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DS

Nintendo Wi-Fi Menu Details Exposed

by Michael Cole - October 14, 2005, 10:33 pm PDT
Total comments: 57 Source: PGC Reader Scott Rubin

PGC Reader Scott Rubin reports from DigitalLife with much-desired details on the Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection menu. WEP support explicitly confirmed.

PGC Reader Scott Rubin attended the DigitalLife exposition on Friday and was clever enough to look into the Nintendo Wi-Fi menu system. Both Animal Crossing: Wild World and Mario Kart DS include this standardized menu, which includes most of the features over which fans have expressed concern.

Pictures speak louder than words—even if they are pictures of text—so Mr. Rubin has graciously created a slideshow of his photos of the menu system. If you can’t view the slideshow or cannot be bothered to click a hyperlink, here is a rundown of the options and settings:

  • Easily transfer your settings to another DS (using normal DS wireless connections)

  • Space for three connections—no need to change router settings every time you use a different network.

  • A separate one-touch connection for the Nintendo Wi-Fi USB Connector

  • For each connection

      Easily search for a wireless network

      One-touch AOSS support for Buffalo routers and access points.

      Manual Setup

  • Under Manual Setup

      Auto-obtain DNS or explicitly define Primary & secondary DNS servers, Gateway, Subnet mask, etc.

      SSID and WEP Key (WPA does indeed seem to be unsupported)

      DHCP or manual IP assignment

With the exception of WPA—which is a new enough standard to still be spottily supported among deployed wireless networks anyway—this is a comprehensive list of settings. Some gamers may need to downgrade from WPA to WEP, but everyone should be able to get their current hardware to work with Nintendo DS.

Talkback

ArtimusOctober 14, 2005

Stuff like this is why I love PGC! Awesome!

As for storage, I'd agree that either the system stores it (which BY FAR makes the most sense...please Nintendo). Now you might need a game in there to edit the settings, but hopefully they tansfer from game to game. There's transfer to another DS so it'd be silly not to have game to game...

Great news for WEP for sure. That'll put minds at rest.

RABicleOctober 14, 2005

Quote

Easily transfer your settings to another DS (using normal DS wireless connections)
This could be really handy as noobs can have some nerd like do their settings and simply copy it across.

But I don't think this should be a menu in the games, rather online games should update the DS firmware with this menu accessible from your regular DS menu.

Well, Artimus, it really comes down to whether Nintendo considered (or had even begun planning) Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection when the system specs and BIOS were designed. If they didn't have the foresight include extra DS persistent memory for such future features, they may be stuck without the most sensible option.

EDIT: (RABicle posted before me) I think it is also a must when visiting a friend's house. Surely you can copy over one connection's setting without wiping out your own...

bananaboyOctober 15, 2005

I just wonder if people like me who use MAC addressing will have a simple way to check the MAC address of the DS as that would be very handy. Otherwise I can just do as I did with my PS2 (de-activate MAC filtering, check the DHCP list, add the PS2's MAC address, turn on MAC filtering).

From what we all know its in every game so that kind of sucks, but since its easy enough its not a big deal. Hopefully a firmware update will come with the ability to store the data (as well as an online version of Pictochat please!)

kirby_killer_dededeOctober 15, 2005

No one knows how disappointed I'll be if I don't see some online Picto-Chat soon.

PaleMike Gamin, Contributing EditorOctober 15, 2005

There is a not so simple way to check the MAC address of things when it isn't apparent. If you turn the MAC address filtering off on your router, then connect the ds to it, then the router will display the MAC address...

Pass friends list between games??? Is this true? I thought Nintendo said otherwise?

steveyOctober 15, 2005

From those shot it look like it's buit in to the ds.

WFT my space bar died and n,b,/,down key,and Ctrl die, sorry if post is hard to read.

RennyOctober 15, 2005

I already bitched in the other thread, but the issue bears mentioning in this 'official' thread. WEP is completely insufficient for wireless security. Anyone with the slightest inclination to get on your network can easily obtain your WEP key. People won't be "downgrading," they'll be compromising all their security. What are the options for connecting your DS to your home network?

1) Disable WPA altogether in favor of WEP, thereby leaving your network completely vulnerable.
2) Switch your network from WPA to WEP when you want to connect your DS, leaving you to reconfigure any clients that were previously connected.
3) Use a WiFi card in your PC as a bridge to your network. You will either need proper software that allows your card to run as an access point in infrastructure mode (not common, poor hardware support, though you're in better shape if you use Linux); or you can use XP's connection bridge, which will require the DS to connect in ad-hoc mode. I'm not sure if the DS has this ability for a TCP/IP connection or not, but I suspect it doesn't. Anyone?

I have a feeling the DS is incapable of WPA altogether, and we'll still be forced to use WEP in 5 years when it would be absurd to run any secured network with such lax security. But if the DS is capable of other authentication protocols, will these make their way through the SDK? Lacking WPA now tells me that Nintendo is taking the same approach as WiFi vendors: make setup as stupidly easy as possible and security be damned, all that matters is penetration. They want that 90% whatever the cost.

KDR_11kOctober 15, 2005

I think the DS might be too weak to do WPA.

ssj4_androidOctober 15, 2005

No WPA? Screw you, Nintendo. Will you be liable when someone hacks into my network and gets all my information? Will you do that for everyone?

ArtimusOctober 15, 2005

If you're really worried about WPA, then get one of the USB keys which solves everything.

Interesting thought, what if it IS built into the system but you have to have a Wi-Fi game to access it? Meaning it's saved for all games but we didn't know it's there?

PaleMike Gamin, Contributing EditorOctober 15, 2005

Someone stole the precious documents!!@!

Video games did it! Someone call Jacko!

NotSoStuOctober 15, 2005

Interesting. It looks sort of like the DS's main menu (especially the background), but with nicer looking buttons. I'd betcha that we'll see a BIOS flash or something included with any new online games. Which means there's hope for an online Pictochat. Which means there's hope for anti-aliased lines! Whoamg!

I think we all need to keep in mind the Nintendo DS has a limited amount of space on its BIOS chip. I don't think the sky is the limit with BIOS upgrades, especially if Nintendo cheaped out on us. Are there any hackers in the audience who know a thing or two about DS BIOS flashing and the related files/chips?

Quote

Pass friends list between games??? Is this true? I thought Nintendo said otherwise?
Nintendo left this unclear (the company doesn't seem to like giving details about this stuff ahead of time). However, a source I'm not sure I can disclose--laregly because I didn't talk directly with them--has stated that the buddy list is shared among games.

JonLeungOctober 15, 2005

When I'm at GameFAQs, I feel like there are a lot of dumb people.
When I'm here, I feel like one of those dumb people. o_0 Especially when I see topics like this.

Sounds like you people know every technical detail. Which is good. But for me, and especially people less bright than myself, will simply getting online and playing games with other people be a breeze?

ArtimusOctober 15, 2005

So...umm...Jeux France has a video up. It's in Spanish but still:

http://www.jeux-france.com/downloads4665_win4_video-mario-kart-ds.html

Nothing new, but looking at it I think the fact that there's a system info place that it'll be system wide.

RABicleOctober 15, 2005

Quote

Originally posted by: JonLeung
Sounds like you people know every technical detail. Which is good. But for me, and especially people less bright than myself, will simply getting online and playing games with other people be a breeze?

Don't feel dumb. Anyone with a wireless network knows what they're talking about and will understand how to make their DS connect to it. So if you're feeling left out I'm guessing you don't have an existing wireless network. For people like you Nintendo have provided the USB wifi dongle and the DS has a preset to connect to that. It should be easy.

bustin98October 15, 2005

I wouldn't assume 'anyone' with an existing wireless network knows about security. In my area (and many others) Road Runner has been installing wireless routers in homes by technicians who don't give a damn. And consumers don't know enough to ask. Its a shame, but a fact of life.

Everyone should remember that the only dumb question is the one that goes un-asked.

Grant10kOctober 15, 2005

Quote

1) Disable WPA altogether in favor of WEP, thereby leaving your network completely vulnerable.

WEP is not completely vulnerable, unsecured is completely vulnerable.
Some one would need to like...sit outside of your house scanning your network for a few days in order to crack your code. Just keep a look out for white cargo vans every couple days or so, then you'll be fine. I don't know much about your arch nemesis, but I doubt they will target your network when they can easily target any of the other 5 million unsecured networks within a 1 mile radius. If you have a problem with hackers hanging out on your front porch, just use MAC filtering.

StrellOctober 15, 2005

I'm currently researching WEP cracking and wireless security protocols (just wanted to say that since I hope it established some credability).

WEP is weak enough that it can be cracked easily, but there are a lot of different factors that have to be in place. First off, you need all the equipment to interoperate with each other. In short, this normally means that you have to be running a distro of Linux, use a crack program in there (Kismet is the most common), have compatible drivers, a wireless card running a specific chipset configuration, and possibly high-gain antennas to monitor possible signals. That doesn't take into account whether or not you are going to do this with 1 or 2 laptops, and also doesn't take into account some other things (such as distance from the access point, number of users, etc).

In order for someone to hack it quickly, they'd need to be next to it, there would have to be a user already connected that is transmitting large amounts of data, and you'd need to know specific information regarding the network (does it use MAC filtering, for example). Granted, Kismet can generally handle all of this by itself - it can get channels, user names, MAC addresses, cloaked SSIDs, etc.

So let's assume you have all of that in place.

You begin the attack, but you have to reach a certain number of IV ("Initialization vectors," which is a fancy way of saying a readable/sniffable packet of wireless information). For 64bit WEP it's roughly 100-200K, which will be roughly 160 megs of information. 128bit might require onwards of 1-2 million IVs. Getting those is going to take a while if you go through conventional means - i.e., you let your computer sniff the network and monitor traffic. I'd suspect you'd have to wait between 1-2 days before you could successfully decode the message.

Of course, this can be bypassed by getting "replay" programs that essentially bombard the AP will packets, which essentially causes IVs to be generated much more quickly, expediting the process. I found a movie of someone doing this, and they were able to capture the network within 10 minutes. Really interesting.

Anyway, the problem with all of this is that WEP is vulnerable, BUT this is offset by the fact that you really need to be an above-average computer user in order to understand and run all of the necessary software. I consdier myself pretty knowledgable about them, and even I know that right now, I couldn't explain this stuff to most people, it would be way over their heads.

The workaround to this? Get the Wifi adapter. Then you just bridge into the DS without compromising your WPA.

Still, it takes some time (at least 10 minutes, at the least), a bevy of equipment, and a lot of technical know-how in order to crack WEP.

You can always turn off your SSID broadcast, but Kismet can detect it nonetheless. Still, doing so will stop some people who are just searching around blindly. Turn off the beacons and my guess is that only the most technically saavy users will find your network then.

You can do MAC filtering, but that isn't very strong either. I personally know of a program I ran across that lets you dynamically change your MAC address through software, meaning that if a network used only that as its security, I could break through it in about 3 minutes, tops.

So recap:
1) WEP cracking is easy to do if you know how to do, have the equipment, are in range, and can interpret programs. But this is a huge hassle by itself.
2) Get the wifi adapter. I'm really hoping NIntendo will release it bundled with Mario Kart.
3) Use the highest WEP bit encryption if you can (128, 26 hexadecimal characters), turn off your SSID broadcast, and enable MAC filtering.

I don't know anything about WPA, I might research that tomorrow.

I think as technology progresses, people will naturally move towards higher protocols - WPA, for example, with LEAP authentications, etc - and leave WEP behind. And at that point, peopel can just use two APs - one running a 802.11b network for small access devices such as the DS, and higher ones running greater bandwidths and security protocols.

So I don't think of it as a problem. I'm getting the adapter purely to support Ninendo and send the message that they are doing the right thing. So I'll just bypass security issues and use it as opposed to another card or reconfiguring clients. That's not a totally acceptable answer, but it is the easier.

KDR_11kOctober 15, 2005

What is a "hexadecimal character"? There are hexadecimal digits and ASCII characters (and Unicode but I doubt you mean that).

RABicleOctober 15, 2005

Quote

Originally posted by: Strell
arsefuck of text
No one cares.

ssj4_androidOctober 16, 2005

Quote

Originally posted by: Grant10k
Quote

1) Disable WPA altogether in favor of WEP, thereby leaving your network completely vulnerable.

WEP is not completely vulnerable, unsecured is completely vulnerable.
Some one would need to like...sit outside of your house scanning your network for a few days in order to crack your code. Just keep a look out for white cargo vans every couple days or so, then you'll be fine. I don't know much about your arch nemesis, but I doubt they will target your network when they can easily target any of the other 5 million unsecured networks within a 1 mile radius. If you have a problem with hackers hanging out on your front porch, just use MAC filtering.


Few days? Make that a few minutes. (Ignore the april first date. This is legit, look at the Tom's Networking site.) There are step by step tutorials on how to crack WEP. MAC filtering is also a very weak form of protection, as someone can just clone your MAC address. WEP does make you a less appealing target though. Many people will probably just go to one of the numerous other connections that's not encrypted at all. Still, relying on that is not very secure at all.

PaleMike Gamin, Contributing EditorOctober 16, 2005

The point you are missing... There are two reasons someone would hack your wireless network...

1. They just want free internet.
2. They want to steal your personal information.

If they just want free internet, chances are they aren't gonna bother you much if it happens. Hell, if you are observant enough you woudl notice its happening and shut them out so they have to begin the process again. Also, if free internet is the case, assuming you live in any sort of populated area and are running WEP, chances are there is someone who isn't even securing their network. I live in a townhouse running WEP only, and my lappy can find 2 unsecured networks that I can connect to if I wanted.

The good thing about case 2 is you can know whether or not this is important. I mean... do you consistantly send private and vital information wirelessly? Think about someone actually getting on your network.. what can they find out? Man, they'd find out I'm a big PGC and Penny-Arcade fan... They'd also find out that I like to work on websites and games... Hmm... I guess what it comes down to is, do you have a reason to be this paranoid or do you just want to brag about how the 1337est of haxors coulnd't crack your mad security skillz? (I'm not talking to anyone specifically, just a general statment. I understand that I may not know how vital your network actually is.)

ArtimusOctober 16, 2005

Quote

Originally posted by: Pale
The point you are missing... There are two reasons someone would hack your wireless network...

1. They just want free internet.
2. They want to steal your personal information.

If they just want free internet, chances are they aren't gonna bother you much if it happens. Hell, if you are observant enough you woudl notice its happening and shut them out so they have to begin the process again. Also, if free internet is the case, assuming you live in any sort of populated area and are running WEP, chances are there is someone who isn't even securing their network. I live in a townhouse running WEP only, and my lappy can find 2 unsecured networks that I can connect to if I wanted.

The good thing about case 2 is you can know whether or not this is important. I mean... do you consistantly send private and vital information wirelessly? Think about someone actually getting on your network.. what can they find out? Man, they'd find out I'm a big PGC and Penny-Arcade fan... They'd also find out that I like to work on websites and games... Hmm... I guess what it comes down to is, do you have a reason to be this paranoid or do you just want to brag about how the 1337est of haxors coulnd't crack your mad security skillz? (I'm not talking to anyone specifically, just a general statment. I understand that I may not know how vital your network actually is.)


Probably worried about things like credit cards online and stuff. BUT...just buy the Nintendo key and have the best of both worlds!

31 FlavasOctober 16, 2005

Uhm... well unless your sending your CC# to a website over a non-secured HTTP link, you've got little to worry about, WEP or not. And I don't store my CC# anywhere on my PC (let alone, in plain text). Are we going to yip about key loggers now?

StrellOctober 17, 2005

Man, you try to write something informative for fellow forum members, and you get people who miss your point and ridicule the fact that you're trying to be helpful. The whole point was to educate and also show that the best solution is to get the adapter.

KDR: Maybe I shold have said alphanumeric, it just means 0-9, A-F. BTW you post on slashdot, aye? And there's a guy at another forum that I swear uses the same sig you have at /.

GG PGC forums, GG. Some of you need to grow the f*ck up.

ArtimusOctober 17, 2005

Quote

Originally posted by: Strell
Man, you try to write something informative for fellow forum members, and you get people who miss your point and ridicule the fact that you're trying to be helpful. The whole point was to educate and also show that the best solution is to get the adapter.

KDR: Maybe I shold have said alphanumeric, it just means 0-9, A-F. BTW you post on slashdot, aye? And there's a guy at another forum that I swear uses the same sig you have at /.

GG PGC forums, GG. Some of you need to grow the f*ck up.


Eh.

KDR_11kOctober 17, 2005

I think you meant hexadecimal digits, then. Even though systems with a base > 10 use letters those are still digits and numbers.

RennyOctober 17, 2005

'Article' link and subsequent discussion on BroadbandReports. Personally, I'll be setting up a seperate wireless network on the cheap, for just the DS. (I haven't yet found any info regarding the DS's TCP/IP abilities, but I suspect I'll need a dedicated AP.) I'm more concerned about the future: will the DS still only offer WEP in five years? WEP likely won't even be supported by then. The DS needs upgradeable security protocols or people will be relegated to using open hotspots.

ShyGuyOctober 17, 2005

well, thankfully the wireless software appears to be on the cartridge so, an update should be painless

PaLaDiNOctober 17, 2005

Except that we have no idea if the DS can implement WPA.

steveyOctober 17, 2005

"well, thankfully the wireless software appears to be on the cartridge so, an update should be painless"

WHAT were did you get that from? Has there be any word on voice chat yet?

31 FlavasOctober 17, 2005

Quote

Originally posted by: Rennywill the DS still only offer WEP in five years? WEP likely won't even be supported by then.
Oh come off it. The DS won't be around in 5 years... Heck, we'll probably have a DS SP (or whatever) this time next year.

Bottom line, you really should not be using wireless *AT ALL* if your computer or network has extreamly critical privacy needs. I doubt your home PC has anything that critical on it. Just use the Nintendo adapter if you've got something to hide.

ShyGuyOctober 17, 2005

Stevey, I haven't taken the time to find it yet, but if I recall correctly Craig from IGN was saying that it appeared to be cartridge based. (this is the problem with getting your nintendo news from too many sources, finding it after the fact)

If that's the case, couldn't updated software on a newer game provide WPA support? It was possible to flash the firmware of old wireless access points that supported WEP only, so I would think so.

RennyOctober 17, 2005

Quote

Originally posted by: 31 Flavas
Quote

Originally posted by: Rennywill the DS still only offer WEP in five years? WEP likely won't even be supported by then.


Oh come off it. The DS won't be around in 5 years... Heck, we'll probably have a DS SP (or whatever) this time next year.

Bottom line, you really should not be using wireless *AT ALL* if your computer or network has extreamly critical privacy needs. I doubt your home PC has anything that critical on it. Just use the Nintendo adapter if you've got something to hide.


The DS will be around in 5 years in some form. The appearance of a 'DS SP' wouldn't change any functionality that would obsolete the older version, meaning whatever networking paradigm they establish with this DS is the one we're stuck with. Any updates to the wireless abilities of the DS will be contained in the games themselves, so it is potentially possible to make important updates to the DS's networking without obsoleting older hardware. However it isn't clear whether that actually is possible or going to happen if it's possible.

As far as home network security, yes that's the most primitive action you can take, though still useful: disable file sharing over a wireless network. But allowing any unauthorized access to your network is a security risk, even with file/printer sharing disabled. The problem Nintendo is creating is most annoying for people with a single, well-secured network. They should be interested in making going online easy for these people too. Instead they're punishing people who practice good networking security. But so is the rest of the industry, it seems.

ArtimusOctober 17, 2005

Nintendo DS wi-fi in every McDonalds in the nation.

http://ds.ign.com/articles/659/659005p1.html

31 FlavasOctober 17, 2005

Quote

Originally posted by: Renny

The problem Nintendo is creating is most annoying for people with a single, well-secured network. They should be interested in making going online easy for these people too. Instead they're punishing people who practice good networking security. But so is the rest of the industry, it seems.
I agree that WPA should be far more adopted by now, but its not Nintendo's problem that it isn't. What i'm guess i'm trying to say is, at this point in time, practice good networking security where it's really necessary, but at home use what is flexible enough for all your devices. Like it or not we are still in a period where WPA support is spotty at best. In a home setting where wireless security is not so necessary, you're only hurting yourself if you won't use WEP.

Like you said, just make sure the PC's are locked up otherwise. I mean your Wireless signal is barely going to extend beyond the confines of your house and its not like you have anything to hide from the FBI, right? I doubt your home computer network has anything of value on it that would cause someone to crack your WEP and/or MAC filtering. If your home network really is important to keep secured, you're just going to have to bite the bullet and get a Buffalo adapter.

31 FlavasOctober 17, 2005

Quote

Originally posted by: Artimus
Nintendo DS wi-fi in every McDonalds in the nation.

http://ds.ign.com/articles/659/659005p1.html
Wow, that will cover just about everywhere. Now... how are they going to get that much equipment installed in every McDonalds? WiFi-wired McDonalds are pretty rare.

RennyOctober 17, 2005

Well I'm not laying the blame solely at the feet of Nintendo, but I would feel a lot better if they made the effort to accomodate 'early adopters' of wireless technology. And the conspiracist in me says that going with WEP not only absolves them of having to adopt a more demanding technology, but also encourages people to seek out 'Nintendo pimped' WiFi spots like those at McDonald's or to buy their own Nintendo-branded USB AP. And as I said I'm more concerned for the future. There will come a point where WEP is entirely unacceptable by even Joe Blow home networking standards. Will Nintendo update then?

On a more positive note, those with a Ralink RT2500-based card can use the SoftAP/driver "cwcpsoftAP.exe" provided by Cnet (hey, they're good for something afterall) to bridge their PC to an internet connection as an infrastructure access point, meaning the DS won't have to be in adhoc mode (which it likely doesn't support). I haven't had a chance to test it with a DS, obviously, but if it conforms to spec it ought to work.

UncleBobRichard Cook, Guest ContributorOctober 17, 2005

For those who haven't caught our whining on the DS board or didn't catch it in Artie's article he linked to, the Nintendo Wi-Fi USB Adapter is only going to be sold through Nintendo's online webstore. face-icon-small-sad.gif

31 FlavasOctober 17, 2005

Quote

Originally posted by: UncleBob
For those who haven't caught our whining on the DS board or didn't catch it in Artie's article he linked to, the Nintendo Wi-Fi USB Adapter is only going to be sold through Nintendo's online webstore. face-icon-small-sad.gif
why is that such a problem? DS works with existing Wi-Fi networks and Wi-Fi routers are a dime a dozen. You really should NOT need the adapter except in the rare case of a WPA network or a wifi network were you have to connect to it with special software on a PC.

UncleBobRichard Cook, Guest ContributorOctober 17, 2005

Or you're one of the many, many people who don't have a Wi-Fi router already and was really looking forward to Nintendo's Quick-and-Clean solution that they've been toting that was supposed to make going on-line "easy" and "for everyone"...

31 FlavasOctober 17, 2005

Quote

Originally posted by: UncleBob
Or you're one of the many, many people who don't have a Wi-Fi router already and was really looking forward to Nintendo's Quick-and-Clean solution that they've been toting that was supposed to make going on-line "easy" and "for everyone"...
So then just order it on-line and be done with it. You don't think they'll include a flyer in the Online DS game box advertising the adapter? (Not unlike how every Nintendo game includes a subscription card for Nintendo Power?)

PaLaDiNOctober 17, 2005

"Or you're one of the many, many people who don't have a Wi-Fi router already."

Fixed. Sorry, I'm getting sick of people here assuming everybody else cares about or follows what's said at Nintendo press conferences.

IceColdOctober 17, 2005

Quote

Originally posted by: PaLaDiN
"Or you're one of the many, many people who don't have a Wi-Fi router already."

Fixed. Sorry, I'm getting sick of people here assuming everybody else cares about or follows what's said at Nintendo press conferences.
Sorry Paladin, I think you quoted the wrong thing, or you forgot to change it or something, but that's the exact same quote; it wasn't fixed.

31 FlavasOctober 17, 2005

Quote

Originally posted by: IceCold

Sorry Paladin, I think you quoted the wrong thing, or you forgot to change it or something, but that's the exact same quote; it wasn't fixed.
Truncation is a vaild form of editing....

While I agree with the truncated statement. It's rediculusly easy to fix, as Wireless G 4 port routers are now as cheap as $20. Which makes me believe that the Nintendo/Buffalo wireless adapter will be in the same ballpark. $20 - $30.

ArtimusOctober 17, 2005

I need the USB dongle for the 8 months of the year I'm in school because I can't use my router on the school network. It's actually really useful because I'll just plug it into my USB drive and then I can play online when I wouldn't otherwise be able to!

NinGurl69 *hugglesOctober 17, 2005

Better get to the online store before other well-informed interwebbers do!

RennyOctober 17, 2005

Quote

Originally posted by: 31 Flavas
...In a home setting where wireless security is not so necessary, you're only hurting yourself if you won't use WEP.

Like you said, just make sure the PC's are locked up otherwise. I mean your Wireless signal is barely going to extend beyond the confines of your house and its not like you have anything to hide from the FBI, right? I doubt your home computer network has anything of value on it that would cause someone to crack your WEP and/or MAC filtering. If your home network really is important to keep secured, you're just going to have to bite the bullet and get a Buffalo adapter.


Might as well correct this. No, you're hurting yourself if you use WEP. It is not secure in any sense of the word. At best, it's a mild deterrent. Signal strength is not a form of security. Your signal will easily travel outside your home. Just hit up your preferred tech website to read about the ignorant home users versus "WiFi freeloaders" debacle. Whether I "have anything to hide from the FBI" is totally irrelevent. It's my network and my data. If I secure it that's because I don't want other people touching what isn't theirs. And yes, my computer does have things of value on it. Even though they aren't shared, they can still potentially be accessed if someone with the know-how gets on my network.

And I don't have to buy the Nintendo or Buffalo branded Buffalo adapters, but it would be a nice option if I knew where to get one. How about the Nintendo DS accessories section of my local games store?

IceColdOctober 17, 2005

Well yeah, but he just summed what Nintendo has been saying up in 2 or 3 sentences for those who didn't follow it. And most do care about this because Nintendo has been constantly saying that about the connection for a while now. If it really was that easy, people who didn't want to go through the hassle of a router would definitely care.

UncleBobRichard Cook, Guest ContributorOctober 18, 2005

Someone brought up a pretty good point eariler in this topic.

There are a number of college dorms that don't allow Wi-Fi networks. I'm sure the Nintendo DS USB adapter would probably be an okay alternative...

31 FlavasOctober 18, 2005

Quote

Originally posted by: Renny

Might as well correct this. No, you're hurting yourself if you use WEP. It is not secure in any sense of the word.
I'm not debating whether or not it is broken. It is totally broken, totally comprimised, I know. I wish it were not, but those are the facts. But its also a fact that most wireless devices DO NOT support WPA. So I can't use WPA unless I want to limit the usefulness of my wireless network. As I would assume would be the case for almost everyone else.

This wasn't clear in my post?

Quote

At best, it's a mild deterrent. Signal strength is not a form of security. Your signal will easily travel outside your home.
Unless you are using a signal booster, i doubt it will travel anywhere where someone can be covert. You'll notice if someone is camping out on your front or back porch. I only get 30-40% signal on the opposite sides of my house. If any of my neighbors recieve signal, it will be totally unreliable and useless to them. As well as to any vehicle parked on the street in front of my house.

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It's my network and my data. If I secure it that's because I don't want other people touching what isn't theirs. And yes, my computer does have things of value on it. Even though they aren't shared, they can still potentially be accessed if someone with the know-how gets on my network.
That's why I said you if YOU specifically need your network completely secure, whatever the reason, you'll just have to pony up the cash for a Nintendo/Buffalo adapter. If you value the security of your wireless network more then its usefulness, you have no choice but to exclude the many devices that only support WEP. And that is YOUR problem not Nintendo's.

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And I don't have to buy the Nintendo or Buffalo branded Buffalo adapters, but it would be a nice option if I knew where to get one. How about the Nintendo DS accessories section of my local games store?
How about you just RTFM for your game or look at the ad flyer that came with your Wi-Fi Connection game? If you know so much about WEP being broken, why don't you know how to order spare parts from Nintendo?

RennyOctober 18, 2005

I can convert my entire wireless network and all its clients to WPA, including the PSP, but not the DS. Despite the poor uptake of WPA, there are competing products that do and don't offer it, so I can choose those that suit my needs. That isn't the case with the DS as many people chose to buy the system on the merits of its games, the way it should be. About the closest competition is the PSP, which does offer WPA. How will that look to people educated in the security of WiFi? How will it look if the DS is still using only WEP in even a couple years?

No signal booster necessary. A directional antenna will improve the signal exponentially. Even a weak signal outside your property can be used. And how about apartments? If you've setup a wireless network in one, you know just how badly the signals overlap and how many of those networks are left open (probably the best defense for your network, someone else leaving theirs open :¬]).

What is my problem is also Nintendo's. If they really want to see 90% adoption of their online service, they need to provide for anyone who wants to use it. They've made an easy-to-use adapter (and hidden it on their website....), they're providing free WiFi access at hotspots that would otherwise charge, and the service itself is free. But they choose to leave the security-concious out in the cold.

As far as the idiocy of selling the adapter through the website, while it won't stop someone who is net-savvy (oh how that word makes me cringe) from purchasing it, it will stop anyone who simply doesn't know about it. Are they going to stick an ad between the safety pamphlet and the game manual? Put ads in stores?... where it can't be purchased. I hope that this really is just a 'trial' and that they'll soon put them in stores too.

31 FlavasOctober 18, 2005

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Originally posted by: Renny

I can convert my entire wireless network and all its clients to WPA, including the PSP, but not the DS. Despite the poor uptake of WPA, there are competing products that do and don't offer it, so I can choose those that suit my needs. That isn't the case with the DS as many people chose to buy the system on the merits of its games, the way it should be. About the closest competition is the PSP, which does offer WPA. How will that look to people educated in the security of WiFi? How will it look if the DS is still using only WEP in even a couple years?
... while we are on the subject... what WiFi internet games (not LAN only) does the PSP have? Busted broken ass Madden '06 and what else?

That aside, if your home wireless security is that critically important and the Nintendo adapter just doesn't cut it for you, then by all means, spend your money on a PSP. That's what you have to do if wireless security that is critically important for you. Honestly, though, at home, not everyone lives in an apartment right next to their archnemesis or next to a l33t h4x0r with intentions of pwning your computers. Chances are you're more likely to get pwnd by an Word macro, Active X exploit, or some other Windows vulnerabilty that Microsoft has not choosen to disclose yet.

Anyone that wants a Nintendo adapter can get one or figure it out. I'd be surpised if every Wi-Fi Connection game didn't include an ad for it along with Nintendo's spare parts 800# and website. If worse comes to worse, and they can't read, they can just ask an EB/GameStop employee for Nintendo's phone number.

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They've made an easy-to-use adapter (and hidden it on their website....), they're providing free WiFi access at hotspots that would otherwise charge, and the service itself is free. But they choose to leave the security-concious out in the cold.
You can please some of the people, all of the time. You can please all of the people, some of the time. But you cannot please all of the people, all of the time.

RennyOctober 18, 2005

They'll have to for 90% adoption, essentially every DS owner that has the slightest inclination to try it out. That's the very issue I'm addressing. I realize it's just hot air, but all the same they do seem to be acting aggressively about launching their online service. And simultaneously they're stumbling on classic Nintendo blunders before they've even started. "Anyone" is an outright lie. Selling it exclusively through their own website immediately limits sales of the device. This will hurt uptake of the online service as a result. The 'trial' better be real short.

And I didn't say PSP's online games were any good, but they are at least keeping their portable up-to-date. Sony are steadily improving it in terms of hardware. People will choose the PSP if its ease of use continues to increase over the DS. The DS is already considered inferior hardware, it won't help any to widen that gap.

ArtimusOctober 18, 2005

What is wrong with the USB thing? It allows you to keep security and everything.

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