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Parenthood, Kids, & Gaming

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Stratos:
So been meaning to post a thread like this for a while since I am a father now. Would love to heal other's thoughts and experiences with gaming once you became a parent.

How has it changed your play style and game preferences?

When did you introduce (or plan to introduce) gaming to your kids?

What games and systems do you recommend for various age groups?

Best family games?

I had always hoped to do a chronological introduction to game systems from NES and every year or so introduce another in their release order like some have talked about doing. But if I also plan to keep up with modern systems I know that could muddy the waters on this sort of introduction method. Also eventually they will have friends that play modern games so how long could I even maintain this restriction? I'd have to make it a faster pace than I originally planned.

What's everyone else's experiences with raising kids and games?

MKBungle:
Disclaimer: I am not a parent, however I have friends and family that have little ones so I have a little experience trying to get them into gaming.


--- Quote from: Stratos on August 12, 2021, 06:47:45 PM ---When did you introduce (or plan to introduce) gaming to your kids?
What games and systems do you recommend for various age groups?
Best family games?

--- End quote ---

I have had the most luck with Mario Maker. Young kids (as young as five) are able to have quite a bit of fun using it as a sandbox to make levels. You can also make really easy levels that don't require running or even jumping. I think I have a few uploaded online that are like this. I bought the wedge 2DS for at least four kids and it is a really good fit for young people. I think they would still need to be about 4 years old, but those things are really solid and don't break easily. They were about $70 but I don't know if you can still get them anymore so I guess you would get a switch lite with a tough case now  ???. Any younger and you probably just want to use tablets with touch controls as the sticks/d-pads will be to difficulty to control.

Khushrenada:

--- Quote from: Stratos on August 12, 2021, 06:47:45 PM ---I had always hoped to do a chronological introduction to game systems from NES and every year or so introduce another in their release order like some have talked about doing. But if I also plan to keep up with modern systems I know that could muddy the waters on this sort of introduction method. Also eventually they will have friends that play modern games so how long could I even maintain this restriction? I'd have to make it a faster pace than I originally planned.

--- End quote ---

I guess you are just going to have to do your own home schooling on the subject with gaming as homework. Video Games 101 - Arcade Classics. Video Games 102 - Early Home Systems Atari and Intellevision. Video Games 103 - Nintendo Enters The Market 1985 - 1990. Video Games 104 - The Nintendo / Sega Console Wars 1990-1995. Video Games 105 - Sony Enters the Market 1995 - 2000.

Hmmmm. Now I'm thinking we should just start our own college for Video Games. Mop it Up can handle the N64 courses. Steefosaurus can tackle Wii U. I'll take GameCube (Cha-ching!). Don't worry, Stratos. Your kids will get the gaming education you crave once we get this organized!

Stratos:
Just as long as tuition isn't requiring me to get a second mortgage!

Order.RSS:

--- Quote from: Stratos on August 12, 2021, 06:47:45 PM ---I had always hoped to do a chronological introduction to game systems from NES and every year or so introduce another in their release order like some have talked about doing. But if I also plan to keep up with modern systems I know that could muddy the waters on this sort of introduction method. Also eventually they will have friends that play modern games so how long could I even maintain this restriction? I'd have to make it a faster pace than I originally planned.
--- End quote ---

A recent RFN episode (#732) kinda covers this idea. I do kinda like it in theory, but also sort of wonder about the rationale. I think it's easy to convince ourselves these games are more easily/immediately understood due to their simple nature... But conveniently forget how a lot of them are pretty difficult/demanding.

I guess it's easier if you start them off on a NES/SNES Classic before all their classmates are talking Roblox/MineCraft/Fortnite etc., since they won't have as much of a frame of reference for what games do/should look like.
Is the purpose to run them through a condensed version of technological increases/leaps and slowly increase the complexity? It makes sense, but maybe that's easy to say when we've experienced it ourselves. With the wide variety of games out there, I think children nowadays are just more accepting of vast differences in graphics and complexity than we were, demanding everything be 3D during the N64/PS1 era.

Boring answer but I guess I'd just try to gauge their interest in the hobby a few times, maybe present a few different options, and see what they gravitate towards? And if they don't enjoy older stuff, I guess we just kinda need to accept that. Maybe try again when they're teens ("this is what we played back in the day").

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