DS

North America

The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass

by Michael Cole - November 12, 2007, 7:55 am PST
Total comments: 46

8

Is the hourglass half empty or half full?

When Nintendo said Twilight Princess would be the last Zelda as we knew the series, I wasn't sure what to think. Now that Phantom Hourglass has been released, I'm still not sure what to think. While this DS game provides many clever additions and twists to the Zelda universe, it also stumbles where its brethren are usually strongest, making it among the weakest of the Zelda games.

Phantom Hourglass introduces a refreshing new control scheme, with some growing pains. Using the stylus to control both movement and attacks feels natural and intuitive. Tap a baddy to charge towards it and attack. Draw a circle for a spin attack. Pull out your map and write notes or doodle! While I initially felt as though I was playing Animal Crossing Wild World, I quickly adjusted and grew to love this slick new setup. The controls out at sea, which consist of drawing a route on the map, then defending your ship with your cannon, are also surprisingly entertaining. The D-pad (or face buttons for lefties) is optional but useful for quickly opening a menu, and the currently selected item (e.g. your boomerang) is at the ready with either shoulder button in conjunction with the stylus. In fact, the touch screen equivalents are counterproductive: inadvertent taps of on-screen buttons are an annoyance, and intentional taps are still less convenient than the D-pad and trigger finger shortcuts. Other minor control quips include being vulnerable when accessing the item menu, since the game doesn't pause, and that the roll gesture rarely registers.

The Wind Waker presentation also pays off on the DS. Sure, the game has some blurry textures (Link's eyebrows look really weird when the camera zooms in), but the cel-shading looks awesome. Even when seven or eight enemies are on the screen, or the game renders 3D on both screens, Phantom Hourglass rarely slows down. Lighthearted storytelling with amusing dialog—especially between Celia the fairy and the self-centered pansy, Linebeck—keeps the plot interesting in spite of its simplicity.

Unfortunately, like in Zelda 2 for the NES, the series-defying risks don't always pay off, and the game's quality therefore slips. The game unnecessarily strives to justify its touch screen controls through many puzzles that rely on the same basic premises of making note of a solution or hint on your map, then somehow using that note later. At first it's cute, but Phantom Hourglass has far too many push-in-this-order puzzles with solutions revealed on nearby stone tablets. The presence of such tasteless puzzles in Super Paper Mario and now Phantom Hourglass is rather discomforting, as they should be beneath Nintendo. Dungeons are also significantly shorter than in prior Zelda games—I completed one of the later dungeons in fifteen minutes. The only exception, the Temple of the Ocean King, emphasizes what remains the series' weakest game mechanic: stealth. While one could argue shorter dungeons are appropriate for a handheld game, dungeon length wasn't a problem for the prior four Zelda portables, and Phantom Hourglass doesn't really offer more dungeons to deliver a comparable amount of content. What's more, for the first time since A Link to the Past, dungeons recycle the same music. In fact, most of the game's music, including the dungeon music, is unbelievably boring!

All things considered, Phantom Hourglass is still an enjoyable game. Eiji Aonuma and his team clearly worked hard to reinvent Zelda for a new era; only to some extent, the Phantom Hourglass team threw the baby out with the bathwater. Hopefully Nintendo can retain Phantom Hourglass's victories while reclaiming the series' historic strengths as it sails into its next big Zelda game.

Score

Graphics Sound Control Gameplay Lastability Final
9 7 8.5 8 7 8
Graphics
9

At times the textures are pixilated, and Link's expressions and the sea don't have the zest found in The Wind Waker, but the game is still vibrant and very impressive for the platform. The Animal Crossing camera angle works well when exploring on foot, and the boss battles spanning both screens look fantastic.

Sound
7

Why has Nintendo forsaken me with such a mediocre soundtrack? With so many memorable portable Zelda soundtracks from both Flagship and Nintendo, this game's music is a disgrace. One bland dungeon theme shared amongst many dungeons? Similarly repetitive cave and island background notes? For shame! Even the enjoyable sailing theme is reused on the title screen. At least there's some quality battle music, some of which is reprised from The Wind Waker.

Control
8.5

The Link to the Past formula, while solid, was starting to grow fatigued and gimmicky; Phantom Hourglass's touch screen controls are innovative and fun, both on and off the boat. However, the menu buttons on the touch screen can get in the way, especially in a fierce fight, and it is very difficult to execute a roll attack.

Gameplay
8

The touch screen controls open up many new possibilities, and Phantom Hourglass isn't afraid to reinvent items such as the boomerang and bombchu to better leverage the new interface. Boss battles are regularly invigorating. Unfortunately, clever controls are no substitute for good level design: frequent lackluster puzzles and very short dungeons detract from the experience.

Lastability
7

The main adventure is fairly short at 10 to 15 hours, and without heart pieces, there aren't all that many side-quests to explore. Of course, side quests have never been as prominent in the portable Zelda games as their console brethren, anyway. Between the optional treasure hunting, ship part collecting, fishing, and mildly amusing multiplayer, completists should have enough to do.

Final
8

Phantom Hourglass fosters the same love-hate relationship as Sonic Adventure 2: some parts are great fun, while others will leave many players cringing. At times it is brilliant, and overall the good outweighs the bad, but not by as much as you'd expect from a Zelda game.

Summary

Pros
  • Bold and enjoyable new control schemes
  • Fun boss battles
  • Great graphics
  • Many traditional Zelda items reinvented
Cons
  • Disappointing jot-this-down-for-later puzzles
  • Short dungeons
  • Touch screen menus and buttons sometimes inconvenient
  • Weak soundtrack
Review Page 2: Conclusion

Talkback

SheckyNovember 12, 2007

I'd rather have PH method instead of collecting Photos/Kinstones/Figurines/etc...

king of snakeNovember 12, 2007

As far as the rolling gesture goes:

They tell you to make "little circles" at the edge of the screen, but really all you need to do is scribble the stylus back and forth at the edge of the screen. It works great.

stedamanNovember 12, 2007

Bleh, needless to say I disagree again with this....quality game..controls are perfect..at least a 9 face-icon-small-happy.gif

RizeDavid Trammell, Staff AlumnusNovember 12, 2007

I started playing the game and quit. I'm sure I'll pick it up later, but with all the better games out right now it's going to have to wait. Then again, I never did get past the first level in Star Fox. The presentation is flawless as usual for Nintendo and I appreciate that, but I'm just not feeling the game. The stylus keeps getting in the way of my vision and the stock stylus isn't long enough to comfortably use it on all parts of the screen.

KDR_11kNovember 12, 2007

After I started playing I didn't put another game into my DS until I beat PH.

RizeDavid Trammell, Staff AlumnusNovember 12, 2007

I really just don't like the stylus control. It works fine, I just don't like the feel of it. It really disconnects you from the game having a giant stylus (in comparison to the characters on the screen) between you and the action.

UncleBobRichard Cook, Guest ContributorNovember 12, 2007

I like the game and disagree with a lot of this review, but I do respect it. Well written.

GoldenPhoenixNovember 12, 2007

Strike two against Phantom Hourglass, ah how sweet it is!

I think the only disconnect is in your head, and that maybe if you simply played the game and left the analysis for later, you'd find that the stylus is a major non-issue. I never had any issue with the controls taking me out of the game, and I use an even bigger stylus than you: the log stylus that came as a pre-order bonus to Lost in Blue 2.

GoldenPhoenixNovember 12, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Kairon
I think the only disconnect is in your head, and that maybe if you simply played the game and left the analysis for later, you'd find that the stylus is a major non-issue. I never had any issue with the controls taking me out of the game, and I use an even bigger stylus than you: the log stylus that came as a pre-order bonus to Lost in Blue 2.


Gee really, a disconnect in your head? I thought it was liver that was disconnected. Now your going to tell me that "fun" is all in my head.

Quote

Originally posted by: NewsBot
The game unnecessarily strives to justify its touch screen controls through many puzzles that rely on the same basic premises of making note of a solution or hint on your map, then somehow using that note later. At first it's cute, but Phantom Hourglass has far too many push-in-this-order puzzles with solutions revealed on nearby stone tablets. The presence of such tasteless puzzles in Super Paper Mario and now Phantom Hourglass is rather discomforting, as they should be beneath Nintendo.


I disagree heartily. In contrast, I found that the game actually held back from using pull-in-this-order puzzles. There may be just 6 types of puzzles like this in the entire game, possibly less, so how can there be "too many?" Actually, there are a variety of wonderful new puzzle types involving this ingenious draw-on-your-map feature, from connecting pairs of landmarks on the map to create intersecting lines, to feeding the player where un-marked stuff can be found in the ocean or on other islands (draw your own X, and any accompanying notes), to outlining invisible features that don't show up on the map to begin with. If anything, the game didn't use these innovative puzzles enough!

Quote

Originally posted by: GoldenPhoenix
Quote

Originally posted by: Kairon
I think the only disconnect is in your head, and that maybe if you simply played the game and left the analysis for later, you'd find that the stylus is a major non-issue. I never had any issue with the controls taking me out of the game, and I use an even bigger stylus than you: the log stylus that came as a pre-order bonus to Lost in Blue 2.


Gee really, a disconnect in your head? I thought it was liver that was disconnected. Now your going to tell me that "fun" is all in my head.


Well, if I can use a LOG stylus and not be discomfitted, is it really the stylus that's the problem?

GoldenPhoenixNovember 12, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Kairon
Quote

Originally posted by: NewsBot
The game unnecessarily strives to justify its touch screen controls through many puzzles that rely on the same basic premises of making note of a solution or hint on your map, then somehow using that note later. At first it's cute, but Phantom Hourglass has far too many push-in-this-order puzzles with solutions revealed on nearby stone tablets. The presence of such tasteless puzzles in Super Paper Mario and now Phantom Hourglass is rather discomforting, as they should be beneath Nintendo.


I disagree heartily. In contrast, I found that the game actually held back from using pull-in-this-order puzzles. There may be just 6 types of puzzles like this in the entire game, possibly less, so how can there be "too many?" Actually, there are a variety of wonderful new puzzle types involving this ingenious draw-on-your-map feature, from connecting pairs of landmarks on the map to create intersecting lines, to feeding the player where un-marked stuff can be found in the ocean or on other islands (draw your own X, and any accompanying notes), to outlining invisible features that don't show up on the map to begin with. If anything, the game didn't use these innovative puzzles enough!


Drawing lines has been used in connect the dots, all these are is an interactive connect the dots, meaning they are NOT innovative. So take that Catbus man!

GoldenPhoenixNovember 12, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Kairon
Quote

Originally posted by: GoldenPhoenix
Quote

Originally posted by: Kairon
I think the only disconnect is in your head, and that maybe if you simply played the game and left the analysis for later, you'd find that the stylus is a major non-issue. I never had any issue with the controls taking me out of the game, and I use an even bigger stylus than you: the log stylus that came as a pre-order bonus to Lost in Blue 2.


Gee really, a disconnect in your head? I thought it was liver that was disconnected. Now your going to tell me that "fun" is all in my head.


Well, if I can use a LOG stylus and not be discomfitted, is it really the stylus that's the problem?


You could be mentally deranged as well. face-icon-small-wink.gif

Quote

Originally posted by: GoldenPhoenix
Quote

Originally posted by: Kairon
Quote

Originally posted by: NewsBot
The game unnecessarily strives to justify its touch screen controls through many puzzles that rely on the same basic premises of making note of a solution or hint on your map, then somehow using that note later. At first it's cute, but Phantom Hourglass has far too many push-in-this-order puzzles with solutions revealed on nearby stone tablets. The presence of such tasteless puzzles in Super Paper Mario and now Phantom Hourglass is rather discomforting, as they should be beneath Nintendo.


I disagree heartily. In contrast, I found that the game actually held back from using pull-in-this-order puzzles. There may be just 6 types of puzzles like this in the entire game, possibly less, so how can there be "too many?" Actually, there are a variety of wonderful new puzzle types involving this ingenious draw-on-your-map feature, from connecting pairs of landmarks on the map to create intersecting lines, to feeding the player where un-marked stuff can be found in the ocean or on other islands (draw your own X, and any accompanying notes), to outlining invisible features that don't show up on the map to begin with. If anything, the game didn't use these innovative puzzles enough!


Drawing lines has been used in connect the dots, all these are is an interactive connect the dots, meaning they are NOT innovative. So take that Catbus man!


Innovation isn't always the creation of something never seen before, it's often the ABSTRACTION and SYNTHESIS of stuff that already exists, but realized in new and interesting ways.

For example, the wiimote itself isn't very new. Nintendo didn't do magic, they just used stuff that ALREADY EXISTED and applied them to gaming, they've said it themselves. And take a look at the Sims! It's playing DOLL HOUSE! That's what EA even called the prikject internally for awhile, dollhouse! Sims is nothing but playing with dolls... on your computer! And it's often heralded as the most innovative game to come along in a long while!

Bottomline is, there are many ways that PH innovates and presents new puzzle types that take great advantage and actually whets the appetite for more of this innovative feature. Someone should take it further, because as a kid I've always wanted to create my own hidden pirate treasure map, and PH takes me one step closer to doing so.

BTW kids, you can use lemon juice to write invisible clues on paper! Write out or draw on the paper using lemon juice, and no one will see what is written. But get an adult to use a flame to heat up the paper, and your writing will magically appear! Your very own secret invisible ink for notes or treasure maps! *never attempt without parental guidance*

Quote

Originally posted by: GoldenPhoenix
You could be mentally deranged as well. face-icon-small-wink.gif


T_T

Nick DiMolaNick DiMola, Staff AlumnusNovember 12, 2007

This is one of those games that as I play it more I like it less. Most games don't do this to me. It was a pretty weak Zelda entry and if this is the direction Nintendo intends to take Zelda, count me out.

DAaaMan64November 12, 2007

Love this game = no love for the review :P

But hey whatever.

Quote

Originally posted by: Kairon
Quote

Originally posted by: NewsBot
The game unnecessarily strives to justify its touch screen controls through many puzzles that rely on the same basic premises of making note of a solution or hint on your map, then somehow using that note later. At first it's cute, but Phantom Hourglass has far too many push-in-this-order puzzles with solutions revealed on nearby stone tablets. The presence of such tasteless puzzles in Super Paper Mario and now Phantom Hourglass is rather discomforting, as they should be beneath Nintendo.


I disagree heartily. In contrast, I found that the game actually held back from using pull-in-this-order puzzles. There may be just 6 types of puzzles like this in the entire game, possibly less, so how can there be "too many?" Actually, there are a variety of wonderful new puzzle types involving this ingenious draw-on-your-map feature, from connecting pairs of landmarks on the map to create intersecting lines, to feeding the player where un-marked stuff can be found in the ocean or on other islands (draw your own X, and any accompanying notes), to outlining invisible features that don't show up on the map to begin with. If anything, the game didn't use these innovative puzzles enough!


Actually, I was grouping all the puzzles you just mentioned together into that category. I shouldn't have used push-in-this-order as the description here in my review. Walk-in-this-order and dig-right-here were really intended in that statement as well.

Also, thank you for not attacking me (yet), merely disagreeing with my review. I hardly expect everyone to agree with me, because I know there were a lot of people angry at Zach. I just felt this game deserved another review on the site, and others on staff who promised to write one have yet to do so.

Quote

Originally posted by: TheYoungerPlumber
Actually, I was grouping all the puzzles you just mentioned together into that category. I shouldn't have used push-in-this-order as the description here in my review. Walk-in-this-order and dig-right-here were really intended in that statement as well.

Also, thank you for not attacking me (yet), merely disagreeing with my review. I hardly expect everyone to agree with me, because I know there were a lot of people angry at Zach. I just felt this game deserved another review on the site, and others on staff who promised to write one have yet to do so.


Well, if you'd like me to I can try to devolve this thread into a flame fest! Just give the word and your faithful NWR forumites will converge on the thread like a swarm of locusts on a virgin field! &>

*continues to grumble about how the puzzles were actually new and unique and how everyone's lost touch with their inner child*

GoldenPhoenixNovember 12, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Kairon


*continues to grumble about how the puzzles were actually new and unique and how everyone's lost touch with their inner child*


Wow, just wow. Then again I guess if you meant the puzzles were dumb enough for little kids, then I'd probably agree (j/k). Seriously though it has nothing to do with losing touch with your inner child. If a puzzle sucks or isn't that innovative, I don't think it has anything to do with that.

On another note, I personally think PH will be one of the most divisive Zelda's ever, while there were detractors in regards to TP it was overwhelmingly accepted, but PH seems to be splitting people. Now I wouldn't say it is Zelda 2 esque splitting but it still appears to be there.

*points to his Sonic Adventure 2 love-hate statement*

I think that we should have a Hot Topic about why Phantom hourglass is so divisive. It definitely isn't as obvious as why Zelda II was, and the reasons behind Phantom hourglass could come from many different areas, such as franchise fatigue, generational gap, the parallel innovation of touch screen controls, the pull (or lack of) of Zelda into RPG-esque content and stylings, and other things.

GoldenPhoenixNovember 12, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Kairon
I think that we should have a Hot Topic about why Phantom hourglass is so divisive. It definitely isn't as obvious as why Zelda II was, and the reasons behind Phantom hourglass could come from many different areas, such as franchise fatigue, generational gap, the parallel innovation of touch screen controls, the pull (or lack of) of Zelda into RPG-esque content and stylings, and other things.


Actually I think it is the touch controls and how they suck for a game like this. No need for a hot topic. face-icon-small-wink.gif

Quote

Originally posted by: GoldenPhoenix
Actually I think it is the touch controls and how they suck for a game like this. No need for a hot topic. face-icon-small-wink.gif


AAARRRGGGHHHH!!!!!

NWR_pap64Pedro Hernandez, Contributing WriterNovember 12, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: GoldenPhoenix
On another note, I personally think PH will be one of the most divisive Zelda's ever, while there were detractors in regards to TP it was overwhelmingly accepted, but PH seems to be splitting people. Now I wouldn't say it is Zelda 2 esque splitting but it still appears to be there.


Wind Waker says hi... face-icon-small-wink.gif

GoldenPhoenixNovember 12, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: pap64
Quote

Originally posted by: GoldenPhoenix
On another note, I personally think PH will be one of the most divisive Zelda's ever, while there were detractors in regards to TP it was overwhelmingly accepted, but PH seems to be splitting people. Now I wouldn't say it is Zelda 2 esque splitting but it still appears to be there.


Wind Waker says hi... face-icon-small-wink.gif


I wouldn't even say that, people's complaints about Wind Waker really had nothing to do with controls nor even really the gameplay. Zelda: PH though has a wide gap between those that like the touch controls and those who do not. Some of us find the gameplay overly simplified and bare bones while others think it is just right. Wind Waker's main complaints were over ocean travel, triforce quest, and lack of dungeons. Besides PH has a lower overrall score than Wind Waker!

NWR_pap64Pedro Hernandez, Contributing WriterNovember 12, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: GoldenPhoenix
Quote

Originally posted by: pap64
Quote

Originally posted by: GoldenPhoenix
On another note, I personally think PH will be one of the most divisive Zelda's ever, while there were detractors in regards to TP it was overwhelmingly accepted, but PH seems to be splitting people. Now I wouldn't say it is Zelda 2 esque splitting but it still appears to be there.


Wind Waker says hi... face-icon-small-wink.gif


I wouldn't even say that, people's complaints about Wind Waker really had nothing to do with controls nor even really the gameplay. Zelda: PH though has a wide gap between those that like the touch controls and those who do not. Some of us find the gameplay overly simplified and bare bones while others think it is just right. Wind Waker's main complaints were over ocean travel, triforce quest, and lack of dungeons. Besides PH has a lower overrall score than Wind Waker!


But still, it was a rather dividing Zelda game, causing perhaps one of the biggest Nintendo controversies in history.

GoldenPhoenixNovember 12, 2007

What do you mean biggest controversy in Nintendo's history? The cell shading? That pretty much died off after the game was released, the only ones that complained about it afterwards tended to be people who didn't like Zelda much in the first place!

Nick DiMolaNick DiMola, Staff AlumnusNovember 12, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: GoldenPhoenix
Actually I think it is the touch controls and how they suck for a game like this. No need for a hot topic. face-icon-small-wink.gif


Quote

Originally posted by: GoldenPhoenix
What do you mean biggest controversy in Nintendo's history? The cell shading? That pretty much died off after the game was released, the only ones that complained about it afterwards tended to be people who didn't like Zelda much in the first place!


Agreed and Agreed. Oh and the fact that it is the most boring linear Zelda adventure ever (PH that is, not WW).

RizeDavid Trammell, Staff AlumnusNovember 12, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Kairon
I think the only disconnect is in your head, and that maybe if you simply played the game and left the analysis for later, you'd find that the stylus is a major non-issue. I never had any issue with the controls taking me out of the game, and I use an even bigger stylus than you: the log stylus that came as a pre-order bonus to Lost in Blue 2.


Becoming immersed in a hand-held game is quite difficult to begin with. Headphones and turning off the lights help. Having to use a stylus on the screen that the action takes place on pretty much ruins any immersion though. Sure I could simply play a game, but that's not as much fun as connecting with the game world deeply while playing it.

Quote

Originally posted by: Rize
Becoming immersed in a hand-held game is quite difficult to begin with. Headphones and turning off the lights help. Having to use a stylus on the screen that the action takes place on pretty much ruins any immersion though. Sure I could simply play a game, but that's not as much fun as connecting with the game world deeply while playing it.


So is this a criticism of handheld gaming in general, or a criticism of the DS in general? Either way, it sounds as if it isn't the game's fault, and is a situation that should logically arise in any game that makes use of the stylus extensively.

But even then the complaint doesn't appear in NWR's review of Trauma Center, which required frequent jabbings of the stylus to various sides of the screen, possibly obscuring views, nor is the criticism anywhere in sight in NWR's impressions on Ninja Gaiden DS, where the stylus slashing-on-enemies-tapping-on-places-to-move-towards has been praised.

I just can't believe the argument that simply using a stylus breaks immersion or blocks the screen, I don't think it is a criticism that has backing.

Quote

Originally posted by: Mr. Jack
Oh and the fact that it is the most boring linear Zelda adventure ever (PH that is, not WW).


*shakes fist* Wind Waker deserves that title!

GoldenPhoenixNovember 12, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Kairon
Quote

Originally posted by: Rize
Becoming immersed in a hand-held game is quite difficult to begin with. Headphones and turning off the lights help. Having to use a stylus on the screen that the action takes place on pretty much ruins any immersion though. Sure I could simply play a game, but that's not as much fun as connecting with the game world deeply while playing it.


So is this a criticism of handheld gaming in general, or a criticism of the DS in general? Either way, it sounds as if it isn't the game's fault, and is a situation that should logically arise in any game that makes use of the stylus extensively.

But even then the complaint doesn't appear in NWR's review of Trauma Center, which required frequent jabbings of the stylus to various sides of the screen, possibly obscuring views, nor is the criticism anywhere in sight in NWR's impressions on Ninja Gaiden DS, where the stylus slashing-on-enemies-tapping-on-places-to-move-towards has been praised.

I just can't believe the argument that simply using a stylus breaks immersion or blocks the screen, I don't think it is a criticism that has backing.

Quote

Originally posted by: Mr. Jack
Oh and the fact that it is the most boring linear Zelda adventure ever (PH that is, not WW).


*shakes fist* Wind Waker deserves that title!


Wind Waker may have alot of complaints but it being linear was not one of them, heck most were the opposite, it was TOO open. Besides that it had tons of side quests to do, not to mention that even with its limited dungeon count, they were still far more complex and long than PH. Also I think I would drop the Trauma Center comparison because YOU are the character doing the operation, in PH you are controlling a character, there is a BIG difference. Ninja Gaiden DS, we shall see but I am not going to hold my breath.

But GP, ALL Zeldas are linear. Well, maybe not the first one, but the rest are linear games dressed up with things to distract you from the simple fact.

And I guess we'll see whether the same criticisms for Zelda: PH's critically-acclaimed control scheme rear up in Ninja Gaiden DS.

GoldenPhoenixNovember 12, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Kairon
But GP, ALL Zeldas are linear. Well, maybe not the first one, but the rest are linear games dressed up with things to distract you from the simple fact.

And I guess we'll see whether the same criticisms for Zelda: PH's critically-acclaimed control scheme rear up in Ninja Gaiden DS.


Critically acclaimed 89% control scheme.

Actually, let me just clarify, I agree with a lot of TYP's review. It may seem like all this controversy stemmed from that, but it hasn't! This is just me never letting go of a meaty piece of discussion and chewing and chewing and rrarrgmmmuffin!

GoldenPhoenixNovember 12, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: Kairon
Actually, let me just clarify, I agree with a lot of TYP's review. It may seem like all this controversy stemmed from that, but it hasn't! This is just me never letting go of a meaty piece of discussion and chewing and chewing and rrarrgmmmuffin!


Better be careful I may get serious! (Ok maybe not).

MashiroNovember 12, 2007

Zelda PH ruined any chance of me picking up Ninja Giaden DS that's for sure.

IceColdNovember 12, 2007

Pssh. Immersion is way overrated. I'm not immersed in console games any more than I am in handheld ones, but I don't care about immersion.

GoldenPhoenixNovember 12, 2007

Quote

Originally posted by: IceCold
Pssh. Immersion is way overrated. I'm not immersed in console games any more than I am in handheld ones, but I don't care about immersion.


It is all in your mind. So TAKE THAT.

thatguyFebruary 20, 2008

I think the biggest problem with this game is the lack of a decent overworld to explore.  I've taken a look into it, and really, I'm surprised you didn't make a bigger deal about this, TYP.  Don't get me wrong, I agree with several review points, but the game doesn't seem like an adventure to me, which should be a major Zelda feature, and I think the game should have been knocked down a point or two just for that.

GoldenPhoenixFebruary 20, 2008

I think Zelda should have at least these components:

1. Exploration/Secrets
2. Dungeons
3. Item/Weapon
4. Boss fights
5. Action gameplay instead of turn based
6. A sword as primary weapon

PH had all of these but I think it skimped on the exploration.

There wasn't a huge amount of exploration in PH, but it had a vastly higher land-to-water ration than WW, and it used its land portions exceptionally well, giving you exploration puzzles in each island, sometimes exceptionally well.

GoldenPhoenixFebruary 21, 2008

Quote from: Kairon

There wasn't a huge amount of exploration in PH, but it had a vastly higher land-to-water ration than WW, and it used its land portions exceptionally well, giving you exploration puzzles in each island, sometimes exceptionally well.

Was it exceptionally entertaining?

KDR_11kFebruary 21, 2008

Yes, moreso than your posts.

CalibanFebruary 21, 2008

rofl

Share + Bookmark





The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass Box Art

Genre Adventure
Developer Nintendo
Players1 - 2
Online1 - 2

Worldwide Releases

na: The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass
Release Oct 01, 2007
PublisherNintendo
RatingEveryone 10+
jpn: Zelda no Densetsu: Mugen no Sunadokei
Release Jun 23, 2007
PublisherNintendo
RatingAll Ages
eu: The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass
Release Oct 19, 2007
PublisherNintendo
Rating7+
aus: The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass
Release Oct 11, 2007
PublisherNintendo
RatingGeneral
Got a news tip? Send it in!
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement