC game on the Wii will give to the next Zelda, the first one built from ground up for the Wii hardware and not limited by all these doubts and nitpicks?

A perfect 10 because that's what you give Zelda?

The review numbers are sales recommendations (how strongly they recommend you buy it), they don't compare games to each other in any way other than the priority you should have for buying them.

NWR_pap64Pedro Hernandez, Contributing WriterNovember 19, 2006

You guys complained about the controls?!?!

YOU GUYS PHAIL! YOU DIE! YOU GO TO HELL AND YOU DIE!

Hehe, actually this is a nice review. Praised the game while being fair and pointing out flaws.

RequiemNovember 19, 2006

I don't understand the control issues.

Matt over at IGN couldn't praise the control issues more. He loves them. In fact, he said "there's no going back." I don't understand why you had such trouble using the controller, and he didn't.

mantidorNovember 19, 2006

I can't wait for this game, its unbearable to wait until december, even if I was getting the wii version, the console here is nowhere to be found, I was foolishly hoping we would have the same release date as NA, but it seems is not the case. GC version for me, I have no widescreen, no wii in the near future, and while TP wii will be players choice in a few months TP GC will become a rarity bidded at $200+ in Ebay.

sycomonkeyNovember 19, 2006

Quote

Originally posted by: sycomonkey
I guess your defition of "Spoiler" and my definition of it are completely different. I'm kinda upset now, but I'll let it slide since it wasn't extremely spoilerific.

I guess I'll have to finish reading it tomorrow.



Or, you know. Not. Since I don't have the game. Since there's not a single Wii available within 100 miles of Seattle.

damnit.

PolyethyleneNovember 19, 2006

Quote

Originally posted by: Requiem
I don't understand the control issues.

Matt over at IGN couldn't praise the control issues more. He loves them. In fact, he said "there's no going back." I don't understand why you had such trouble using the controller, and he didn't.

Not only Matt but like the 99% of the TP reviewers.

sycomonkey, what part do you consider a spoiler? I'm really surprised anyone would find something in the review that could be considered a spoiler. I was very careful not to mention anything that hasn't been shown in the E3 trailers or is seen within the first hour or two of the game.

Regarding control gripes:

I may have overstarted the problem in my review, but I tried to err on the side of caution. The sword usually works fine, although I did learn to make pretty hard movements with the Remote in order to get the sword working. And even then, every now and then, it still wouldn't come out. It is not a frequent problem, but it did cost me some hearts in key battles, and it's just the kind of problem that should not ever be present in a Zelda game.

However, this gripe did not affect my overall score because I do not feel that swordplay is a major part of the Zelda gameplay. These games are a mixture of exploration, puzzle solving, and combat, and the combat portions are shared with many other weapons beside the basic sword. Those other weapons, many of which use the pointer function of the Remote, work great. So this is ultimately an infrequent problem with a minor facet of the game, but it is unusual and unsettling enough that I wanted to warn people about it.

Bill AurionNovember 19, 2006

I just want to throw out there that I haven't had a single problem with the sword yet, and I'm 11 hours in...

mantidorNovember 19, 2006

hey, if Im not mistaken Bill is lefty so I can get some impressions from you with the game and overall the console! well it might not be the most unbiased opinion ever face-icon-small-wink.gif but I'm really interested in your opinion anyway. Unfortunately the review didn't adress that.

Bill AurionNovember 19, 2006

The Wiimote is light enough that it isn't an issue... face-icon-small-smile.gif

KlapauciusNovember 19, 2006

8/10 for controls? Add 2 if you'll be playing the Gamecube version (like me). :P

^_^

Bill AurionNovember 19, 2006

Aha, if you tried bow aiming on the Wii version, you'd never go back to analog controls ever again...

KlapauciusNovember 19, 2006

Quote

Originally posted by: Bill Aurion
Aha, if you tried bow aiming on the Wii version, you'd never go back to analog controls ever again...


Maybe, as a novelty, but I don't think it can be as quick or as intuitive (maybe, after a lot of practice...) as playing Zelda with a normal GCN pad.

If and when I eventually get a Wii, I may pick up TP for the novelty of the Wii controls. But really, I'm sticking to what I know for the game I know. I don't want to be fumbling around aiming my wrist at little specks on a screen, when I know I can do it in a split second using an analogue stick. face-icon-small-smile.gif

Smoke39November 20, 2006

Aiming sounds appealing, but sword fighting still sounds a bit off. And that fairy pointer is like the stupidest thing ever, seriously. I'd still get the game if there were only the Wii version, but since there's still the option, I think I'll be getting the 'Cube version. My dad's getting the Wii version for himself, so I'll still have a chance to play it if I really want to, anyway.

mantidorNovember 20, 2006

Quote

Originally posted by: Bill Aurion
The Wiimote is light enough that it isn't an issue... face-icon-small-smile.gif


errr... I think you didn't understand my question, I just want to know how as a lefty you hold the remote+nunchuck and if it matters in Zelda and other games.

UniversalJuanNovember 20, 2006

Um yeah...barbaric analog sticks and buttons are beneath me now, at least for Zelda. Whereas you doubters will try Zelda wii for novelty? Us who have actually been playing Zelda on Wii will try the GameCube version for novelty sake (If I can even bring myself to care about the Cube version...holy crap was this worth a 2 year wait!) Seriously, I can play with my head resting on my left hand as I play. I didn't even know I wanted to play games like that, heh but that's just a silly point ;x!

WindyManSteven Rodriguez, Staff AlumnusNovember 20, 2006

Quote

Originally posted by: Klapaucius
Quote

Originally posted by: Bill Aurion
Aha, if you tried bow aiming on the Wii version, you'd never go back to analog controls ever again...


Maybe, as a novelty, but I don't think it can be as quick or as intuitive (maybe, after a lot of practice...) as playing Zelda with a normal GCN pad.

If and when I eventually get a Wii, I may pick up TP for the novelty of the Wii controls. But really, I'm sticking to what I know for the game I know. I don't want to be fumbling around aiming my wrist at little specks on a screen, when I know I can do it in a split second using an analogue stick. face-icon-small-smile.gif


If you can do it in a split second with an analog stick, then you can do it in a split of a split second with the remote. I can gun down two or three people in a second very easily with the remote. People can do that with a stick too, but it takes practice and luck. You don't need either with the remote.

KlapauciusNovember 20, 2006

I'd never have reckoned the whole Wiimote / Analogue thing would cause a rift between Nintendo gamers... :/

wanderingNovember 20, 2006

Quote

errr... I think you didn't understand my question, I just want to know how as a lefty you hold the remote+nunchuck and if it matters in Zelda and other games.

I'm a righty, but I tried aiming with my left hand, and didn't find it that hard.

Quote

sword fighting still sounds a bit off.

I didn't really like the sword controls....until my first enemy came running towards me, and, adrenaline rushing, heart pounding, I swung, and hit him him, again and again. As I did so, found myself filling with rage, and swinging more and more furiously. And when he fell, I said to myself: 'ah, so that's what it feels like to kill someone on the battlefield.'

NinGurl69 *hugglesNovember 20, 2006

Quote

Originally posted by: Klapaucius
I'd never have reckoned the whole Wiimote / Analogue thing would cause a rift between Nintendo gamers... :/


AHAAHHAHAHHAHAHHAHAHA

This is fantastic.

mantidorNovember 20, 2006

As someone who is so against the wii version there's no doubt in my mind aiming is a million times better with the remote, the only question would be if the game is just easier or if its difficulty was adjusted to meet this new more intuitive method. I guess it wasn't.

RickPowersRick Powers, Staff AlumnusNovember 20, 2006

I have to say that I haven't had any issues with controlling the sword either. A little shake, and it comes right out when I need it. In fact, it's sensitive enough where it comes out when I don't want it to sometimes, but that doesn't really effect anything. If Jonny was having issues with that, I'd have to think that there might be some wireless interference in his play location, or possibly a defective accellerometer in the Wiimote.

Quote

Originally posted by: Klapaucius
Quote

Originally posted by: Bill Aurion
Aha, if you tried bow aiming on the Wii version, you'd never go back to analog controls ever again...


Maybe, as a novelty, but I don't think it can be as quick or as intuitive (maybe, after a lot of practice...) as playing Zelda with a normal GCN pad.

If and when I eventually get a Wii, I may pick up TP for the novelty of the Wii controls. But really, I'm sticking to what I know for the game I know. I don't want to be fumbling around aiming my wrist at little specks on a screen, when I know I can do it in a split second using an analogue stick. face-icon-small-smile.gif


Statements like this before someone has used the Wiimote in this game just crack me up. It's normal to distrust something so new that you can't quite get your head around it. That's fine. But the fact is, until you actually pick it up and try it, you really have no idea how intuitive and comfortable it is. And if you aren't convinced by the ridiculously high scores that Zelda's getting, or by all the people telling you how much better the Wiimote is than the old analog sticks, then all I can really tell you is to find a friend who has it and try it for yourself. Give it half and hour, and I swear to you that you're going to wonder how you could have ever doubted us.

KDR_11kNovember 21, 2006

I think it's a lot more intuitive to use gestures than buttons but we are gamers so we're used to buttons and don't have the learning curve for them anymore.

Quote

Originally posted by: RickPowers
I have to say that I haven't had any issues with controlling the sword either. A little shake, and it comes right out when I need it. In fact, it's sensitive enough where it comes out when I don't want it to sometimes, but that doesn't really effect anything. If Jonny was having issues with that, I'd have to think that there might be some wireless interference in his play location, or possibly a defective accellerometer in the Wiimote.


The batteries in my first remote died halfway through the game, so I switched to my other remote. So I don't think it's any kind of defect. I understand why Nintendo turned down the sensitivity; they didn't want Link to be brandishing his sword when you are simply trying to move the pointer around or changing hand positions. But they overdid it for me. I'm glad to hear that many people aren't having any problems with it, but I did on occasion, and that's why I think the sensitivity should be adjustable.

chrisbg99November 23, 2006

I've had a different problem with Zelda's sword play. It is almost too sensitive.

bubicusNovember 23, 2006

There is an adjustment system in TP that allows you to modify the sensitivity. I found the default controls were too stiff for me when swordfighting, so I went to the options menu, calibrated the sensitivity to my preferences, and now the controls are pretty sensitive... sensitive enough to cause the sword to pop out sometimes with slight but sudden movements to the left and right, but not so sensitive that the sword would pop out when aiming or slowly moving the Wiimote.

(In the settings system, it's the adjustment thing with the circle and the crosshairs.)


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The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess Box Art

Genre Adventure
Developer Nintendo
Players1

Worldwide Releases

na: The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess
Release Nov 19, 2006
PublisherNintendo
RatingTeen
jpn: The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess
Release Dec 02, 2006
PublisherNintendo
Rating12+
eu: The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess
Release Dec 08, 2007
PublisherNintendo
Rating12+
aus: The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess
Release Dec 07, 2007
PublisherNintendo
RatingMature
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