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Messages - John Rairdin

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76
TalkBack / Miis Coming Soon to Social Media
« on: February 18, 2015, 07:45:21 AM »

Replace that poorly framed selfie with your mii!

http://www.nintendoworldreport.com/news/39658/miis-coming-soon-to-social-media

In a recent interview the Nikkei, Nintendo president Satoru Iwata revealed that Nintendo is currently in development of an app that will allow users to use their miis on social media.

The app would allow for miis to be used as profile pictures on various social media sites. According to Iwata, more details on the project are to be revealed around the release of the company's full-year results. This means we'll likely be hearing more about it in May.

In the past Nintendo has shied away from the mobile gaming market, feeling that many of Nintendo's key titles simply wouldn't work well on a touch screen only device. Nintendo's investors however have strongly urged Iwata to bring Nintendo into the mobile market. We'll just have to wait and see if this latest toe in the water is enough to satiate investors.


77
TalkBack / Re: Know Your Nintendo Developers: EAD Group 1
« on: February 09, 2015, 07:12:50 PM »
I like this segment, is this going to be a weekly thing with a new studio every Wednesday?


Sure is :)

78
TalkBack / Re: Know Your Nintendo Developers: EAD Group 1
« on: February 04, 2015, 05:49:29 PM »
Hey, I like Yoshi Story. I'd go so far as to say its my favorite of the Yoshi games.

79
TalkBack / Nintendo's Gamepads Episode 3
« on: December 06, 2014, 06:02:44 PM »

Lateral thinking of seasoned technology.

http://www.nintendoworldreport.com/video/39168/nintendos-gamepads-episode-3

In this episode John dives deeper into the work of Gunpei Yokoi. Witness the genesis of dual screen gaming and asymmetrical multiplayer. See how Nintendo took limitless complexity and made it sell to casual gamers.

Nintendo's Gamepads explores the history of Nintendo's controllers. From the Color TV-Games to the Wii U, Nintendo always does something unexpected.


80
TalkBack / Re: GBA Rewind: Super Mario Advance
« on: December 01, 2014, 04:01:07 PM »
Good video! Though it was painful watching Neal pick up the enemy on that vine, instead of just standing on it to pick up the coin. You were so close to the solution to your problem!

Shouldn't the "Subscribe" thing at the end be an actual button?


If only we had staff who's purpose was to maintain the YouTube channel ;)
Its fixed now, thanks reminding me.

81
TalkBack / Re: Captain Toad: Treasure Tracker Review
« on: December 01, 2014, 03:49:26 PM »
is it weird that I'm more excited about this than I was about Smash Bros?

82
TalkBack / Re: Majora's Mask Discussion: 3DS VS N64
« on: November 15, 2014, 08:40:06 PM »
I don't have Ocarina of Time 3D, but I thought they'd look more different than that


I think its safe to say this is the same engine as OoT 3D.

83
TalkBack / Rock Zombie Review
« on: November 11, 2014, 05:54:59 AM »

The other beat ‘em up starring scantily clad witches.

http://www.nintendoworldreport.com/review/38995/rock-zombie-review

Who would have thought that Nintendo’s Wii U would become a safe haven for games about sexy witches? Somehow it happened and we are left to deal with the consequences. Rock Zombie, developed by Quaternion Studio, draws heavy influence from late 80’s and early 90’s beat ‘em ups. Unfortunately it misses a few key points.

Rock Zombie follows an all female, heavy metal rock trio. During a concert they suddenly realize that their entire audience is comprised of zombies. Oh, also all three of them are witches. Does it factor into the story? No, but it makes the combat more interesting so just roll with it. After escaping the concert our heroines decide they need to get to the park because… well that’s not really clear. But what do you want? It’s a zombie beat ‘em up and there is plenty of that.

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Like the arcade games of yore, action takes place along a scrolling linear path. The player character is free to move up and down a short distance while progressing horizontally through the level. Combat is separated into three sets of moves: quick horizontal swipes with a guitar, slow vertical guitar swipes, and magic attacks. Vertical and horizontal swipes can be combined together in a few short combos for extra points. Magic attacks are extremely powerful and are charged up via the melee attacks, however magic recharges so quickly that you’ll find yourself wildly overpowered throughout most of the game. While not quite balanced, combat is still generally satisfying, albeit a little lonely.

One of the hallmarks of the arcade beat ‘em up genre is cooperative play. Each character had different stats and pairing them up made those games more interesting. Rock Zombie gives you three playable characters, each with their own strengths and weaknesses but it stops there. No multiplayer for you!

On top of that the game’s boss battles are extremely glitchy. At multiple points I found myself having to kill off my own character in order to get a boss to reset. One boss in particular would work himself into a spot where he could no longer attack me, nor could he be harmed in any way.

On the bright side the game looks and sounds reasonably nice. While not exactly photo real, it does look quite good for a budget title. The 3D environments are all varied and the world around you always feels interesting. This gives you a nice incentive to move forward. Similarly the sound and music are nothing to write home about but they serve their purpose. Watching blood spill out of zombies while hard rock music blares in your ears is certainly a guilty pleasure if nothing else.

All-in-all Rock Zombie has many of the trappings of a great game. The core mechanics work, and all of Rock Zombie’s failings are the sort of things that could be fixed in future updates. For now this may not be the arcade experience you’re looking for but with a little work, it could be a welcome addition to anyone’s Wii U home screen.


84
TalkBack / Re: Nintendo's Gamepads: Episode 2
« on: November 02, 2014, 05:13:36 PM »

Spoiler alert, the n64 controller sucks.
Compared to what? It was all we had.

Today everyone bases their controllers off a standard dual analogue design but back then there were no pre-defined design philosophies. Not sure if you grew up during that time but for me it never struck me as an odd controller when there was nothing to compare it to :)

85
TalkBack / Lone Survivor: Director's Cut Review
« on: November 01, 2014, 06:39:32 AM »

The Wii U’s latest survival horror title might be a little too complex for its own good.

http://www.nintendoworldreport.com/review/38891/lone-survivor-directors-cut-review

Horror games are often at their best when brought to life by independent developers. With no one to answer to, developers are free to try new and creative ways to make you pee yourself. These terrifying masterpieces aren't hard to find on PC but often lack the funding to reach consoles. I'm therefore delighted whenever I see one announced. Lone Survivor has sneaked its way into the eShop without much fanfare. Unfortunately, it's not quite the hidden gem one would hope for.

You're dropped into the role of a man who has managed to survive an outbreak of some sort. He's held up in an apartment whose owners have long since vacated. Zombie-like creatures roam the halls of the apartment building, but they are not the strangest things you will see. As you explore, you’ll begin to notice that the state of the apartment building is not static. Rooms may seem pristine one day and ruined the next. The world around you is in flux, and it’s up to you to figure out what's going on.

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While Lone Survivor presents you with an engaging story, it is often halted by zealous and overly complex mechanics. For example, in order to save the game, your character has to go to sleep in his bed. In addition, your character will also grow tired the longer he's out exploring. That would be fine, but your character also needs to eat. He won't go to sleep and therefore won't recover stamina and save the game unless he's full. The real problem, however, is that eating is hard.

Say you find some pickles. Rather than allowing you to simply eat them, the game requires first opening the package, but not with your hand, of course. First, you have to go find a can opener. This is the apocalypse; he should just smash open the pickle container! You don't need to maintain proper kitchen etiquette! Pickles are actually relatively easy, though. Some items must be opened (with the correct kitchen gadget) and then also cooked in a skillet (no, that sauce pan won’t do). I just want to save my game! In addition, the whole time you're trying to prepare an elegant feast, your character will be popping up messages on the screen for you to click through. These messages detail such useful information as "I'm hungry" and "I'm tired." Gee, thanks.

If you manage to not die of sleep deprivation caused by a lack of pickles, then you can continue to explore the game world, where you will encounter monsters who attack you the moment they see you. While you will eventually obtain a weapon, the best way to deal with the monsters is stealth. Presenting you with dilemmas about whether to sneak past or shoot your way through is something this game does quite well. It’s such moments, when you're fretting over how much ammo you have left, that you remember why the survival-horror genre works so well.

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The pixel art in the game is quite impressive, and Lone Survivor manages to squeeze a nice amount of detail out of its sprites. Unfortunately, the art style just isn't scary. The monsters' big cartoonish heads and predictable animations mean that their presence is never cause for any real panic. Keep in mind, this review is coming from a survival horror lightweight, playing in the dark, with headphones. To be clear, the artwork isn't bad by any means. The art style just isn't conducive to scares, even though this is a very good looking game. Light and shadow are handled very well, and the occasional overlay effects really create some interesting visuals.

Lone Survivor encourages you to play with headphones, and the GamePad's headphone jack works even if the game is being played on the TV (something developers regularly forget). Unfortunately, the soundscape is very sparse. It's far too easy to know what every sound is, and therefore be ready for every monster along your path. A good horror soundtrack should have sounds that leave you wondering if there was something behind you a moment ago. Once again, as with the visuals, the game's sound is good but needs more.

Lone Survivor feels like a very strong first draft of a game. The story is great. Unfortunately, the game does nothing to help you experience that story. On the contrary, it seems intent on keeping you from experiencing it whenever possible. Sometimes a game doesn't need a lot of complex mechanics. Sometimes a game can just tell a story, be an experience. Lone Survivor gets bogged down trying to add complexity where none is necessary, and it greatly detracts from the experience of playing the game. The story becomes a sub-point to the gameplay, rather than standing on its own.


86
TalkBack / Nintendo's Gamepads: Episode 2
« on: October 29, 2014, 02:32:02 PM »

Get back in the Learning Mobile!

http://www.nintendoworldreport.com/video/38870/nintendos-gamepads-episode-2

If you missed the first episode you can check it out here

In episode 2 of Nintendo's Gamepads we meet an inventor name Gunpei Yokoi. Yokoi invented what might very well be the most important thing in the history of controllers, the D-Pad. As Nintendo moved from the third generation with the NES through to the fourth and fifth generations they'd have to get creative with their controllers.

Learn all about the design philosophies behind the NES, SNES, and N64 controllers in this video!


87
TalkBack / Six Ways to Get Alpha Sapphire/Omega Ruby Demo
« on: October 21, 2014, 05:12:00 AM »

Putting it on the eShop is just too easy.

http://www.nintendoworldreport.com/news/38788/six-ways-to-get-alpha-sapphireomega-ruby-demo

Apparently Nintendo really enjoyed the early demos they gave away for Smash Bros. 3DS, because they're doing it all over again. To build hype for the upcoming release of Pokémon Alpha Sapphire and Omega Ruby, Nintendo is distributing a free, though somewhat hard to get, early demo. Unlike the Smash Bros. demo, Nintendo is offering six different ways to acquire the new Pokémon demo.

1. Go see a movie. Nintendo will be giving out codes at select cinema locations from November 7th to November 13th. (The list hasn't been announced as of this time.)

2. Retailers will be given codes to distribute as prizes for giveaways throughout the holiday season.

3. When you buy Pokémon Art Academy from Nintendo eShop on your Nintendo 3DS or 2DS system, a code will be included with purchase.

4. Don't want Art Academy? No problem, codes will also come with two Pokémon games coming to the Virtual Console. Pokémon Puzzle Challenge and Pokémon Trading Card Game will each come with a code.

5. If you're lucky, Nintendo might just send you a code. During the week of October 31st, Nintendo will email out codes to a select group of Nintendo Network IDs who have opted to receive promotional emails from Nintendo.

6. Finally, codes will be distributed throughout the holiday mall tour at sixteen different locations. The tour runs from November 24th to December 21st. Nintendo says they will be announcing specific tour locations shortly.


88
Podcast Discussion / Re: Episode 402: Witch Time Zones
« on: October 20, 2014, 11:28:26 PM »
I've reached the point in my writing career in which James Jones makes fun of my videos on now playing. I feel strangely accomplished...

89
TalkBack / 3DS Can Now Download From Home Menu Without Sleep Mode
« on: October 16, 2014, 08:58:50 PM »

Here's how to download eShop games from the home menu without putting your 3DS to sleep.

http://www.nintendoworldreport.com/news/38766/3ds-can-now-download-from-home-menu-without-sleep-mode

Tucked away in the version 9.0.0-20 update for the 3DS is a useful little trick that will enable players to download eShop games from the home menu without putting the 3DS to sleep.

Previously after selecting download later in the eShop, an ghosted icon would appear in the home menu and the download would begin once the 3DS was closed. Now, by double clicking the ghosted icon you can manually begin the download without having to relaunch the eShop.


90
TalkBack / New 3DS LL Greatly Outsells New 3DS in Japan
« on: October 16, 2014, 08:57:06 PM »

Looks like face plates don't beat screen size.

http://www.nintendoworldreport.com/news/38767/new-3ds-ll-greatly-outsells-new-3ds-in-japan

Thanks to sales figures published by Famitsu, we can now see that the vast majority of Japanese gamers have picked screen size over face plates.

Over the course of the systems launch weekend, the standard sized New 3DS sold 61,151 units while the larger New 3DS LL managed to sell a whopping 172,332 units. That's nearly three times the sales of the standard New 3DS.

When Nintendo announced the New 3DS and New 3DS LL, it was revealed that only the New 3DS would feature interchangeable face plates. The New 3DS also features a redesigned form factor (similar to the original 3DS XL) and a larger screen than the original 3DS.  These things combined made many assume that the New 3DS would outsell its larger counterpart. It would seem however that in this case, it really is the size that matters.


91
TalkBack / Re: Nintendo's Gamepads: Episode 1
« on: October 16, 2014, 03:51:54 PM »
Thanks! I'm glad you liked it. And I'll certainly look in close captions, thanks for pointing it out :)

92
TalkBack / Nintendo's Gamepads: Episode 1
« on: October 14, 2014, 07:50:17 PM »

In this new series, John takes a look at the incredibly varied history of Nintendo's controllers.

http://www.nintendoworldreport.com/video/38743/nintendos-gamepads-episode-1

We've all heard it. "Why doesn't Nintendo go back to making regular systems?" People look at the Wii and the Wii U and wonder what happened to the Nintendo they grew up with. But what if I told you Nintendo had always been that way?

In the first episode of Nintendo's Gamepads we look at some of Nintendo's earliest controllers, but perhaps not the ones you're thinking of.


93
TalkBack / Who is Mario
« on: October 14, 2014, 03:12:17 PM »

John's first video for NWRTV explores the psychology behind Nintendo's most famous character.

http://www.nintendoworldreport.com/video/38714/who-is-mario

Have you ever wondered why Mario appeals to people all around the world? In this video we explore who Mario is as a character and how players perceive him.

After you watch the video don't forget to subscribe to http://youtube.com/NinWRTV.


94
Nintendo Gaming / Re: Screw it, I'm making a Devil's Third Topic
« on: October 11, 2014, 08:37:02 PM »
Even if this game didn't wind up being that good, I'll still respect it for trying something new. They seem to be going out of their way to rethink the conventions of shooters and bet'em ups and you have to respect them for that. Really no wonder that Nintendo would swoop in and pick up a game like this, its right up their ally.

95
TalkBack / Re: Nintendo World Report TV Coming to Your YouTube
« on: October 10, 2014, 03:37:40 PM »
There's this video of Curtis singing, that oughta help ;)


http://youtu.be/HjDSvY1SVQQ

96
TalkBack / Nintendo World Report is Hiring!
« on: September 07, 2020, 08:34:16 AM »

Want to review video games? Maybe do some editing? Inquire within!

http://www.nintendoworldreport.com/jobs

We're looking for a few good men or women to join the staff of Nintendo World Report. We're currently looking for the positions below. Let us know if you're interested, and if you have any questions, e-mail nwrjobs@nintendoworldreport.com



Freelance Reviewer

Do you own a Nintendo Switch and have a desire to play all sorts of games, be it big-name Nintendo ones or indie titles? Does the idea of playing games on a deadline so you can tell the world your thoughts about them in written or video form intrigue you? Well, if so, then maybe you're fit for joining us here at Nintendo World Report as a Freelance Reviewer.

Here's what you need:

  • Great writing skills and the ability to learn from edits: We'll work with you, but all we ask is that you have a baseline quality, try your best, and learn.
  • Ability to hit deadlines and communicate with editors: When you get a game to review, there will be a deadline that we expect you to meet. Of course, things happen. That's okay sometimes. Just talk to your editor.
  • A Nintendo Switch: It will be hard to review Switch games without one!

Here's some nice-to-haves:

  • Audio recording and/or podcasting experience: We do a lot of stuff in the world of podcasts, video, and streaming. If you come aboard, we'd love for you to join that fun aurally.
  • Video capture capability: Some games are gonna need a video review. If you can capture footage, that gives you more opportunities.
  • Video editing capability: Furthermore, some of those games might need someone to edit a video review. If you can do that (or at least want to learn how to do that), awesome!

To wrap it all up, location really doesn't matter, especially now. The only regional requirement is the ability to write in English. If you're from North America, Europe, Australia, Japan, or basically anywhere else, that's fine. The Switch makes it easy to make regional accounts anyway.

Working at Nintendo World Report doesn't come without perks. While we're a volunteer site, we do offer access to the gaming industry, chances to attend events such as E3 and PAX, and review copies of games. We have been around since 1999, and members of our staff have gone on to work at Nintendo, THQ, LucasArts, Game Informer, G4, IGN, and more. Also, members of our staff have been published at IGN, Electronic Gaming Monthly, 1UP, GamePro, and many more.

If you're interested, submit a paragraph or two about yourself, a link to any blogs or past work you'd like to show us, and a review written in the NWR style (see below) to nwrjobs@nintendoworldreport. Depending on experience, a video interview may be required.




Associate Editor

Have you ever thought to yourself while playing a video game or sitting around online, "Ya know, it'd be cool to write about video games. That'd be rad, right?" Good news, friend: you can! We're looking for an Associate Editor to join the team and help with our news, review, and feature coverage.

Here's what you need:

  • Great writing skills and the ability to learn from edits: We'll work with you, but all we ask is that you have a baseline quality, try your best, and learn.
  • Ability to hit deadlines and communicate with editors: When you get a game to review, there will be a deadline that we expect you to meet. Of course, things happen. That's okay sometimes. Just talk to your editor.
  • Creative follow-through: This may or may not be a term invented right now, but if you have an idea for like, a cool way to approach a review or a fun feature or a neat video idea, follow through on it. We have a big team with experience willing to help you.

Here's some nice-to-haves:

  • Audio recording and/or podcasting experience: We do a lot of stuff in the world of podcasts, video, and streaming. If you come aboard, we'd love for you to join that fun aurally.
  • Video capture capability: Some games are gonna need a video review. If you can capture footage, that gives you more opportunities.
  • Video editing capability: Furthermore, some of those games might need someone to edit a video review. If you can do that (or at least want to learn how to do that), awesome!
  • A Nintendo Switch: It will be hard to review Switch games without one!

To wrap it all up, location really doesn't matter, especially now. The only regional requirement is the ability to write in English. If you're from North America, Europe, Australia, Japan, or basically anywhere else, that's fine. The Switch makes it easy to make regional accounts anyway.

Working at Nintendo World Report doesn't come without perks. While we're a volunteer site, we do offer access to the gaming industry, chances to attend events such as E3 and PAX, and review copies of games. We have been around since 1999, and members of our staff have gone on to work at Nintendo, THQ, LucasArts, Game Informer, G4, IGN, and more. Also, members of our staff have been published at IGN, Electronic Gaming Monthly, 1UP, GamePro, and many more.

If you're interested, submit a paragraph or two about yourself, a link to any blogs or past work you'd like to show us, and a short feature about the history of a video game you like written in the NWR style (see below) to nwrjobs@nintendoworldreport. Depending on experience, a video interview may be required.


NWR style is loosely defined for the purposes of these applications. What we do ask is that you follow the format presented on our site. News stories should include a headline, an abstract, sources (with links), and body text. Previews should contain only factual information and informed speculation. Reviews require a score following the guidelines here, and pros and cons.


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