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Run the Developer 1: Shin'en Multimedia

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Mr. Bungle:

--- Quote from: Adrock on May 04, 2021, 08:26:05 PM ---I’ll see if I can track down Iridion II.

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According to pricecharting.com the loose copies have gone from $10 to $30 in the past 6 years. Is that happening with most GBA games?



--- Quote from: NWR_insanolord on February 21, 2012, 06:50:10 PM ---As someone who just got around to starting Nano Assult the other day because of my Lindemann-esque 3DS backlog, I'll say that any future entry in the series should support the Circle Pad Pro.

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I found this old post from Insanolord when searching the forums. A full sequel was never released but Nano Assault Ex did end up supporting the circle pad pro.


--- Quote from: Discord.RSS on May 05, 2021, 09:18:15 AM ---Never realized they came from a licensed games background either, good on them for escaping that cycle and striking out with multiple franchises of their own.

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Here is the full list of licensed games:

* Maya the Bee: The Great Adventure (GBA, 2002)
* Maya the Bee: Sweet Gold (GBA, 2005)
* Miss Spider's Sunny Patch Friends (DS, 2006)
* Garfield's Nightmare (DS, 2007)
* Pet Alien: An Intergalactic Puzzlepalooza (DS, 2007)
* Strawberry Shortcake: The Four Seasons Cake (DS, 2007)
and a link to the full list of Shin'en games that I meant to put in the initial post.


--- Quote from: Discord.RSS on May 05, 2021, 09:18:15 AM ---I've been meaning to look into the differences between NEO and RMX, to see if it's worth grabbing such a fairly iterative sequel.

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I imagine one difference would be that it is much easier to find random matches for online play in RMX. If there are a bunch of new tracks or new modes let me know because I would double dip for that.


--- Quote from: Discord.RSS on May 05, 2021, 09:18:15 AM ---Nanostray: The first Shin'en game I played, since it went for dirt cheap at the time. It's a competent vertical shooter, with some touch screen shenanigans to activate special lasers. Not an enduring classic, and it's a lot harder than Nano Assault, but it's all right.

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I lumped Nanostray in with Nano Assault since they were both shooters and had the Nano prefix. It doesn't sound like they are the same series.  ???



--- Quote from: BeautifulShy on May 05, 2021, 11:56:07 PM ---I want to pick up Fast Racing Neo for the Switch. Probably digital version. I love futuristic racers.

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Strangely enough Neo did get a retail disc in Europe and Australia that included all the DLC. It was part of the eShop selects line. North America did get the Steamworld Collection though.

I also found it interesting that Shin'en started self-publishing as soon as the digital storefronts appeared on Nintendo systems. Prior to that they were published by some company like Majesco. This might have allowed them to steer away from licensed games as well.

Adrock:

--- Quote from: Mr. Bungle on May 06, 2021, 01:58:55 PM ---According to pricecharting.com the loose copies have gone from $10 to $30 in the past 6 years. Is that happening with most GBA games?
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Common games like Mario Kart: Super Circuit can be found for ~$15 and free shipping. Sellers will still try to inflate the value. Just have to be patient.

Rarer games like Pokémon Emerald, for example, will cost you one kidney, 13 months of hard labor, your house, and first born child. If you do not have children, you must steal one in order to complete the transaction. May seem steep, but do you want to catch Rayquaza before facing the Elite Four or not?

Discord.RSS:

--- Quote from: Mr. Bungle on May 06, 2021, 01:58:55 PM ---I lumped Nanostray in with Nano Assault since they were both shooters and had the Nano prefix. It doesn't sound like they are the same series.  ???
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I think it's fair to lump them together, but they are quite different in terms of gameplay, and even setting. The core idea (there's a nano-virus, we hate it) is a constant presence throughout the NanoStray and Nano Assault games.

NanoStray is set in space, you travel to I believe the center of a solar system, stopping by planets to blast enemies. I feel like the setting was very mechanical: space ships, robots, machines, steel & concrete buildings. The gameplay is vertically scrolling, similar to Xevious, Raiden, Star Soldier and such. Levels auto-scroll, end in bosses, movement and aiming are paired, and there's an emphasis on score multipliers and such. Frankly, it's hard to see what the enemies have to do with a virus, since they might as well be aliens.

Nano Assault executes better on the nano-virus presence imo, by changing the setting to individual cells. Enemies are now mostly biological, looking like microbes, tardigrades, viruses, coral/anemone derivatives. Rather than a space setting they're trying to suggest you're in a bloodstream.
In terms of gameplay this hews a lot closer to Robotron, Assault Android Cactus, or Geometry Wars. You control the pace, move in all directions, shoot separately from movement and have free aim. Unlike most twin-stick shooters, the environments are 3D, rather than flat terrains at an isometric angle. You can move along all sides of the cells, reminiscent of the tiny planetoids in Mario Galaxy.

I'd see them as an iteration on a premise, just different branches of arcade shooters. I believe the 3DS game, Nano Assault EX, also incorporates rail shooter stages in the vein of Space Harrier, Starfox, and Panzer Dragoon. Kinda odd no version of Nano Assault is on Switch yet, wonder if they'll make that happen.

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