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Switch

Nintendo Labo Announced

by Justin Berube - January 17, 2018, 2:43 pm PST
Total comments: 55

Weird and exciting new ways to enjoy Nintendo Switch.

Nintendo has just announced Nintendo Labo, a new series of software, and cardboard accessories, coming to Nintendo Switch. Nintendo Labo kits combine do-it-yourself modular cardboard projects with special Nintendo Switch software to create items, or Toy-Con, that can be used or played with when combined with Nintendo Switch Hardware. Two kits are currently planned.

The first kit, the Variety Kit, can be used to create five different Toy-Con projects. Projects include two RC Cars, a Fishing Rod, a House, a Motorbike, and a Piano. The Variety Kit will retail for $69.99 and includes Nintendo Labo Kit Software for the Nintendo Switch.

The second kit, the Robot Kit, comes with everything needed to make a Toy-Con robot suit and the software to interact with it for Nintendo Switch. The Robot Kit will retail for $79.99.

And finally, a Customization Set that includes stickers, stencils, and special tape will be sold along side both sets for $9.99 assuring users that they can create unique looking Toy-Con that stand out and fit the users personality.

The Nintendo Labo projects which include the Variety Kit, the Robot Kit, and the Customization Set all launch on April 20th.

Talkback

ShyGuyJanuary 17, 2018

I love how crazy Nintendo is

MagicCow64January 17, 2018

So this is what Michel Gondry has been up to

TOPHATANT123January 17, 2018

Super creative and something that's only possible on the switch. It's a novelty item to be sure and I don't expect the cardboard to last very long, but to be fair it's only a cute April side project, it's not like they're betting the farm on it.

SteefosaurusJanuary 17, 2018

Launches 4/20 too. Perfect marketing video.
Also, is this Project Giant Robot's time to shine?

AdrockJanuary 17, 2018

This is actually pretty neat. I mean, I don’t give a shit about it personally, but I can admit that it’s a completely harmless and creative idea.

SorenJanuary 17, 2018

1st Impression -WTF that actually looks neat
2nd Impression - -checks price- Hmmm...a tad pricey
3rd Impression - Wait, will this thing have more than an afternoon's worth of enjoyable content?


It's cool but I don't think it's for me.

MASBJanuary 17, 2018

Hmmm. Looks neat and has possibilities. I assume the bulk of the cost is due to the cartridge. But I have doubts about how durable the cardboard is. If that is messed up, do you have to buy another whole kit? Hopefully, there will be cheaper replacements.

SorenJanuary 17, 2018

Quote from: MASB

Hmmm. Looks neat and has possibilities. I assume the bulk of the cost is due to the cartridge. But I have doubts about how durable the cardboard is. If that is messed up, do you have to buy another whole kit? Hopefully, there will be cheaper replacements.

This. I have no faith in that robot kit lasting more than a few uses.

Fatty The HuttJanuary 17, 2018

I think the idea is not only kits but free form creations too. Maybe I am wrong.
Anyway I think this has the potential to be huge. I think the kits are too expensive already but I thought that about the Switch and was wrong about it hurting sales. Also, Lego is freakin expensive but sells wonderfully anyway.

I both love this and will never buy this.


Here's the thing, guys.  There is durable cardboard that can take a decent bit of ding/beating until it actually starts breaking.  I'm not so concerned about the durability of cardboard as much as the destructive force of my children.  I don't care what you tell a 5+ year old....if they get excited, they're gonna start flailing their arms wildly in their movements and pull these things beyond their limits.



DonkeyBilly KongJanuary 17, 2018

The keyboard seems to use the depth camera to track how far the key being hit is from the controller, which determines the note.  When I first saw the camera, a theramin is what came to mind.  You could just build a little cardboard stand to hold the camera facing up for that.

nickmitchJanuary 17, 2018

This is another "clear the schedule" type thing for me because it sounds like a perfect afternoon activity that I might never pick up again.



Also, the era of plastic crap is officially over.

ejamerJanuary 17, 2018

I agree with lolmonade's comment about kids getting excited and damaging the cardboard...


...but as a huge fan of Pinbox 3000 (a ready-to-assemble DIY pinball table made out of cardboard) this really intrigues me. Seems like an awesome way to encourage kids who might want to spend too much time in front of the TV to actually get creative and build something. I doubt there will be much flexibility outside of the specific apps that Nintendo makes, but still a very cool gesture.


(All of that said, I don't have a Switch so obviously won't be buying.)

MASBJanuary 17, 2018

http://nintendoeverything.com/nintendo-labo-kits-apparently-not-mandatory-cardboards-pattern-will-be-offered-for-free-cartridge-still-needed/

That makes more sense. So the games can/will be sold separately. I wonder if they'll charge $60 for them. :p Hopefully not.

Evan_BJanuary 17, 2018

I think people are undervaluing the idea that these kits are cardboard- it may not be durable, but its also easily replaceable. I don't think Nintendo would bank their strategy on a concept like this if they didn't also understand that the material is fragile.

However, my concern, as a market strategist, is this: you make kits that are relatively cost-effective to produce and allow for a number of different possibilities, but how many of these products are going to be released a year? The DIY concept is great, but we have more durable alternatives and judging by the nature of the software, you'll have significant time gaps between new models as ideas are being generated.  If that's the case, why not go for something a bit more durable?

On one hand, I love the idea, but as stated previously in the thread, the games need to have sufficient content to them in order to justify their price point. If they offer digital versions of the Labo software on the eShop and the price is drastically different from the in-store product, they're essentially admitting that the convenience factor of getting the "peripheral bundle" is a huge factor in this scheme and that these games don't really have a great amount of content.

But on the other hand, a cute little Nintendo Switch piano would be a lovely desk toy.

azekeJanuary 17, 2018

This is brilliant.

My thoughts in picture form:

http://abload.de/img/nintendolabotcs4g.png

AdrockJanuary 17, 2018

Quote from: azeke

This is brilliant.

My thoughts in picture form:

http://abload.de/img/nintendolabotcs4g.png

I love that Spongebob and Patrick are clearly having more fun than Squidward.

Ultimately, it’d be wild if that’s how this played out. Sony races against Oculus and others to make VR happen then Nintendo releases cardboard cutouts and everyone thinks that’s the next big thing in gaming.

LemonadeJanuary 17, 2018

Well, they were right when they said it was for kids. I dont have any interest in buying it, but I will try it out when my sister buys it for her kids.

I like that it is new and innovative, and yet feels like something that only Nintendo could ever come up with.

broodwarsJanuary 17, 2018

Labo might be one of the most stupid things I've ever seen. At this point, I feel like it only exists to ensure there's a lot of stressed-out parents buying replacements Switches & joycons when their children break them shoving them in this cardboard crap on the floor.

I played with cardboard stuff like this when "I" was a kid. Because we were dirt poor & couldn't afford expensive electronic gadgets in the 80s, so we made do with the random crap lying around & our creativity. If you're well-off enough to own a Switch (among many other electronic devices), I don't see why any kid would have the slightest interest in Labo.

ThePermJanuary 18, 2018

Quote from: broodwars

Labo might be one of the most stupid things I've ever seen. At this point, I feel like it only exists to ensure there's a lot of stressed-out parents buying replacements Switches & joycons when their children break them shoving them in this cardboard crap on the floor.

I played with cardboard stuff like this when "I" was a kid. Because we were dirt poor & couldn't afford expensive electronic gadgets in the 80s, so we made do with the random crap lying around & our creativity. If you're well-off enough to own a Switch (among many other electronic devices), I don't see why any kid would have the slightest interest in Labo.

Maybe they want to make vibration robots? OR just Vibrators.

SteefosaurusJanuary 18, 2018

Quote from: broodwars

I played with cardboard stuff like this when "I" was a kid. Because we were dirt poor & couldn't afford expensive electronic gadgets in the 80s, so we made do with the random crap lying around & our creativity. If you're well-off enough to own a Switch (among many other electronic devices), I don't see why any kid would have the slightest interest in Labo.

Could be entirely off-base here, but maybe that's kind of exactly the appeal for richer families? Kids need to have their imagination stimulated, but for a generation who grows up with iPads and Switches, a lot of their playtime will likely be in largely pre-determined video game worlds.
Nintendo Labo itself may ultimately prove rather limited, because there's only so many cardboard things to fold and make applicable games for... But for those kids it may trigger an "a-ha I can also make up my own stuff, just with these cardboard boxes we have laying about!" moment.

Likewise I think well-off parents who have given their kids "virtual babysitters" (tablets/3DS/Switch) probably wished their kid spent more time outside playing make-believe with friends, in stead of Minecraft on the couch.

It's 100% a 1st-world-problem! But I can totally see it resonating with these people for precisely that reason; it's a way to get kids actually playing, but won't seem boring compared to their tech gadgets.

Evan_BJanuary 18, 2018

I think it’s much more well-suited for a Japanese audience, who would treat these sorts of creations with a bit more care. But I think the nature of building things is a universal childhood joy, and the more technical side of these is rather inspiring.

But I mean, I’m arguing with a brick wall here.

ejamerJanuary 18, 2018

Quote from: broodwars

Labo might be one of the most stupid things I've ever seen. At this point, I feel like it only exists to ensure there's a lot of stressed-out parents buying replacements Switches & joycons when their children break them shoving them in this cardboard crap on the floor.

I played with cardboard stuff like this when "I" was a kid. Because we were dirt poor & couldn't afford expensive electronic gadgets in the 80s, so we made do with the random crap lying around & our creativity. If you're well-off enough to own a Switch (among many other electronic devices), I don't see why any kid would have the slightest interest in Labo.

Do you have kids? Are they also soulless?
;)
The "maker" movement won't appeal to everyone - but it will appeal greatly to some. And almost all kids I've met enjoy building things that actually work and take great pride in that experience.


Your complaint is like someone asking why anyone would buy Lego instead of a Tonka truck. The two things are different, and useful for different goals. Both can be a lot of fun though.


That said, I have two concerns:
* how big is the market really going to be? probably not huge, although I likely said the same thing after seeing a Raspberry Pi for the first time
* how versatile will the software actually be? this is the bigger limiting factor in my mind - the cardboard bits will probably be a neat gimmick but it's the underlying software that will determine how much life this concept really has


(Then again, I really do love my cardboard pinball tables - and they have only and exactly one function... so it's not like the software needs to be infinitely expandable as long as it does something neat enough to come back to.)

SorenJanuary 18, 2018

Quote from: broodwars

If you're well-off enough to own a Switch (among many other electronic devices), I don't see why any kid would have the slightest interest in Labo.

I used to work at a nonprofit that focused on getting kids to play outside through pop-up playgrounds and other creative outlets. One major point was that we used plenty of recycled material including -gasp- cardboard. Kids (of both well-off and low income families) unleashed their creativity in incredible ways.


Sometimes it's ok to admit when you have no idea what you're talking about.

nickmitchJanuary 18, 2018

I don't see why kids wouldn't be interested in this.  I went to the Apple store the other day, and they were teaching a class of kids how to program robots or something.  Seems like there's a education component of this at play here too, which should appeal to adults with kids.

Also, shoving the Switch into some cardboard doesn't seem like it would break the the thing.  And the system seems sturdy enough to survive some modest rough housing, even though very little of what was shown looks like you'll have to move the console around too much.

DonkeyBilly KongJanuary 18, 2018

I agree with ejamer that the success depends on the software.  What we've seen in the promo is premade projects that don't allow for much creativity, although they may be great projects for younger kids.  However, if the software allows basic logic with if->then, do->while, etc. in some graphical form, then it could be HUGE.  Raspberry Pi is going to be more flexible regardless, but it is also more intimidating than a simple game kit like this.

broodwarsJanuary 18, 2018

Quote from: Soren

Quote from: broodwars

If you're well-off enough to own a Switch (among many other electronic devices), I don't see why any kid would have the slightest interest in Labo.

I used to work at a nonprofit that focused on getting kids to play outside through pop-up playgrounds and other creative outlets. One major point was that we used plenty of recycled material including -gasp- cardboard. Kids (of both well-off and low income families) unleashed their creativity in incredible ways.


Sometimes it's ok to admit when you have no idea what you're talking about.

Today's kids play Minecraft as I once played with LEGOs & Lincoln Logs, and the appeal is obvious: endless creative possibilities. Labo is too limited, too expensive, & requires an expensive (& fragile) gaming console. Labo itself is also much more fragile than any of its traditional contemporaries.

For this to have mass appeal, it would need to be considerably cheaper & incorporate a mobile app as well as a Switch one.

BlackNMild2k1January 18, 2018

After watching the video and seeing how all this works mechanically, I am AMAZED at this.

as I said in the other thread, this would be such an amazing "parent-child" project, but I would be more enthusiastic if my daughter was a little bit older and able to really get into it. It looks a little pricey, but the concept is inspiring. I don't know how it will play out in the end, but for now, I love the idea. Maybe I'll pick one up for future use in a few years.

This is hopefully inspiring the future (Mechanical and computer) engineers of the future. Because it sure got the attention of the young hopeful creative engineer in me from who knows how many years ago.


edit:
At the very least, I can see all the memes being incredibly entertaining :)
https://www.polygon.com/2018/1/17/16903268/nintendo-labo-twitter-jokes

SteefosaurusJanuary 18, 2018

Quote from: broodwars

Labo is too limited, too expensive, & requires an expensive (& fragile) gaming console. Labo itself is also much more fragile than any of its traditional contemporaries.

For this to have mass appeal, it would need to be considerably cheaper & incorporate a mobile app as well as a Switch one.

Partially agree yeah, and if this takes off you can guarantee that companies will be rushing phone apps with their own (possibly downloadable, open-source?) cardboard blueprints before the holidays. Honestly I think people will already be having meetings like that this month (could be a great fit for Ikea honestly).

I agree it's possibly rather limited, and certainly on the pricey end. In that regard I think this might've done better as a holiday release, or during Summer when kids have spare time.
That said, I'm inclined to baselessly predict Labo to be a runaway success. It won't reach Wii Sports/Amiibo/Pokémon GO levels, but if a couple of videos go viral with titles like "my cute toddler plays Moonlight Sonata on Labo piano" I feel like this could be big, albeit short-lived, hit. Cheaper variations will follow soon; Nintendo is rarely the cheapest option unfortunately.

nickmitchJanuary 18, 2018

I assume GameStop will make their own cardboard set based on the actual and sell it.

AdrockJanuary 18, 2018

Quote from: nickmitch

I assume GameStop will make their own cardboard set based on the actual and sell it.

Will GameStop’s sets still harass customers about pre-orders? 🤔

ejamerJanuary 18, 2018

To people saying it needs to be cheaper, I "had" to buy 2 sets of Twin Hatchimals this holiday season.
They cost far too much, and after the initial hype have become glorified paperweights (as predicted and expected). Nintendo Labo looks way cooler, and I suspect it would have a much better shelf-life.

Not everyone will spend upwards of $80 for a novelty... but enough people will that it could be economically viable if your product can build some hype. Nintendo is hot right now. The Switch is incredibly hot and outselling any other video game platform by a country mile. If this takes hold in social media, then it could be a smash hit; if it doesn't, then it will sell to a niche audience for a short time and then disappear once the cardboard remnants are sold at huge markdown. In either case, it won't be worse than Wii Music.

Will there be iOS clones in short order? Possibly - although the separate sensors and screen you get with Switch are probably better suited to this type of application.  Nintendo providing pre-cut cardboard templates also makes it much more appealing for parents. Competitors can undercut them on price for software alone, but few will have the production/distribution chains to make it convenient... simply showing the plans and asking people to source and cut cardboard themselves is a lot more effort. There's a reason it's being sold as a kit by Nintendo.



Frankly, I don't think it will be a hit. This is a niche product. But most of the complaints I see posted seem unimaginative and ill-informed:
* Don't try to sell me on the "kids won't want to play with this" excuse - I have two kids, and works with kids often.
* *Don't try to sell me on the "cardboard isn't sturdy enough" excuse - I have cardboard projects already that are well made and sturdy enough to hold up to adult and kid play (as long as you don't mind changing some rubber bands once in a while).
* Don't try to sell me on the "it's too expensive to be successful" excuse - I know how much money people (especially parents) waste on novelty items of all sorts. The hype and marketing is much more important than the cost. How it's perceived on social media will likely determine how far this product goes.

Ian SaneJanuary 18, 2018

There's a lot of talk here about creativity but how would that work?  I'm assuming that each of those examples Nintendo showed off required the software to specifically accomodate it.  How would someone make their own thing out of cardboard and have the Switch actually do what it is supposed to with it?  And if the Switch doesn't interact with it properly then why don't you just play make-believe with cardboard without the Switch?  So far it just looks like you can play fishing rod or robot or whatever because Nintendo made a Switch game for it.

If Labo had been the whole Switch concept I would have lost my mind but unless Nintendo recklessly overproduces the thing it won't matter if this succeeds or not.  It's a product I think kids will like that I fear is overpriced.  But it's not aimed at me and that's okay because the Switch overall IS aimed at me.  It's also aimed at kids and frankly is a flexible game system that anyone can enjoy.  There's some alternate universe where the Nintendo of the Wii era is designing a whole system entirely around this cardboard stuff but thankfully we're not in it.  I've got all these awesome games available to me and the segment of Nintendo management that's obsessed with novelties like this can't bugger that up.  This is how you're supposed to implement ideas like these - as optional accessories for a system that is flexible enough in its design that it works well as just a typical game console.

Though when I look at this it makes me wonder why Nintendo doesn't make toys as a seperate entity from their videogames business.  Clearly with this and some of their motion control implementations there is some strong interest to make products that are more like toys than games, which fits their history.  Well why shoehorn that into videogames?  Why not have a dedicated toys division which while it can create products that leverage Nintendo's game systems, can also create toys unrelated to it?

DonkeyBilly KongJanuary 18, 2018

Ian, there are many kid-friendly educational products (and even some for programmers) with easy to grasp visual interfaces for programming.  There would be sensor boxes with parameters (tilt angles, joysticks, distance from the depth camera, touch screen tap, etc.) and output boxes (generating sounds, vibrating, colors on screen, etc).  These interfaces typically work by dragging and dropping the boxes and sticking arrows between them, which is intuitive enough for most people to quickly understand.  If they include an interface like this for custom builds, and hopefully allow for sharing them online, then people could create their own cardboard devices and share the templates online.  That is the real appeal of a product like this.  The sets shown hopefully just act as an introduction to the concepts.

AdrockJanuary 18, 2018

Quote from: Ian

Well why shoehorn that into videogames?  Why not have a dedicated toys division which while it can create products that leverage Nintendo's game systems, can also create toys unrelated to it?

Because Nintendo doesn’t want to. It can license out its IPs for t-shirts, toys, and whatnot, but everything it’s directly involved in creating is related to video games. You call it shoehorning when it’s often the entire point. Wii never would have caught on as a side product. Maybe that’s your point. It’s well established that you hate motion controls. Trying to separate this experimental part of Nintendo is a complete lack of understanding of what is at the core of Nintendo as a company.

The comparison is silly. To me, Nintendo wanted people to buy Wii because of motion controls while Labo seems to be something people may be interested in because they already have a Switch. For that reason, Labo is perfectly positioned. It isn’t strong enough of a concept for wide spread appeal. I can walk right by it at stores and never think twice. It doesn’t even have the allure of being a fun decoration like Amiibo. Still, I love that people generally seem so excited about this.

ejamerJanuary 18, 2018

Honestly, I'm not expecting the kind of drag-and-drop interface that DonkeyBilly Kong describes - although it would be awesome! And yet Nintendo did release the incredible WarioWare DIY game on DS and a WiiWare counterpart so you could share created mini-games with friends... so maybe it'll happen.


When I talk about creativity, it's more about showing kids what is possible. I'd bet that lots of kids will create their own cardboard contraptions (sans electronics) after playing with this set, using their imaginations to make up for the lack of actual features.  I'd bet that a few get interested enough they pick up an Arduino or Raspberry Pi and a few sensors to see what they can do. Others will just move and not care - although hopefully the experience of building these little devices will be an neat way to get them thinking about some basic engineering.

Seriously - what kid doesn't love seeing how things work? We had books and TV shows about it, why not a video game?  (Whether it holds their attention span for more than an afternoon remains to be seen - frankly, I have my doubt. But at least it's a good afternoon.)



Adrock nails why this isn't a good stand-alone toy. You can already get a few really cool cardboard toys and gadgets to build - but the electronics (and sensors and screens) that are taken for granted with a Switch are what will make this really come alive for some kids. The cost of doing those separately would be prohibitive. Additionally, by selling to the already large and rapidly growing Switch install base, Nintendo will get visibility for the product it could never achieve otherwise. As a stand-alone product it would be a cool novelty that probably doesn't get much attention; as a weird Switch accessory it will at least get enough exposure that it has a chance to take off in social channels.

DonkeyBilly KongJanuary 18, 2018

I'm not really expecting that interface either, since it wasn't shown, but I do think it is a requirement for the product to explode in popularity.  If the software is just for these specific cardboard creations, I don't see it gaining much traction, unless they put out a steady flow of new add-on packs.  It would be more specifically a small kid thing, though, like those LeapFrog activity books and cartridges.  It is odd that the promo featured an adult if it falls into that category.

Nevermind, it's gonna be huge:

http://i0.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/original/001/333/620/b51.png

nickmitchJanuary 18, 2018

Can't wait to see how Sakurai works Labo in the next Smash Bros.

ReggieFA!January 18, 2018

The cardboard house looks great, I wish I had one for my DS or Wii controllers back in the day. They could make some stands/shadowboxes for amiibo collections. It's pure profit, gets kids outside and working together on projects, and gives their dev teams a breather before Smash/Metroid (endless literal lootcrates to fill in release gaps). Miyamoto is a great man, and we are all just playing on his playground.

Ian SaneJanuary 18, 2018

Quote from: Adrock

Quote from: Ian

Well why shoehorn that into videogames?  Why not have a dedicated toys division which while it can create products that leverage Nintendo's game systems, can also create toys unrelated to it?

Because Nintendo doesn’t want to. It can license out its IPs for t-shirts, toys, and whatnot, but everything it’s directly involved in creating is related to video games. You call it shoehorning when it’s often the entire point. Wii never would have caught on as a side product. Maybe that’s your point. It’s well established that you hate motion controls. Trying to separate this experimental part of Nintendo is a complete lack of understanding of what is at the core of Nintendo as a company.

The comparison is silly. To me, Nintendo wanted people to buy Wii because of motion controls while Labo seems to be something people may be interested in because they already have a Switch. For that reason, Labo is perfectly positioned. It isn’t strong enough of a concept for wide spread appeal. I can walk right by it at stores and never think twice. It doesn’t even have the allure of being a fun decoration like Amiibo. Still, I love that people generally seem so excited about this.

I'm thinking of it more as a business opportunity.  Stuff like this and 1-2-Switch are getting very far removed from videogames.  So they obviously have people working there that don't really want to make videogames, but rather toys (or they want to make both).  Those people probably also have ideas that won't work within the confines of a videogame system.  So maybe Nintendo could also make toys, like they did in the past.  I don't mean generic stuff another company can do like t-shirts and action figures but weird creative stuff that only Nintendo could do.  If they want to make toys why restrict themselves to ideas that require implementation with a videogame system?  Why not expand their product line so they can release standalone products as well?  They would have to start small obviously but I think it's something they would be naturally good at.

nickmitchJanuary 18, 2018

I think working with the video game system is starting small.  It builds of their existing line of products and provides an "in" for someone who would be drawn more to one aspect than the other.  That is, someone more drawn to the toy aspect could be compelled to buy a Switch, or a Switch owner could start thinking of Nintendo as more than a video game company.  Labo could even be it's own line of products, which down the road could detach itself from needing the Switch.

UncleBobRichard Cook, Guest ContributorJanuary 18, 2018

When did video games stop being toys?

nickmitchJanuary 18, 2018

When eSports happened?

Ian SaneJanuary 18, 2018

Quote from: UncleBob

When did video games stop being toys?

When they started marketing them to adults.  Mortal Kombat's fault, I guess. :)

Luigi DudeJanuary 18, 2018

Quote from: DonkeyBilly

Nevermind, it's gonna be huge:

http://i0.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/original/001/333/620/b51.png

I just pre-ordered 10 copies.

azekeJanuary 18, 2018

Quote from: Soren

Sometimes it's ok to admit when you have no idea what you're talking about.

But how else will you fish for replies and attention?

BlackNMild2k1January 18, 2018

Quote from: DonkeyBilly

Nevermind, it's gonna be huge:

http://i0.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/original/001/333/620/b51.png

Oh Lord.... the memes... becoming reality...

I hope it gets popular now. just because it's too funny.

UncleBobRichard Cook, Guest ContributorJanuary 18, 2018

Quote from: Ian

Quote from: UncleBob

When did video games stop being toys?

When they started marketing them to adults.  Mortal Kombat's fault, I guess. :)

When did toys become off-limits for adults?

ThePermJanuary 19, 2018

Quote from: UncleBob

Quote from: Ian

Quote from: UncleBob

When did video games stop being toys?

When they started marketing them to adults.  Mortal Kombat's fault, I guess. :)

When did toys become off-limits for adults?

jokes on you

http://www.yojoe.com/archive/actfig/mk/2scorpion.jpg
http://youbentmywookie.com/wookie/gallery/1211_new-loose-images-of-jazwares-mortal-kombat-classic-mk2-style-ninja-4-pack/jazwares-mortal-kombat-1.JPG

Mop it upJanuary 19, 2018

I have no interest in this, but I could see it being a hit.

AdrockJanuary 19, 2018

Quote from: Mop

I have no interest in this, but I could see it being a hit.

That's pretty much where I stand. Labo isn't offensive to me. Nintendo probably has a really small team playing with cardboard all day. This is something Sony and Microsoft aren't and can't do with their respective hardware so whatever, I have no problem with Nintendo throwing it against the wall and seeing what sticks.

pokepal148January 19, 2018

Quote from: Adrock

Quote from: Mop

I have no interest in this, but I could see it being a hit.

That's pretty much where I stand. Labo isn't offensive to me. Nintendo probably has a really small team playing with cardboard all day. This is something Sony and Microsoft aren't and can't do with their respective hardware so whatever, I have no problem with Nintendo throwing it against the wall and seeing what sticks.

Yeah but all that work could be going towards Mother 3 finally coming to the US.

BlackNMild2k1January 19, 2018

Quote from: pokepal148

Quote from: Adrock

Quote from: Mop

I have no interest in this, but I could see it being a hit.

That's pretty much where I stand. Labo isn't offensive to me. Nintendo probably has a really small team playing with cardboard all day. This is something Sony and Microsoft aren't and can't do with their respective hardware so whatever, I have no problem with Nintendo throwing it against the wall and seeing what sticks.

Yeah but all that work could be going towards Mother 3 finally coming to the US.

Keep holding that torch... Mother3 will come the the US one day

KhushrenadaJanuary 20, 2018

Quote from: broodwars

one of the most stupid things I've ever ... played with ... was ... expensive electronic gadgets in the 80s, so we made do with the random crap lying around ... I ... see why any kid would have ... interest in Labo.

Quote from: broodwars

I once played with LEGOs & Lincoln Logs, and ... Labo is ... much more ... to have mass appeal

Whoa! Ok there, Mr. Positive. Maybe pump the brakes there. Yeah, it's neat but there are still potential hurdles for Labo to overcome first.

Got to hand it to Nintendo's Marketing but they've been doing really good with the Switch in perfectly getting the message across of what games and the system are like and can do. Likewise with Labo, watching the promo for it got me interested and excited for it even though I'm really not interested in acquiring more unitasker gaming peripherals for my closet. But I do like this concept of next level origami. Not quite completely sold but definitely very interested.

ThePermJanuary 22, 2018

I predict this will do slightly better than Brain Age!

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