DS

North America

Metroid Prime: Hunters

by Evan Burchfield - March 22, 2006, 9:04 am PST
Total comments: 10

The new wave of Wi-Fi games has arrived. Here is a quick rundown of how online battle works and why it's oh so awesome.

After an evening of battles with fellow staffers and a few readers, it's not that hard to say that Metroid Prime: Hunters has the deathmatch options of a Quake game, with a Nintendo twist. Anyone who complained about the constricting Wi-Fi play of Mario Kart should look into MP:H's multiplayer – it's entirely flexible and feature-laden, but there are a couple hoops you must jump through to get there. When you first log in you won't have any friends; you can play a random match with up to three other people, and you can only play straight “Battle" mode. Once you've played with someone, you can add them to your “Rivals" list if they agree. This allows you to play with them in any of the other modes with very adaptable level options (team play, points and time limits, a few weapons options). However, you cannot voice or even text chat with anyone on your Rivals list. This list is intended only for strangers you meet online but have agreed to battle with. Your list can hold up to sixty people, effectively replicating an “open-system" for finding combatants. If you have the friend code for a rival, you can upgrade him to friend, which enables voice and text chat. Now, if your friend list is limited, you needn't worry. If your friend is hosting a match and several of his friends are joining, you can still join, sans any chat features. After the match, you can add them to your rivals list.

So far the Wi-Fi connection has been stable. I personally have encountered a few “Connection Error" resets, and a reboot of the DS solves the problem. However, Tetris DS has also been having connection problems of a much larger sort, indicating that Nintendo's servers might not be prepared for a high volume of gamers. Time will tell if these issues can be resolved. Voice chat in Hunters works very well, though you do have to get your mouth pretty close to the mic. The voice chat option, as Bloodworth has reported, functions as a walkie talkie, except it is possible for two people to hold down their “talk" buttons at once and have a flowing conversation – this is not preferred since there is a persistent echo. There's a text chat option that slightly interrupts your game by taking you to a completely different screen and gives you no confirmation that the other person received the message. Steven (WindyMan) wisely pointed out that a chat window would have been appropriate.

Since you can join games hosted by your friends or rivals, getting the exact players you want in a match is not hard. You can even limit whether you want the game to be open to just friends, just rivals, or both. It is possible that someone on your friends list could join a game when you don't want them to, but heck, with voice chat you can tell 'em to get out! We were able to play with each other with minimal problems. The main difficulty is the friend code, but even that's a minor hassle. (Fill up on friend codes and post your own in our WiFi forum.) Tournaments and planned events do not seem out of the question with MP:H.

As for the actual gameplay and fun factor, we'll be leaving that to the full game review. Until that time, if it's multiplayer that has you on the fence about Metroid Prime: Hunters, get off the fence and run, quickly, towards the greenest online pasture Nintendo's offered yet.

Talkback

Smash_BrotherMarch 22, 2006

And I was like "BOOM!!!! HEADSHOT!!!!"

...But then he hit me with a charged magmaul and I died. face-icon-small-sad.gif

BloodworthDaniel Bloodworth, Staff AlumnusMarch 22, 2006

For about 10 minutes last night all I could see was "You Killed Svevan".

ThePermMarch 22, 2006

i cant wait till my mom delivers it face-icon-small-smile.gif

SvevanEvan Burchfield, Staff AlumnusMarch 23, 2006

Quote

For about 10 minutes last night all I could see was "You Killed Svevan".


Two day headstarts apparently mean NOTHING to you.

KDR_11kMarch 23, 2006

Can you do rocket jumps?

BloodworthDaniel Bloodworth, Staff AlumnusMarch 23, 2006

Quote

Originally posted by: EvanTBurchfield
Quote

For about 10 minutes last night all I could see was "You Killed Svevan".


Two day headstarts apparently mean NOTHING to you.


Oh so now you don't just whine about my "headstart," you stretch it out too. I got the game Monday morning. You got it Tuesday. Where are these two days? :-)

IceColdMarch 23, 2006

Quote

And I was like "BOOM!!!! HEADSHOT!!!!"
LOL do you watch Pure Pwnage? I think some of the episodes were filmed here..

SvevanEvan Burchfield, Staff AlumnusMarch 23, 2006

Quote

Originally posted by: Bloodworth
Quote

Originally posted by: EvanTBurchfield
Quote

For about 10 minutes last night all I could see was "You Killed Svevan".


Two day headstarts apparently mean NOTHING to you.


Oh so now you don't just whine about my "headstart," you stretch it out too. I got the game Monday morning. You got it Tuesday. Where are these two days? :-)


YOU PLAYED THE GAME FOR A DAY UP AT NINTENDO'S HEADQUARTERS YOU HALF SPOON OF MEANNESS.

Karl Castaneda #2Karl Castaneda, Staff AlumnusMarch 23, 2006

I think Evan's just got mad envy.

Yeah, I said it. Mad envy.

Smash_BrotherMarch 23, 2006

I was right about there being a rock-paper-scissors scenario in this game.

From Nintendo's official strategy guide (stolen from Gamefaqs):

Samus
Ideal Teammate: Kanden
Most Vulnerable Prey: Sylux

Kanden
Ideal Teammates: Samus, Sylux
Most Vulnerable Prey: Weavel, Trace

Spire
Ideal Teammate: Noxus
Most Vulnerable Prey: Samus, Noxus

Weavel
Ideal Teammate: Noxus
Most Vulnerable Prey: Trace, Spire

Noxus
Ideal Teammates: Spire, Weavel
Most Vulnerable Prey: Samus, Kanden

Trace
Ideal Teammates: Spire, Samus
Most Vulnerable Prey: Weavel, Sylux

Sylux
Ideal Teammate: Kanden
Most Vulnerable Prey: Weavel

I think Kanden works very well against Sylux, however, as you can use the alt form to simply get in Sylux's face to avoid the lightning gun.

Overall, though, Sylux is probably the best character I've seen because, as soon as a Sylux player is below 125 health, they can alt form it and run like hell, having one of the fastest alt forms in the game, and go find health before returning to fight again. I've actually raced players to health powerups and beat them with Sylux because the alt form is just so damn fast.

Also, Sylux WTFPWNs Weavel. When Weavel drops the turret, Sylux's lightning drains health from the turret AND the player, and since the turret is stationary, Sylux can easily recover health off it and survive (as the longer you aim the lighting and are hitting the target, the faster it drains).

I still don't see a strategy to counter a chicken-Sylux player. MAYBE if Samus is faster in morph ball (she should be with the boost) and trying to drop mines in front of him, but that's a goddamn stretch.

Anyone have a strategy which beats a cautions Sylux player who knows to run early?

Quote

Originally posted by: IceCold
Quote

And I was like "BOOM!!!! HEADSHOT!!!!"
LOL do you watch Pure Pwnage? I think some of the episodes were filmed here..


I've seen the video of that, with the CS junkie chatting with the C&C junkie. That's where I pulled it from.

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Metroid Prime: Hunters Box Art

Genre Shooter
Developer Nintendo Software Technology
Players1 - 4
Online1 - 4
Controllers

Worldwide Releases

na: Metroid Prime: Hunters
Release Mar 20, 2006
PublisherNintendo
RatingTeen
jpn: Metroid Prime Hunters
Release Jun 01, 2006
PublisherNintendo
RatingAll Ages
eu: Metroid Prime: Hunters
Release May 05, 2006
PublisherNintendo
Rating12+
aus: Metroid Prime: Hunters
Release May 2006
PublisherNintendo
RatingMature

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